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Old 01-06-2016, 08:33 AM
 
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New England has always been my favorite region, and after living here for two years, I appreciate it more than ever. Having just visited my sixth and final New England state of the past 12 months, I've been thinking about the geographic split within even this very compact region. I really do think New England has, to a significant extent, a consistent feel and a consistent culture. But the north-south division is nonetheless something you can feel, with references to "Southern New England" common below the northern border of Massachusetts and a general acknowledgement of a different atmosphere once you cross it.

Which do you prefer? Southern New England (Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts) or Northern New England (Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine)? Personally, I can't make up my mind. Each area has its own considerable assets. No criteria here -- judge on what you value as a visitor. I'm thinking more about these areas as places to visit than as places to live, as people who want to move to Northern Maine are going to have very different priorities than people who relocate to the Boston suburbs.

Southern New England has:
  • Boston and environs
  • Cape Cod
  • Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard and Block Island
  • Cape Ann
  • Salem's history, charm and New Age scene
  • The Berkshires
  • The Pioneer Valley
  • Newport's nautical heritage and historic architecture
  • Rhode Island beaches
  • Narragansett Bay
  • Providence's arts, architecture, food and history
  • Sailing (I'll give this to SNE even though you can do it up north, too)
  • Long Island Sound
  • Mystic Seaport and the adjacent village
  • Greater Hartford
  • New Haven's professors and pizza
  • Fairfield County's mega-affluent suburban towns

But Northern New England counters with:
  • The Maine Coast
  • Portland's Old Port and its killer food-and-drink scene
  • Maine's islands
  • Acadia National Park
  • Lobster (so associated with Maine that you have to put it here, even though SNE has it, too)
  • Francophone culture on the Canadian border
  • Portsmouth and the New Hampshire Seacoast
  • Lake Winnipesaukee
  • The White Mountains
  • The Green Mountains
  • Ski resorts
  • Ski towns
  • Lake Champlain
  • Burlington's counterculture
  • Brattleboro's arts in the foothills
  • Maple syrup
  • Vermont's dairy industry, including Ben & Jerry's and Cabot

Last edited by boulevardofdef; 01-06-2016 at 08:44 AM..
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Old 01-06-2016, 09:38 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
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If I moved back to New England, I'd probably prefer to live somewhere like Burlington, VT or Portland, Maine. As much as I love places like the Cape, Salem, and RI beaches, it's a bit too crowded and congested in Southern NE to my liking for me to want to be around it full time. Even Southern NH feels that way at times. Burlington and Portland are pretty removed from the rat race. I always liked Burlington's setting on the lake, nice sunsets over the Adirondacks, and a vibrant downtown with Montreal being right up the road.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 01-06-2016 at 09:52 PM..
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Old 01-07-2016, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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My Active Duty career had me stationed near New London Ct many times, starting in the mid-70's and a few years of the 80's and the 90's, until I retired in '01. No matter how far away a transfer took me, a few years later I kept getting sent back again. Ct, RI and Long Island are all okay.

But after I retired we went to Maine. We settled in a region that you would likely call Northern Maine, though technically we are in the Southern half of Maine [30 miles North of Bangor]. It is a lot different from the rest of New England. We like these differences.
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Old 01-07-2016, 07:54 PM
 
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I think I prefer northern New England, especially Portland Maine. I grew up in NC and Maine definitely reminds me more of carrboro/chapel hill/Asheville in NC.

That said, I live in providence ane am a big fan of the city and its location near Boston, Newport and NYC. If I was settled down, I might be inclined to move to Portland and Burlington instead of living in southern New England.
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Old 01-07-2016, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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Southern New England is good for the urban inclined.

Northern New England is good for the rural inclined.

I'd love to own a house in Boston and a summer house somewhere way up in New Hampshire or Vermont. Too bad neither will ever happen.
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Old 01-07-2016, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Southern New England is good for the urban inclined.

Northern New England is good for the rural inclined.

I'd love to own a house in Boston and a summer house somewhere way up in New Hampshire or Vermont. Too bad neither will ever happen.
Many of us migrate North when we retire. Along with it being rural, homes are much lower priced, taxes are lower. Often the COL is much lower.
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
I'd love to own a house in Boston and a summer house somewhere way up in New Hampshire or Vermont. Too bad neither will ever happen.
A lot of people do! A lot of people with a lot of money.
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:40 AM
 
1,323 posts, read 675,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Many of us migrate North when we retire. Along with it being rural, homes are much lower priced, taxes are lower. Often the COL is much lower.
This could be wrong, but are property taxes high in New Hampshire. There is no income tax or sales tax, the state gets paid some how.
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Old 01-08-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
This could be wrong, but are property taxes high in New Hampshire. There is no income tax or sales tax, the state gets paid some how.
In my observation, urban areas always have higher mil-rates, thus higher property taxes. So comparing property taxes from one city to another city, will generally be close.



I live in rural Maine. When I have discussed property taxes with home-owners in rural NH, the comparison has been that their NH property taxes have been significantly higher than property taxes in rural Maine.

I am a retiree on pension, my income is not high enough to pay income taxes in Maine. From what I have read a large part of this state's revenue is from corporate taxes instead of individual income taxes.

A state may be known for having high income taxes, but that does not mean everyone pays high income taxes [some of us are on pensions thus not paying income tax].
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Old 01-08-2016, 04:14 PM
 
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I really like Maine and Vermont. I think coastal MA is very snobby - Nantucket, MV, Cape Cod. I like coastal Maine better but MA has a gorgeous coast. I do like Boston, too, though. But Maine is my favorite New England state.
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