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View Poll Results: Austin vs Kansas City
Austin 141 50.72%
Kansas City 137 49.28%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-30-2018, 07:55 AM
sub
 
530 posts, read 285,112 times
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Of course the boulevards and parkways.
I go into KC geek mode just thinking about it.
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Old 08-30-2018, 08:00 AM
 
10 posts, read 3,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sub View Post
Yes on public transit. Every city needs more of that.
Not sure what more can be done with 35. It's already a double-decker with no room for more.
Maybe make the next addition a tunnel?
Or perhaps an obscenely tall, stomach-churning viaduct since Texas thinks it's okay to build those things as tall as skyscrapers.
That state......

Then there's the toll road which some of us outsiders hate.
Just give me a toll booth so I can pay it on the spot and never have to think about it again.

Thinking of this brings out my frustrations of Texas, so Kansas City it is, with it's ambitious, overbuilt, and generally well-planned highway system that makes it far more pleasant to get around in.
No tool booths in Texas. You either have a toll tag or a bill is sent to the address on your license plate.
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Old 08-30-2018, 10:08 AM
 
1,594 posts, read 1,042,591 times
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Most people I know, Texan or not, seem to enjoy driving on the tall, stacked high ways. I've never heard anyone complain about having to drive on them.
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Old 08-31-2018, 11:49 AM
 
193 posts, read 154,762 times
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Originally Posted by Connie 2010 View Post
They need more public transit and I35 needs rebuilding.
I almost gave you a rep point but realized you were talking about Austin and not KC... LOL
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Old 10-20-2018, 10:37 AM
 
963 posts, read 1,166,020 times
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Wow. Long and sometimes interesting thread, especially the opinions about Texas. Been living in TX for 16 years. I find lots to critique and also other things that I've come to like. TX provokes extreme reactions, and the reality is in the middle. In my case, I kind of love and hate it simultaneously, sometimes depending on what area I'm in.

I like both Austin and KC. I spent 7 years in Austin and it took awhile for its strengths to settle in for me. After a bit, we loved it and now we miss it. Great music and film scene, good places to hike, mountain bike, paddle/tube, go for a swim. Lots of intelligent people from diverse backgrounds, especially if you're plugged into UT grad programs. I could see how folks who work with other fields in Austin might have a very different experience.

I don't know KC as well, but have spent a couple of days there every year for the past 15 years. We really like Lawrence, which is a very mini Austin, IMO. KC seems like a solid, underrated city with some interesting areas. The vibe I get is a bit generic and definitely less vibrant than Austin, but that may be because I haven't had time to get to know its more idiosyncratic corners. Having lived in Europe and Latin America, I was intrigued by the plaza, but it felt kitschy. I still don't know if I like that area or not. Kind of gave me an Epcot Center / artificial/ movie set vibe. I'd visited la giralda tower in Seville, Spain, and the original one in Marrakesh, so seeing KC's version was neat.

Something that struck me driving into the city, however, is how pretty, verdant, and hilly some of the neighborhoods are. It reminded me of some of my favorite neighborhoods in my home town of Minneapolis around the lakes. Lots of folks into gardening/ landscaping and taking pride in the aesthetics of their home.

I voted Austin, but I admit that if I knew KC well it might be a more difficult choice.
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Old 10-20-2018, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,873 posts, read 1,880,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Campeador View Post
Wow. Long and sometimes interesting thread, especially the opinions about Texas. Been living in TX for 16 years. I find lots to critique and also other things that I've come to like. TX provokes extreme reactions, and the reality is in the middle. In my case, I kind of love and hate it simultaneously, sometimes depending on what area I'm in.

I like both Austin and KC. I spent 7 years in Austin and it took awhile for its strengths to settle in for me. After a bit, we loved it and now we miss it. Great music and film scene, good places to hike, mountain bike, paddle/tube, go for a swim. Lots of intelligent people from diverse backgrounds, especially if you're plugged into UT grad programs. I could see how folks who work with other fields in Austin might have a very different experience.

I don't know KC as well, but have spent a couple of days there every year for the past 15 years. We really like Lawrence, which is a very mini Austin, IMO. KC seems like a solid, underrated city with some interesting areas. The vibe I get is a bit generic and definitely less vibrant than Austin, but that may be because I haven't had time to get to know its more idiosyncratic corners. Having lived in Europe and Latin America, I was intrigued by the plaza, but it felt kitschy. I still don't know if I like that area or not. Kind of gave me an Epcot Center / artificial/ movie set vibe. I'd visited la giralda tower in Seville, Spain, and the original one in Marrakesh, so seeing KC's version was neat.

Something that struck me driving into the city, however, is how pretty, verdant, and hilly some of the neighborhoods are. It reminded me of some of my favorite neighborhoods in my home town of Minneapolis around the lakes. Lots of folks into gardening/ landscaping and taking pride in the aesthetics of their home.

