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Old 05-19-2016, 10:12 PM
 
10,276 posts, read 8,352,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perverse Instantiation View Post
What I'm trying to figure out is how is NYC sustaining this high growth? Like just how many apartment/condos are currently U/C there? It would have to be building like 25k-30k multi-family units concurrently to keep up with this growth...I know Brooklyn just issued like 20k or something apartments permits last year, but that still takes time to actually start construction.
Population growth usually isn't super-heavily correlated with housing construction.

You could have no new construction, yet a booming population increase. All you need is increased household sizes.

In the case of NYC, yes, there are huge levels of construction, especially outside Manhattan, but I'm not sure if that's actually the main driver of growth.
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Old 05-19-2016, 10:18 PM
 
62 posts, read 50,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Population growth usually isn't super-heavily correlated with housing construction.

You could have no new construction, yet a booming population increase. All you need is increased household sizes.

In the case of NYC, yes, there are huge levels of construction, especially outside Manhattan, but I'm not sure if that's actually the main driver of growth.
If apartment occupancies are already high(which I'm sure it is in super expensive NYC), then yes, you need new housing, else where are new people going to move to? Yes, there is a lot of overcrowding in NYC(especially with immigrants), but you still need new housing, so high residential construction is correlated with population growth.
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Old 05-19-2016, 10:37 PM
 
6,880 posts, read 14,721,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benleis View Post
1 New York city, New York 8,550,405
2 Los Angeles city, California 3,971,883
3 Chicago city, Illinois 2,720,546
4 Houston city, Texas 2,296,224
5 Philadelphia city, PA 1,567,442
6 Phoenix city, Arizona 1,563,025
7 San Antonio city, Texas 1,469,845
8 San Diego city, California 1,394,928
9 Dallas city, Texas 1,300,092
10 San Jose city, California 1,026,908
11 Austin city, Texas 931,830
12 Jacksonville city, Florida 868,031
13 San Francisco city, California 864,816
14 Indianapolis city, Indiana 853,173
15 Columbus city, Ohio 850,106
16 Fort Worth city, Texas 833,319
17 Charlotte city, North Carolina 827,097
18 Seattle city, Washington 684,451
19 Denver city, Colorado 682,545
20 El Paso city, Texas 681,124
21 Detroit city, Michigan 677,116
22 Washington city, DC 672,228
23 Boston city, Massachusetts 667,137
24 Memphis city, Tennessee 655,770
25 Nashville-Davidson, TN 654,610
26 Portland city, Oregon 632,309
27 Oklahoma City city, Oklahoma 631,346
28 Las Vegas city, Nevada 623,747
29 Baltimore city, Maryland 621,849
30 Louisville/Jefferson County KY 615,366
m


Please not that is NOT Louisville/Jefferson County population but the (balance)

Jefferson County KY has a population close to 800,000
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
2,180 posts, read 1,571,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Thoughts:

New York's "modest" growth is still numerically larger than every other city's. No one's catching its city proper in our lifetimes, if ever.

Phoenix is really nipping at Philadelphia's heels again, and should officially overtake next year, if current growth rates hold

Chicago--wow.

San Antonio is booming, and should also cross 1.5 million next year. Also a threat to overtake Phoenix (Philadelphia, for sure) in less than 20 years, if growth rates remain the same for both (which they probably won't)

Seattle and Denver are neck-and-neck, city proper-wise. Denver might overtake next year, if trends hold.

Washington, D.C. has overtaken Boston as third most populous city proper in the Northeast (or the BosWash Corridor, for you Southern debaters).
San Antonio wants to annex 120,000 people from Bexar County: San Antonio Annexation: Land grab or prudent plan? | WOAI

It will definitely be #5 at some point. It has very weak suburbs unlike Phoenix.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:13 PM
 
1,687 posts, read 1,112,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
But that's true in every city with large geography. The entire western half of Staten Island is uninhabited. Houston has vast uninhabited industrial areas.
Yea. They all have 100 Sq miles of uninhabited land.
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Old 05-19-2016, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
2,180 posts, read 1,571,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iknowftbll View Post
Colorado has a fairly impressive number of cities over 100,000, especially for a state of about 5.5 million.

