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View Poll Results: Richmond, VA versus Cincinnati OH
Richmond, VA 40 43.48%
Cincinnati 52 56.52%
Voters: 92. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-22-2016, 04:32 PM
 
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How do these two cities compare regarding activities to do, urbanity, climate, employment, cost of living, general personalities of the people, crime, and education? I have heard that the two cities have somewhat similar architecture/inner city neighborhoods, despite the fact that they are in different regions.
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Old 08-22-2016, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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An interesting conparison. Just comparing the inner cities of both areas, there are serious issues with poverty and crime. However, Cincinnati, although growing slower, appears to be making more investment downtown, especially in the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Cincinnati feels like a major city, whereas Richmond feels like a large town. Cincinnati is a much larger metro area at nearly double the size of Richmond, and the economic numbers show.

Activities to do - Cincinnati
Urbanity - Richmond is more urban
Employment - Richmond
Cost of living - Richmond
General Personalities - Richmond by a mile. Cincinnati personalities are standoffish and snooty for absolutely no reason.
Architecture Volume - Richmond
Architecture Variety - Cincinnati

This is not a fair comparison, as each city is in a different tier. Cincinnati has its flaws, but is the clear winner over Richmond.
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Old 08-23-2016, 07:45 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,312 posts, read 2,238,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
An interesting conparison. Just comparing the inner cities of both areas, there are serious issues with poverty and crime. However, Cincinnati, although growing slower, appears to be making more investment downtown, especially in the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Cincinnati feels like a major city, whereas Richmond feels like a large town. Cincinnati is a much larger metro area at nearly double the size of Richmond, and the economic numbers show.

Activities to do - Cincinnati
Urbanity - Richmond is more urban
Employment - Richmond
Cost of living - Richmond
General Personalities - Richmond by a mile. Cincinnati personalities are standoffish and snooty for absolutely no reason.
Architecture Volume - Richmond
Architecture Variety - Cincinnati

This is not a fair comparison, as each city is in a different tier. Cincinnati has its flaws, but is the clear winner over Richmond.
Cincinnati is not almost double the size of Richmond--it's about 59% larger. That's not close to "double". And that's 59% and dwindling, as Richmond is growing at more than 2.5 times the rate of Cincinnati. Anyway....

This is an interesting comparison. I've heard good and bad things about Cincinnati, but I've never had the chance to go myself. I'd expect Cincinnati to win in most categories by virtue of it being larger, and historically so, however I'm not sure this is a foregone blowout for Cincy. The general feeling I've gotten is that Cincy is towards the bottom of its tier, while Rich is towards the front of its. I'm sure they are comparably even in more than a few ways...

Cincinnati's long history of horrid race relations isn't attractive to me, I will say. It also seems to have a less amount of social and ethnic diversity. Again, I'd assume Cincinnati would take this, but I'm sure it's reasonably close...
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Old 09-27-2016, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Cincinnati is not almost double the size of Richmond--it's about 59% larger. That's not close to "double". And that's 59% and dwindling, as Richmond is growing at more than 2.5 times the rate of Cincinnati. Anyway....
Cincinnati metro area: 2.1 million
Richmond metro area: 1.2 million

Cincinnati City: 300,000
Richmond City: 212,000

Cincinnati is larger.


Quote:
This is an interesting comparison. I've heard good and bad things about Cincinnati, but I've never had the chance to go myself. I'd expect Cincinnati to win in most categories by virtue of it being larger, and historically so, however I'm not sure this is a foregone blowout for Cincy. The general feeling I've gotten is that Cincy is towards the bottom of its tier, while Rich is towards the front of its. I'm sure they are comparably even in more than a few ways...
Cincinnati is not a the bottom of its tier by any means. They are very comparable on their housing stock, variety, and notoriety. Cincinnati is a cleaner, better kept city, with a large riverfront and more urban development in those areas. Richmond has more cohesive urban neighborhoods with less break in development. Cincinnati has a much larger economy and more influence on its region.

Quote:
Cincinnati's long history of horrid race relations isn't attractive to me, I will say. It also seems to have a less amount of social and ethnic diversity. Again, I'd assume Cincinnati would take this, but I'm sure it's reasonably close...
Cincinnati is more progressive. The city scored a 100 on the HRC's annual municipality index, something that Richmond has yet to do. Cincinnati has better attractions, and better shopping. I would choose Cincinnati over Richmond.
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Old 09-28-2016, 02:30 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
504 posts, read 468,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
Cincinnati metro area: 2.1 million
Richmond metro area: 1.2 million

Cincinnati City: 300,000
Richmond City: 212,000

Cincinnati is larger.




Cincinnati is not a the bottom of its tier by any means. They are very comparable on their housing stock, variety, and notoriety. Cincinnati is a cleaner, better kept city, with a large riverfront and more urban development in those areas. Richmond has more cohesive urban neighborhoods with less break in development. Cincinnati has a much larger economy and more influence on its region.



