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Old 02-16-2019, 10:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Is it really? The Boston CSA has 8.2 million, and this seems like the CSA definition but slightly more tailored so that it only includes urban and urban-adjacent areas. You can see a map of the areas around Boston that were included if you follow the link that the OP posted.
yeah but Gardner, Westport, Oxford or Chatham are not "urban" but in the CSA
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Old 02-17-2019, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
yeah but Gardner, Westport, Oxford or Chatham are not "urban" but in the CSA
Gardner is urban enough I think. If you really want to poke holes in this “agglomeration” thing, the fact that they include Putnam and Danielson, CT is the weirdest thing for me.
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Old 02-17-2019, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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I note that the table lists its sources (classifications?) for urban agglomerations in the "Status" column, and for those in the United States, the status is "CUA".

I assume this means "Census Urban(ized) Area". Other countries whose agglomerations are classed as this include Algeria, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, the UK and Venezuela.

But the administrator (agglomerator?) of this site does not rely on the U.S. Census Bureau's definitions of "urbanized area" for a given MSA or CSA in compiling these figures, but rather must rely on some other figures he can use to establish ties between Census-defined urbanized areas regardless what MSA or CSA the bureau puts them in.

Some examples:

--The Philadelphia urban agglomeration is marked on the list as "incl. Allentown, Trenton". Both urbanized areas do have ties to Philadelphia: Trenton remains in its DMA (Dominant Market Area, the guide buyers of broadcast airtime use to determine the reach of metropolitan TV stations) and has historically had closer ties to it than to New York, and even though the Lehigh Valley has its own PBS and independent TV stations, the network affiliates (all O&O) are all located in Philadelphia (and the parent company of one of the networks is headquartered in it). Yet Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton has never been included in the Philadelphia CSA, and the Census Bureau moved Trenton from Philadelphia's CSA to New York's after the 1990 census. On the map, Philadelphia's urban spiderweb stretches into Reading, Vineland (NJ) and Wilmington (DE), all of which the Census Bureau includes in the CSA, but not Atlantic City (NJ), which the Census Bureau also includes in the CSA.

--Lawrence, Kan., appears as an island in the Kansas City urban archipelago. The presence of the University of Kansas in that city keeps it from being included in the Kansas City CSA, for it keeps the percentage of commuters between Douglas County KS and the KC MSA counties below the threshold, but anyone living in the region would probably say that there are now pretty strong ties between the two (and KU's medical school has long been in Kansas City KS). There were similar strong ties between Kansas City and Leavenworth, which appears on the map as an adjacent but separate island, for as long as I lived in the area (the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority ran a local bus route from downtown KCK to Leavenworth), but the presence of both Fort Leavenworth and the Federal penitentiary there kept Leavenworth County KS out of the Kansas City MSA for many years; it only got added to it in 2000.

Both of these urban agglomerations have higher populations on this list than on the Census Bureau's list of urbanized areas, and I suspect the same is the case for many of the others in the US.
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Old 02-17-2019, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I note that the table lists its sources (classifications?) for urban agglomerations in the "Status" column, and for those in the United States, the status is "CUA".

I assume this means "Census Urban(ized) Area". Other countries whose agglomerations are classed as this include Algeria, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, the UK and Venezuela.
It means Combined Urban Areas. That's the status of all of the American ones. An Urban Agglomeration is a combination of two or more urban areas. It implies that a central and core urban area is merged with adjacent ones that it may share extensive urban fabric with.

How to put this in analogous terms: think of what a CSA is and how it is a combination of two or more MSAs. Same logic is applied to Urban Agglomerations, which are two or more urban areas that are combined due to sharing contiguous and coterminous urban fabric and/or geographic proximity.
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Old 02-17-2019, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Boston's over 7 million people in 3 out of the 6 population counting metrics:

1. Combined Statistical Area

2. Demographia's Urban Area

3. Global Urban Agglomeration (the metric this thread is about)

After excluding the city-proper metric, it stands to reason that Boston is one of the harder cities to pin down to any specific number as its population across various metrics range from 4.1 million as it is in the United States' version of the Urban Area all the way to 8.2 million with the Combined Statistical Area metric. Not to mention several points in between with a number of the other metrics such as Demographia's Urban Area or the Global Urban Agglomeration, both of which have Boston north of 7 million people, and the MSA where Boston is only 4.8 million.
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Old 02-18-2019, 07:19 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,246 posts, read 2,116,242 times
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^ does n.e.c.t.a. make sense ?
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Old 02-18-2019, 08:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
^ does n.e.c.t.a. make sense ?
NECTA is the same MSA/CSA definitions but applied to the town level
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Old Today, 01:14 AM
 
Location: East Coast
174 posts, read 233,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I note that the table lists its sources (classifications?) for urban agglomerations in the "Status" column, and for those in the United States, the status is "CUA".

I assume this means "Census Urban(ized) Area". Other countries whose agglomerations are classed as this include Algeria, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, the UK and Venezuela.

But the administrator (agglomerator?) of this site does not rely on the U.S. Census Bureau's definitions of "urbanized area" for a given MSA or CSA in compiling these figures, but rather must rely on some other figures he can use to establish ties between Census-defined urbanized areas regardless what MSA or CSA the bureau puts them in.

Some examples:

--The Philadelphia urban agglomeration is marked on the list as "incl. Allentown, Trenton". Both urbanized areas do have ties to Philadelphia: Trenton remains in its DMA (Dominant Market Area, the guide buyers of broadcast airtime use to determine the reach of metropolitan TV stations) and has historically had closer ties to it than to New York, and even though the Lehigh Valley has its own PBS and independent TV stations, the network affiliates (all O&O) are all located in Philadelphia (and the parent company of one of the networks is headquartered in it). Yet Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton has never been included in the Philadelphia CSA, and the Census Bureau moved Trenton from Philadelphia's CSA to New York's after the 1990 census. On the map, Philadelphia's urban spiderweb stretches into Reading, Vineland (NJ) and Wilmington (DE), all of which the Census Bureau includes in the CSA, but not Atlantic City (NJ), which the Census Bureau also includes in the CSA.

--Lawrence, Kan., appears as an island in the Kansas City urban archipelago. The presence of the University of Kansas in that city keeps it from being included in the Kansas City CSA, for it keeps the percentage of commuters between Douglas County KS and the KC MSA counties below the threshold, but anyone living in the region would probably say that there are now pretty strong ties between the two (and KU's medical school has long been in Kansas City KS). There were similar strong ties between Kansas City and Leavenworth, which appears on the map as an adjacent but separate island, for as long as I lived in the area (the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority ran a local bus route from downtown KCK to Leavenworth), but the presence of both Fort Leavenworth and the Federal penitentiary there kept Leavenworth County KS out of the Kansas City MSA for many years; it only got added to it in 2000.

Both of these urban agglomerations have higher populations on this list than on the Census Bureau's list of urbanized areas, and I suspect the same is the case for many of the others in the US.

Eventually, suburban/exurban sprawl from Johnson County will grow into Douglas County. But considering that the KC MSA isn't growing at a super fast rate, I would think we're at least 2 censuses away from that happening.
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