Denver: 682,545
Colorado Springs: 456,568
Aurora: 359,407
Fort Collins: 161,175
Lakewood: 152,597
Thornton: 133,451
Arvada: 115,368
Westminster: 113,130
Centennial: 109,741
Pueblo: 109,412
Boulder: 107,349
Greeley: 100,883

Of course, most of these are in the Denver area, where around 3/5 of the state's population lives.
Virginia is a laggard compared to Colorado:
1. Alexandria 153,511
2. Arlington (technically a county) 229,164
3. Chesapeake 235,429
4. Hampton 136,454
5. Newport News 182,385
6. Norfolk 246,393
7. Richmond 220,289
8. Roanoke 99,897 (will likely pass 100k this year)
9. Virginia Beach 452,745

Virginia's cities are also incredibly weak. All the power resides with counties. I don't know why counties like Fairfax or Henrico just don't incorporate as cities like Virginia Beach/Princess Anne County once did
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Old 05-20-2016, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
11,090 posts, read 12,125,301 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
Virginia is a laggard compared to Colorado:
1. Alexandria 153,511
2. Arlington (technically a county) 229,164
3. Chesapeake 235,429
4. Hampton 136,454
5. Newport News 182,385
6. Norfolk 246,393
7. Richmond 220,289
8. Roanoke 99,897 (will likely pass 100k this year)
9. Virginia Beach 452,745

Virginia's cities are also incredibly weak. All the power resides with counties. I don't know why counties like Fairfax or Henrico just don't incorporate as cities like Virginia Beach/Princess Anne County once did
It seems Virginia has an immense number of people living in county areas that are not actually incorporated cities. In fact, that's my situation. Northern Virginia has entire cities that are not actually cities. Virginia's population is quite a bit larger than Colorado's, it's just Colorado has more people living in its largest incorporated cities.
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Old 05-20-2016, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Pleasant Ridge)
605 posts, read 585,902 times
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Cincinnati up 0.5% from 2010 to 298,550. Not much but good news compared the previous decades. Looking forward to us cracking 300,000 again soon. Also nice being one of 2 Ohio cities growing.

Columbus 850,106 up from 787,033 in 2010.
Cincinnati 298,550 up from 296,943

Cleveland 388,072 down from 396,815
Toledo 279,789 down from 287,208
Akron 197,542 down from 199,110
Dayton 140,599 down from 141,527

Last edited by cincydave8; 05-20-2016 at 06:22 AM..
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Old 05-20-2016, 07:31 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
5,852 posts, read 4,543,198 times
Reputation: 3728
Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
The Washington Diamond reaches a new record population!

The Washington Diamond, or Core Washington, is traditionally defined as Washington, DC, Arlington County, VA and Alexandria, VA.

Prior to the Civil War, the three jurisdictions comprised what we today call 'The District of Columbia.' Then it was five jurisdictions within the District of Columbia (Alexandria city, Alexandria County - today's Arlington, Georgetown city, Washington city, and Washington County)

You can read about the split here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distri...a_retrocession



If Core Washington (today's Alexandria, Arlington, Washington) had not split, it would today rank as one of the 10 largest cities in the United States. More importantly, this new release is the largest population EVER for Core Washington. It last peaked in 1970 at 1,041,721. It now has 1,054,903 people. NOTE: Alexandria, VA did annex territory from Fairfax County in 1952 of approximately 8.8 square miles. So it does not have a perfect diamond shape anymore.

Here's how the population has developed, with the new 2010 numbers included. The city would have had 102.05 square miles, which is still incredibly compact for the U.S.

Year: Population; Population Density per Square Mile
1900: 299,676; 2,937
1910: 356,629; 3,495
1920: 471,671; 4,622
1930: 537,633; 5,268
1940: 753,654; 7,385
1950: 999,414; 9,793
1960: 1,018,380; 9,979
1970: 1,041,721; 10,208
1980: 894,149; 8,762
1990: 889,019; 8,712
2000: 889,795; 8,719
2010: 949,316; 9,302
2014: 1,036,376; 10,156
2015: 1,054,903; 10,337


Impressive!
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Old 05-20-2016, 08:00 AM
 
448 posts, read 459,222 times
Reputation: 250
Wow I wonder how long til Austin hits the 1million mark
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