Cincinnati is more progressive. The city scored a 100 on the HRC's annual municipality index, something that Richmond has yet to do. Cincinnati has better attractions, and better shopping. I would choose Cincinnati over Richmond.
More extant urban development along Cincinnati's riverfront perhaps, but actual riverfront parkland and social space is not only a more recent phenomenon in Cincy, but in reality is much more limited in its use for recreation in comparison to the James River Park System. And outside of downtown there are some fairly rough areas of Cincinnati that Richmond would have no answer for. In one such area, a pharmaceutical company has come in and is developing and cleaning things up, (Hamilton) and turning things around, but as a whole, Cincinnati is certainly not more well-kept by any means. Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine district is tops and places like Indian Hill, Hyde Park, Madeira, Kennwood, and all that are very nice, but obviously many older cities have nice areas like this. Richmond has its equally historic and beautiful Fan District, Carytown, Church Hill, Windsor, and Westhampton, Short Pump etc. I am in Cincinnati/Dayton frequently and have family both in Cincinnati and in the Springfield area. Cincinnati is not, I repeat, is not more progressive by any means. It is probably one of the most conservative cities in the Midwest and is not more progressive than Richmond from any practical standpoint. But they are both fairly comparable cities even if they are in different weight classes.

Shaskeesha, I would ask that instead of making broad statements about places you may not have as much first-hand experience with, that you provide examples. Please explain what "better attractions and shopping" exist in Cincinnati as opposed to Richmond. I think we have to get away from this notion that bigger always mean more or better. Apart from sports franchises, I'm not seeing much.

Last edited by aquest1; 09-28-2016 at 03:03 AM..
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Old 09-28-2016, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (P Ridge)
573 posts, read 439,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
More extant urban development along Cincinnati's riverfront perhaps, but actual riverfront parkland and social space is not only a more recent phenomenon in Cincy, but in reality is much more limited in its use for recreation in comparison to the James River Park System. And outside of downtown there are some fairly rough areas of Cincinnati that Richmond would have no answer for. In one such area, a pharmaceutical company has come in and is developing and cleaning things up, (Hamilton) and turning things around, but as a whole, Cincinnati is certainly not more well-kept by any means. Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine district is tops and places like Indian Hill, Hyde Park, Madeira, Kennwood, and all that are very nice, but obviously many older cities have nice areas like this. Richmond has its equally historic and beautiful Fan District, Carytown, Church Hill, Windsor, and Westhampton, Short Pump etc. I am in Cincinnati/Dayton frequently and have family both in Cincinnati and in the Springfield area. Cincinnati is not, I repeat, is not more progressive by any means. It is probably one of the most conservative cities in the Midwest and is not more progressive than Richmond from any practical standpoint. But they are both fairly comparable cities even if they are in different weight classes.

Shaskeesha, I would ask that instead of making broad statements about places you may not have as much first-hand experience with, that you provide examples. Please explain what "better attractions and shopping" exist in Cincinnati as opposed to Richmond. I think we have to get away from this notion that bigger always mean more or better. Apart from sports franchises, I'm not seeing much.
I've never been to Richmond, so I don't have anything to say on this comparison. But just to clarify, Cincinnati metro is conservative, but the city of Cincinnati is liberal. As previously stated it scores 100% by HRC. Hasn't had a Republican mayor since the 1970s and the city voted well over 80% for Obama and has some very progressive leaders on city council. The suburbs of Cincinnati are very conservative especially the counties between Dayton and Cincinnati (Butler and Warren).
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Old 09-28-2016, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,270 posts, read 3,333,628 times
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Quote:
Shaskeesha, I would ask that instead of making broad statements about places you may not have as much first-hand experience with, that you provide examples. Please explain what "better attractions and shopping" exist in Cincinnati as opposed to Richmond. I think we have to get away from this notion that bigger always mean more or better. Apart from sports franchises, I'm not seeing much.
Sure, Cincinnati is more urban developed along its riverfront, from the new stadium to the casino, there is more construction and investment going on. Richmond is more urban in the city and core areas, as I stated previously, and you gave excellent examples of this. Richmond, however, has nothing like a Covington, Newport or village like communities across the river like Cincinnati has. When I refer to bigger and better attractions and shopping, I am referring to Cincinnati's Kenwood town center and surrounding retail, Hyde Park Square, Cincinnati Premium Outlets, IKEA, several locations of Whole Foods, Costcos etc. Richmond only has one Whole Foods. Kroger's major presence also gives Cincinnati the one up on grocery options. Richmond also has no answer for Cincinnati's large airport, King's Island, Cincinnati Zoo, or National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Richmond does have higher ranking museums, and definitely more art galleries/districts than Cincinnati. I do have first hand experience with both cities. My family has lived in the Hyde Park area and Norwood areas for decades. My niece is also attending the Virginia Commonwealth University, and I have made several trips there, not only to see her but to work, as I am in the healthcare management field.

Long story short. I have no hatred for either city, but when some posters state things that are not true or exaggerate their experience of either city, I have to speak out. Some posters have claimed that Richmond is better than New Orleans or even cities not in the same tier such as Nashville or Charlotte, when objectively speaking that is not true. Everyone is entitled to their own experiences, and that is great even if I do not share the same experiences. Thank you for responding, succinctly, and in a civil manner.
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Old 09-28-2016, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Topography is very similar in both cities. I think Cincinnati may have higher hills, elevation, etc. Cincinnati also sits on a waterfront that is shared with another state, which is interesting. So there are two metropolitan areas to take into consideration, even though Covington, KY is a much smaller city.

