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Old 09-30-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Downtown LA
1,192 posts, read 1,229,650 times
Reputation: 848

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
At least the ones in LA are kitschy in a fun way.

The Chicago equivalent is called a "four-plus-one" because most have four floors plus the first level, which is for parking. They're all really drab and hideous. You're most likely to see them in Edgewater Beach, parts of Lakeview, and throughout the Northwest Side.
Trust me, we have way too much of that four-plus-one stuff too. Koreatown is full of it.
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Old 09-30-2015, 01:25 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,140 posts, read 5,960,298 times
Reputation: 8691
When it comes to Art Deco there is little to rival the Bronx, which despite its tawdry reputation is home to hundreds of drop-dead gorgeous Art Deco structures. See here:

https://www.google.com/search?q=art+...IVSx8eCh2PagpK

And of course, one of the crown jewels of the Manhattan skyline is the Art Deco Chrysler building

https://www.google.com/search?q=chry...0JhQhx#imgrc=_

With Art Deco, it's hard to beat the Apple
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Old 09-30-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,048,640 times
Reputation: 2581
Washington, D.C.

Greek Revival
Georgian
Roman Revival
Egyptian Revival
Brutalist
Post Modern
Modern
Neo-Classical
Federalist
Beaux-Arts
Queen Anne
Richardsonian Romanesque
Châteauseque
Victorian
Second French Empire
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Downtown LA
1,192 posts, read 1,229,650 times
Reputation: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
Washington, D.C.

Greek Revival
Georgian
Roman Revival
Egyptian Revival
Brutalist
Post Modern
Modern
Neo-Classical
Federalist
Beaux-Arts
Queen Anne
Richardsonian Romanesque
Châteauseque
Victorian
Second French Empire
I think OP was asking for which cities best represent each architectural styles, not for a list of all the styles you can find in each city.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,945 posts, read 3,605,390 times
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Seattle's architectural history through the years:

In Seattle's oldest neighborhood, Pioneer Square has Renaissance Revival architecture. Downtown Seattle outside of Pioneer Square is much more eclectic and hosts a wide variety of styles, from gorgeously detailed Beaux-Arts structures featuring architectural terracotta detailing to Postmodern structures. Most of the newer skyscrapers being modern/postmodern structures, with a couple Brutalist structures.

As for the residential parts of Seattle, here is a good breakdown:

1890s: Queen Anne – Victorian
1900s: Seattle Box – Four Square
1910s: Craftsman Bungalow – Arts and Crafts
1920s: Dutch Colonial
1930s: Tudor
1940s: Cape Cod
1950s: Mid-Century
1960s: Stark 60s Modern
1970s: Split-Entry
1980s: NW Contemporary – Minimalist (basically large boxes covered in wooden paneling)
1990s: Post Modernism (the suburban nightmare; luckily there are very few of these in Seattle proper)
2000 and beyond: Traditional Revivals and Modern Hybrids, including Townhomes built upon a shared driveway.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,647 posts, read 7,082,546 times
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Although some Floridians and maybe even Texans may disagree, the birthplace of and city that best represents Spanish Colonial Revival architecture would be San Diego.

https://www.google.com/search?q=San+...=1422&bih=1242
(to not copyright infringe and I'm too lazy busy right now to collate and post some photos of my own)

The style really came to the forefront because of the 1915 San Diego Panama Exposition where it was especially represented in Balboa Park and it spread forward across the country from other designers and individuals wishing to produce or own a building evoking such a romantic heritage after that.

From the Baroque Churrigueresque ornamental architecture of the buildings along Plaza de Panama in the Park to the strong, simple forms of Santa Fe Depot downtown, to modernist cubist forms of local architect Irving Gill. This architectural style is found everywhere in the city from its most monumental buildings to fancy and lowly retail centers, apartment buildings, cottage courts, mansions and modest bungalows (including my own 1928 casita) you can't really escape it here. And that's not a bad thing, it is one of my favorite architectural styles.
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Old 09-30-2015, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,048,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictDirt View Post
I think OP was asking for which cities best represent each architectural styles, not for a list of all the styles you can find in each city.
Oh okay, missed the memo on that one.

Well in that case, for DC I'd say:

Federalist
Greek Revival
Roman Revival
Second French Empire
Brutalist
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Old 09-30-2015, 03:29 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,419,152 times
Reputation: 8775
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
Although some Floridians and maybe even Texans may disagree, the birthplace of and city that best represents Spanish Colonial Revival architecture would be San Diego.

https://www.google.com/search?q=San+...=1422&bih=1242
(to not copyright infringe and I'm too lazy busy right now to collate and post some photos of my own)

The style really came to the forefront because of the 1915 San Diego Panama Exposition where it was especially represented in Balboa Park and it spread forward across the country from other designers and individuals wishing to produce or own a building evoking such a romantic heritage after that.

From the Baroque Churrigueresque ornamental architecture of the buildings along Plaza de Panama in the Park to the strong, simple forms of Santa Fe Depot downtown, to modernist cubist forms of local architect Irving Gill. This architectural style is found everywhere in the city from its most monumental buildings to fancy and lowly retail centers, apartment buildings, cottage courts, mansions and modest bungalows (including my own 1928 casita) you can't really escape it here. And that's not a bad thing, it is one of my favorite architectural styles.
I agree, I love SD's Spanish Colonial Architecture. For smaller cities Santa Barbara is also tops imo.
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Old 09-30-2015, 03:39 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 3,905,948 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
At least these LA dingbats are kitschy in a fun way.

The Chicago equivalent of cheap, mid-century, multi-family housing is called a "four-plus-one" because most have four floors plus the first level, which is for parking. They're all really drab and hideous. You're most likely to see them in Rodgers Park, Albany Park, Edgewater Beach, parts of Lakeview, and throughout the Northwest Side.











Every big city has these.
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Old 09-30-2015, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
1,899 posts, read 1,519,213 times
Reputation: 1567
Phoenix has a lot of Mid century modern and post modern buildings.
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