I voted Austin, but I admit that if I knew KC well it might be a more difficult choice.
This KC native and expat appreciates your opinion and would like to give you a little more information about the Country Club Plaza to either modify or reinforce your opinion of it.

The Country Club Plaza is the shopping district that serves as the gateway to Kansas City developer Jesse Clyde (J.C.) Nichols' crowning achievement, the Country Club District, which lies to the Plaza's immediate south. Begun in 1921, the Plaza is the oldest (or second oldest, depending on how one classifies the much smaller shopping center in Baltimore's Roland Park) planned shopping center in the United States.

J.C. Nichols played a huge role in making Kansas City beautiful; his contribution is exceeded only by that of George Kessler, designer of the city's system of parks and boulevards, and Kansas City Star founder William Rockhill Nelson, who through his newspaper campaigned mightily for that park system and other municipal improvements - and left the city the bequest that gave it its magnificent art museum upon his death in 1915.

Nichols chose the Moorish Revival architectural style for the buildings on the Plaza because he considered it particularly picturesque. (KC's Giralda Tower is a 3/5 scale version of the original; it was given to the city by its sister city in Spain, Seville, as a gift in 1965. Where else would you put a gift like that in KC?) If you travel around the residential district to the south, you will find it dotted with sculptures, small fountains, reflecting pools and the like, all of ancient European style (and perhaps origin, depending on how and where he acquired them).

Because it's a master-planned development, I understand where you get that movie-set vibe. But as urbanism, it works far better than just about every regional-scale shopping center that followed it, Suburban Square on Philadelphia's Main Line being one of the very few exceptions. It's tied into the city street grid, its shops face those streets, and the (abundant free) parking is tucked behind, above or under the shops.

Nichols was a brilliant visionary, and the Urban Land Institute's highest honor, the Nichols Fellowship, is named for him. Unfortunately, he subscribed to the racist views of his time when it came to selling the property he acquired, and he put in racially restrictive covenants - "the most scientific protections," his marketing literature called them - on all the land deeds he issued.

I should hold that against him but don't, for really the whole of American society stands guilty there.

Something else I would say about my forever hometown is that it punches well above its weight on a number of fronts. On your next visit, you might want to spend some time in Westport, the oldest part of Kansas City - it predates the town's settlement (as "Westport Landing") in 1838 and was absorbed into Kansas City 60 years after that founding - and its chief entertainment district. The Plaza is also pretty lively at night, as is the Crossroads Arts District* on the southern end of downtown. (There you will find our performing arts center - the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Moshe Safdie, may be one of the few buildings anywhere that looks more intriguing from the back than it does from the front.)

You should also see if there's a jam session at the Mutual Musicians Foundation, the former black American Federation of Musicians union hall in the 1800 block of Highland Avenue in the Jazz District. When they're jammin', the music goes on all night (and the booze flows just as long - the city got the Missouri legislature to carve out the first exception to the state's 1 a.m. closing time for this place. It later got expanded so that bars in "convention trade districts" may serve until 3 a.m.; most of Kansas City south of the river, and a chunk of its Northland north of it, is defined as such a district).

From what I hear, Austin's pop music scene is livelier than Kansas City's, and KC's jazz scene is not as vital to either the city or the music now as it was during the Pendergast era (ask me about Boss Tom), though it has come back from the undead. But I'd also say that when you add the other things going on, the whole in KC is greater than the sum of its parts.

*Something I didn't learn until I went back home in 2015 to research a feature for Next City on the Power and Light District, another entertainment zone in the heart of downtown: the First Friday art gallery crawl in the Crossroads is as old as the identical one in Philadelphia's Old City; both date to 1981. I think that makes these co-holders of the title of oldest of these monthly evening art crawls.
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Old 10-20-2018, 05:55 PM
 
963 posts, read 1,166,020 times
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Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
This KC native and expat appreciates your opinion and would like to give you a little more information about the Country Club Plaza to either modify or reinforce your opinion of it.
Thanks for all of that info! If I could rep you more, I would.
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Old 10-20-2018, 06:52 PM
 
2,139 posts, read 1,172,290 times
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Wow, long poll thread. At one point Austin was trailing by 21 votes but it's now leading by 3.
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Old 11-04-2018, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Camp Springs MD
13 posts, read 3,281 times
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Austin. It's a newer fresher city.
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Old 11-06-2018, 07:35 AM
 
6,335 posts, read 13,299,151 times
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Originally Posted by pgusa88 View Post
Austin. It's a newer fresher city.
This...KC has just as much....just more spread out. KC in some ways feels more legacy and somewhat architecturally and culturally superior...but day to day, and especially weekend to weekend....Austin is simply wealthier, more educated, growing, with more music and entertainment and much better weather with beach proximity. Love it or hate it, these cities are popular now! Having UT-Texas in town is a huge advantage for Austin as no university in the urban core of KC can remotely compare.
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