Keep in mind that Cincinnati used to be a city with a much, much, larger population. But that was a while ago. Density is slightly greater in Cincinnati, and the only real advantage the city has is that it is slightly larger. Which is negligible; we're talking about 79 square miles, to 62 square miles. The city was over 500,000 in the core alone, and I simply do not see that happening in Richmond any time soon. But you know, this is C-D; people have no respect to what cities once were and they love to kick cities while they're down and compare them to cities with a larger CSA.

I should be biased towards Cincinnati, considering that is my home state, but if current trends continue Richmond will surpass Cincinnati in population and density.

People are probably going to be about the same. Even though Cincinnati is in Ohio, it is in Southern Ohio, which is a bit different from the rest of the state, and more conservative. People from both cities might have a lot more in common than most people would think. As uppity as people are in Southern Ohio they're a lot nicer than they can be up North.

When people say that Cincinnati people are snooty and standoffish for absolutely no reason, what should the reason be? Why do people need to have a reason to be standoffish? As far as the snooty thing, there are some very high paying jobs in Cincinnati and people that continue to do very well, despite how bad things are in the rest of the state, so I would expect that sort of thing particularly from people that are middle class or upper middle class.

My limited experience with Virginia, not much older than my profile on C-D, shows that people are very snooty and standoffish here as well. But they have a right to be that way. I found Harrisonburg to be standoffish and snooty. Same with Hampton Roads, as ghetto as some of the neighborhoods here are; no different than anywhere else. Maybe it is different in Richmond but there are enough well paid people here in their own little bubble, oblivious to the next person's reality it is no different than anything I've witnessed growing up and dealing with affluent people in Ohio.

I've been to both cities. I will say this much. Cincinnati has some areas that are ghetto as *&%$, as does Richmond, so they're about the same in that department. Richmond may have an advantage with closer proximity to DC, whereas Cincinnati is the DC in it's region; Dayton sure as hell doesn't have anything remotely close going on for it like Cincinnati does other than their Air Force base. Conversely, Cincinnati has some of the nicest neighborhoods you'll find in Ohio, just as Richmond has some of the nicest neighborhoods you'll find in Virginia.

As far as Cincinnati or Richmond being more urban you'd have to pay extremely close attention to notice it. Richmond does have a smaller footprint to make that argument over, and Cincinnati has a nice waterfront and a dense, tight downtown, like Cleveland. The biggest difference is going to be in suburbia. I'm not sure about Richmond, but much of Cincinnati's suburbia is fueled by the fact of how *&% ghetto some of those neighborhoods are.

The racial problems are unique, but the real difference between Cincinnati and the rest of the state is in how those differences are articulated, not so much the fact that the problems exist. Ohio is a very, very, White state, outside of the inner city. Virginia actually has a higher percentage of Blacks, and a lot that live in rural areas, in comparison to Ohio. A Black person could actually do better for themselves in Virginia than in Ohio, or may have an easier time getting ahead, as ironic as that may seem to some people. When a state has a 20% higher White population (Ohio) than a state with a 20% larger population of people of color (Virginia) things are a bit different.

Last edited by goofy328; 09-28-2016 at 11:06 AM..
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Old 09-28-2016, 11:03 AM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,565,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
An interesting conparison. Just comparing the inner cities of both areas, there are serious issues with poverty and crime. However, Cincinnati, although growing slower, appears to be making more investment downtown, especially in the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Cincinnati feels like a major city, whereas Richmond feels like a large town. Cincinnati is a much larger metro area at nearly double the size of Richmond, and the economic numbers show.

Activities to do - Cincinnati
Urbanity - Richmond is more urban
Employment - Richmond
Cost of living - Richmond
General Personalities - Richmond by a mile. Cincinnati personalities are standoffish and snooty for absolutely no reason.
Architecture Volume - Richmond
Architecture Variety - Cincinnati

This is not a fair comparison, as each city is in a different tier. Cincinnati has its flaws, but is the clear winner over Richmond.
I'd say on a pound for pound basis, Richmond wins. It packs a lot of punch in terms of urbanity, architecture, and amenities. It has a smaller population than a lot of cities in its tier yet punches at or above their weight.

However, let's be clear-Cincinnati wins on the overall. As a larger metro it just has more to offer, period. Major museums, pro sports, stronger public transit, and more choices in amenities are just some of the things Cincy has that Richmond doesn't.

Also, Cincinnati is more urban than Richmond. Richmond is quite urban, but Cincinnati is more so. OTR is one of the most dense historic neighborhoods in the nation not in Chi, NYC, or SF. The rest of your assessments I generally agree with other than architecture volume.
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Old 09-28-2016, 11:17 AM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
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I know Richmond well, but not Cincy. Which city has the more impressive urban neighborhoods? I've long been interested in Cincy because it's an older boom-town with some strong urbanity.
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