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View Poll Results: Austin vs Kansas City
Austin 163 53.09%
Kansas City 144 46.91%
Voters: 307. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-19-2018, 12:03 AM
 
4,671 posts, read 4,678,592 times
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Kansas City
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:08 PM
 
7 posts, read 1,633 times
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Living in Austin, I agree with some of the other posters that Austin is an overrated city; has become overcrowded full of aggressive drivers, overvalued housing costs, and high property taxes.

Kansas City is my choice
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Old 12-27-2018, 12:09 PM
 
1 posts, read 263 times
Reputation: 10
Austin
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Old 12-29-2018, 10:29 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,743 posts, read 1,891,923 times
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It looks like Austin is beginning to slowly pull away, 145 to 138. That's the biggest lead in the game, so far, for either team.

Go Austin !!!
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Old 12-30-2018, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
737 posts, read 1,239,604 times
Reputation: 535
KC due to the Chiefs and not being overpopulated.
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Old 12-30-2018, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,086 posts, read 1,983,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
KC due to the Chiefs and not being overpopulated.
(emphasis added)

You live in Montgomery County, Pa., I see.

See you one Sunday at Big Charlie's Saloon in South Philly?

(Behind the bar at Big Charlie's, at 11th and McKean streets, there's an Emmy Award statuette amidst the bottles of booze.

(It's there because of the documentary NFL Films produced about this most unlikely den of the Wolfpack, known to its regulars as "Arrowhead East."

(When the Chiefs and Eagles meet in interconference play, this is the one bar in Philadelphia where you'd best not be wearing Eagles green. And they'll only let you into the inner sanctum in the back on game days if you can prove you bleed red and gold.)
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Old 12-30-2018, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
486 posts, read 596,013 times
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I live in KC and have for about 20 years. It's core relatively from the RiverMarket, downtown, Crossroads, midtown, Westport to the Plaza has seen a tremendous amount of investment in the last few decades. Not at the same level as new construction as Austin, but KC has spent billions just renovating old, early 20th buildings into apartments and office. New construction has now taken off in the last 5 years or so.

I like Austin, but to me it's missing the urban fabric that older, more established cities have. KC's mix of old warehouses, 1930's Art Deco towers, late 1970s-1980s high rise office towers, plus the newer infill construction going on, I'll have to take KC. But if I was ever to move to Texas, Austin would probably be the only city I would consider.
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Old 12-30-2018, 10:05 AM
 
138 posts, read 37,640 times
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Austin is overrated in real life. KC is overrated on this forum.

I don't really like either but I liked the vibe in Austin a bit better .
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Old 12-30-2018, 12:11 PM
 
Location: IN
20,445 posts, read 35,063,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kombuchaluchador View Post
Austin is overrated in real life. KC is overrated on this forum.

I don't really like either but I liked the vibe in Austin a bit better .
Austin is a big leader in job growth overall, in-migration, and population growth. Real estate appreciates at a much faster rate there. KC locals are usually just fine with slow growth status quo model. It makes it far less dynamic than Austin, though.
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Old 12-30-2018, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,086 posts, read 1,983,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Austin is a big leader in job growth overall, in-migration, and population growth. Real estate appreciates at a much faster rate there. KC locals are usually just fine with slow growth status quo model. It makes it far less dynamic than Austin, though.
I generally agree with your overall assessment of Kansas Citians' attitudes towards growth, but there are some advantages to living in a slow-growth area.

One is that when the inevitable downturns hit, they aren't as severe.

Another is that many of the slow-growth areas aren't reliant on a single industry for their prosperity. If one sector sneezes, the metropolitan economy doesn't catch a cold. This isn't true of all the slow-growth areas, but I would say it's true of Kansas City.

One of these advantages is unique to Kansas City: Almost no crippling traffic jams. I've seen photos of backups on the south leg of I-435, but other than that, traffic flows pretty smoothly throughout the metropolitan region at all hours of the day. I know I've mentioned this before, but some studies have found that Kansas City has the lowest level of congestion delays of any large (1M+) city (metro) in the Western Hemisphere. (This, btw, is one reason rail mass transit has proved such a tough sell outside a small part of the core city, much to the consternation of Clay Chastain.)

The region also has a generally high QOL.

As for real estate appreciation: This is a double-edged sword, and we haven't figured out how to sheathe it without causing injury. We've sold it as an asset, which means we expect its value to rise over time. Yet it's also a consumable - its natural course is to depreciate in value over time unless one invests almost continuously in not only its maintenance but also periodic improvements. These two imperatives mean that unless new buyers earn more money, they will find it harder to buy into the market unless a new supply of cheaper housing is provided. The "filtering" process is supposed to provide it, but that process seems to have broken down in many of our large housing markets.
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