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View Poll Results: Which city is most fast paced?
Chicago 153 55.84%
Philadelphia 121 44.16%
Voters: 274. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-05-2011, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH USA / formerly Chicago for 20 years
3,706 posts, read 5,771,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FAReastcoast View Post
Yes, I have flown into Midway, the bungalow belt is basically the perimeter of the city limits. The most seen housing style in Chicago is 3 flats, not bungalows.
I'd venture that bungalows pretty much predominate in the outer half of the city, both north and south. And while three-flats are common in Chicago, I'd say that two-flats are just as common, if not more so.

There are also highrises (mostly downtown and along the lakefront), courtyard buildings, and old-style Chicago "cottages" which mostly date from the late 19th-century or so. Chicago has a pretty wide range of housing styles.

 
Old 10-05-2011, 09:33 PM
 
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Center City, because of its density/narrow streets, seems busier and more fast-paced than Chicago. Chicago is big, but the streets downtown are too wide and often appear to be slow. Chicago was designed to handle a much larger population than its peak of 3.6 million; now it's down to 2,695,000. Chicago never seems to be really crowded unless there is an event (ie. Taste of Chicago) downtown; otherwise, it can slow.
 
Old 10-05-2011, 10:01 PM
 
Location: NC/IL/MI
3,625 posts, read 7,151,792 times
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The Chcago style bungalow housing is most common in The outer neighborhoods and the inner ring burbs. You even some in NW Indiana and small portions of Dupage Co. I'd say the most common type of housing in the city is 2-3 flats

mas23
 
Old 10-05-2011, 11:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamms View Post
Center City, because of its density/narrow streets, seems busier and more fast-paced than Chicago. Chicago is big, but the streets downtown are too wide and often appear to be slow. Chicago was designed to handle a much larger population than its peak of 3.6 million; now it's down to 2,695,000. Chicago never seems to be really crowded unless there is an event (ie. Taste of Chicago) downtown; otherwise, it can slow.
The thing is...it still could be some day, and certainly could hold a much higher daytime population at some point. Then, the original city planners dream will be realized and the wide streets will seem quite smart. They were modeled so they would have a more relaxed feel than the cities of the east at the time and of course.
Take a look at the Burnham plan here for instance...

genius to me actually....

check out this eco bridge


Chicago metro is still projected to grow quite a bit, despite the naysayers, which will include a packed centrally located downtown, of which, the wider streets will be very useful. Watch Michigan Ave roadways/foot traffic for instance, or the river at rush hour going back to trains/ogislvy/union station and you will see how this works out.
Now look how Chicago used to be around the turn of the 20th century.
 
Old 10-05-2011, 11:46 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Just because Chicago is larger, doesnt make it any more fast paced.
 
Old 10-05-2011, 11:59 PM
 
Location: NC/IL/MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mas23 View Post
The Chcago style bungalow housing is more common in The outer neighborhoods and the inner ring burbs. You'll even find some in NW Indiana and small portions of Dupage Co. I'd say the most common type of housing in the city is 2-3 flats

mas23
edit
 
Old 10-06-2011, 10:15 AM
 
58 posts, read 81,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Just because Chicago is larger, doesnt make it any more fast paced.
Exactly. Philly is more fast-paced. It has the East Coast feel, not the Midwest (slow drivers, slow walkers) feel.

Just walk down Michigan Ave. in Chicago. Slow, large, herds of people.
 
Old 10-06-2011, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,827 posts, read 19,350,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LP Lane View Post
Exactly. Philly is more fast-paced. It has the East Coast feel, not the Midwest (slow drivers, slow walkers) feel.

Just walk down Michigan Ave. in Chicago. Slow, large, herds of people.
wow, this makes you look very stupid and I don't even know you.
 
Old 10-06-2011, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,827 posts, read 19,350,123 times
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BTW, I think that Chicago is faster paced purely based on experience. It has nothing to do with population etc. Having spent a lot of time in both cities, Chicago just seems slightly faster paced. The suburbs of Chicago could be the suburbs of any Midwestern city, they are not different, only more of the same. But they are faster paced because they are set up for cars. People drive much faster on the wide freeways and large roads around Chicago than they do on the more narrow highways and side streets of suburban philly. People drive 55 around philly and 75-80+ around chicago. Now sidewalk activity in suburban Chicago is a different story.

The city itself to me seems faster paced than the city of philly. It definitely feels larger and more built up. Again, the streets and highways are bigger and deal with more traffic, but the sidewalks are just as busy and fast paced as Center City.
 
Old 10-06-2011, 11:34 AM
 
11,156 posts, read 22,303,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
Bungalows dominate the city. Have you been to the southside which comprises 60% of the city's land area? Have you ever flown into Midway? They run for miles and miles, hence the term "bungalow belt."

Bungalow Belt

Bungalow: Sweet Home Chicago - WTTW
I feel like we've had this talk with you at least twice before

Bungalows dominate the area around Midway and on the northwest side of the city. Overall they're only around 24% of the housing stock, while 3-flats/courtyards/highrises are easily the top in the city as far as residential units, at around 55% of the total. The rest of the housing is brownstones at 18% and rowhouses at 4%.

The areas of the city with the most population and the most density probably have no idea there are even bungalows anywhere in the city. They're basically on the edges of the city, in an arch about 5-8 miles from downtown. I haven't been in the bungalow belt in probably 5-6 years now. It's much quieter than where most people in the city live.

I've always liked the bungalows though. The houses are normally well kept, large inside, updated and nice, but compared to suburban housing it's so jam packed together with just the small 3 foot gangways running alongside the houses. When you go in the backyards and see all the houses and backyards all smashed together, it's almost like a different little world.

http://www.pinnaclepropertyinspection.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/flash3.jpg (broken link)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_QUvr7pgPM7...e+Bungalow.jpg

I love the total lack of driveways out front.

As far as jaywalking, I'm curious where you've been in Chicago? I work downtown in the loop, and you literally can't walk down a street in the loop or river north without seeing at least one person dart across the middle of the block when there's a red light stopping traffic. Maybe you don't see it on State Street or Michigan Ave because they're obviously a lot wider. You normally don't see it on huge main streets like Ashland or Western because it's not as easy to do, but any 2-lane street in the city, residential or commercial, everyone jaywalks. I do on my way to the train station every morning with about half the other people on my side of the street.

Downtown it's not as common because there are traffic lights on each corner and it's a perfect grid. Not as much of a reason why you can't just cross at the intersection than go out of your way to dart through traffic halfway through the block.

The main differences from city to city are how many pedestrians are there, and definitely how wide is the street.

One place I really noticed that people do NOT jaywalk as often is Europe.

Last edited by Chicago60614; 10-06-2011 at 11:43 AM..
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