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Old 07-12-2017, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,893 posts, read 32,892,157 times
Reputation: 12542

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I could post tons of dead or severely damaged palm trees from the coastal south after 2014 and 2015 which I took myself on visits there. The South is a failed subtropical climate imo. Winters are all over the place with 20F one day and 70F a few days later. Palms and other subtropical plants are severely stressed by that. And just look at the record low temps there. Savannah GA 3F lol.

Not a single palm other than sabal palmetto would survive those kinds of temps, and not a question of if they return but when. The climate of the South has always done this. It is why citrus miserably failed in the colonial period in Charleston and Savannah. True subtropical climates like Spain, Italy, S. Calif, Australia, etc blow the South out of the water in this regard. Barcelona has parrots flying around and mangoes, bird of paradise, banana, papaya plants everywhere, at the same latitude as NYC.
Oh, here we go again. Kindly remove that enormous bug up your ass you have about the Low Country and leave us alone.
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Old 07-12-2017, 04:43 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,051 posts, read 1,293,387 times
Reputation: 1657
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I could post tons of dead or severely damaged palm trees from the coastal south after 2014 and 2015 which I took myself on visits there. The South is a failed subtropical climate imo. Winters are all over the place with 20F one day and 70F a few days later. Palms and other subtropical plants are severely stressed by that. And just look at the record low temps there. Savannah GA 3F lol.

Not a single palm other than sabal palmetto would survive those kinds of temps, and not a question of if they return but when. The climate of the South has always done this. It is why citrus miserably failed in the colonial period in Charleston and Savannah. True subtropical climates like Spain, Italy, S. Calif, Australia, etc blow the South out of the water in this regard. Barcelona has parrots flying around and mangoes, bird of paradise, banana, papaya plants everywhere, at the same latitude as NYC.
LMAO.

Dude, stop it.
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Old 07-17-2017, 10:48 AM
 
9 posts, read 4,434 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I could post tons of dead or severely damaged palm trees from the coastal south after 2014 and 2015 which I took myself on visits there. The South is a failed subtropical climate imo. Winters are all over the place with 20F one day and 70F a few days later. Palms and other subtropical plants are severely stressed by that. And just look at the record low temps there. Savannah GA 3F lol.

Not a single palm other than sabal palmetto would survive those kinds of temps, and not a question of if they return but when. The climate of the South has always done this. It is why citrus miserably failed in the colonial period in Charleston and Savannah. True subtropical climates like Spain, Italy, S. Calif, Australia, etc blow the South out of the water in this regard. Barcelona has parrots flying around and mangoes, bird of paradise, banana, papaya plants everywhere, at the same latitude as NYC.
sabal palmetto is not alone

needle palm

sabal minor

pindo palm

all kinds of windmill palms

fortuneii

tesan

takil..ect

washingtonia robusta and filfera

All kinds of date palms

even queen palms up to hilton head microclimates.

saw palmetto

and as for bananas, we have them in connecticut lol
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Old 07-17-2017, 05:30 PM
 
3,619 posts, read 1,369,000 times
Reputation: 2183
There are more native palms in the South than there are in Mediterranean europe, the gulf stream is a wonder of nature not only for the warm ocean temps but its influence on the southern natural world . As soon as it goes out into the atlantic around northeastern north carolina, the natural range of palms on the united states east coast stops.

Last edited by floridanative10; 07-17-2017 at 05:41 PM..
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Old 07-17-2017, 05:37 PM
 
3,619 posts, read 1,369,000 times
Reputation: 2183
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I could post tons of dead or severely damaged palm trees from the coastal south after 2014 and 2015 which I took myself on visits there. The South is a failed subtropical climate imo. Winters are all over the place with 20F one day and 70F a few days later. Palms and other subtropical plants are severely stressed by that. And just look at the record low temps there. Savannah GA 3F lol.

Not a single palm other than sabal palmetto would survive those kinds of temps, and not a question of if they return but when. The climate of the South has always done this. It is why citrus miserably failed in the colonial period in Charleston and Savannah. True subtropical climates like Spain, Italy, S. Calif, Australia, etc blow the South out of the water in this regard. Barcelona has parrots flying around and mangoes, bird of paradise, banana, papaya plants everywhere, at the same latitude as NYC.
Those parrots were introduced by the pet trade. All the Barcelona species are the descendants of escapees or released birds, Red-Masked Parakeets, Mitred Parrots, Nanday Parakeets Rose-Ringed Parakeets, Blue-Crowned Conures, , Senegal Parrots and the Ring-necked parakeets
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Old 07-18-2017, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
2,810 posts, read 2,805,108 times
Reputation: 1944
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlizzardsAndSuch View Post
The above poster demonstrates why so many people dislike california and californians.
I dislike California simply because of their lack of law and order. They don't support laws of the United States, and go against law enforcement all the time. It's sad. No matter how pretty their coastline is I would never live there because of the people and their governments!


I vote for Sabal Palms in the southeast anyday!
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:42 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,042,039 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Oh, here we go again. Kindly remove that enormous bug up your ass you have about the Low Country and leave us alone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
LMAO.

Dude, stop it.
But Captain Falcon is right, though; the cold that comes to the US South is really quite limiting when it comes to growing many favored tender plant varieties. The fact that even Miami has seen upper 20s (F) temps in its history is quite scary; those temps may end up not happening, but gardeners there are forever stuck with that potential in mind...
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:50 PM
Status: "Soon I'll hear old winter's song.." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
5,391 posts, read 2,847,123 times
Reputation: 7086
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I could post tons of dead or severely damaged palm trees from the coastal south after 2014 and 2015 which I took myself on visits there. The South is a failed subtropical climate imo. Winters are all over the place with 20F one day and 70F a few days later. Palms and other subtropical plants are severely stressed by that. And just look at the record low temps there. Savannah GA 3F lol.

Not a single palm other than sabal palmetto would survive those kinds of temps, and not a question of if they return but when. The climate of the South has always done this. It is why citrus miserably failed in the colonial period in Charleston and Savannah. True subtropical climates like Spain, Italy, S. Calif, Australia, etc blow the South out of the water in this regard. Barcelona has parrots flying around and mangoes, bird of paradise, banana, papaya plants everywhere, at the same latitude as NYC.
That's why its called a SUBTROPICAL climate, not a tropical climate. I love the freezes we get. Keeps it interesting.
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,893 posts, read 32,892,157 times
Reputation: 12542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
But Captain Falcon is right, though; the cold that comes to the US South is really quite limiting when it comes to growing many favored tender plant varieties. The fact that even Miami has seen upper 20s (F) temps in its history is quite scary; those temps may end up not happening, but gardeners there are forever stuck with that potential in mind...
All well and good, but my comment referred to his posting history and a fondness for denigrating the coastlines of Georgia and South Carolina.
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Old 07-19-2017, 07:10 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,042,039 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
All well and good, but my comment referred to his posting history and a fondness for denigrating the coastlines of Georgia and South Carolina.
Don't worry, he'll come back to praising Charleston and Savannah as beautiful historic cities, after he finishes getting the "ugly coastline" and "US division" talk out of his system.

Captain Falcon has very oscillatory viewpoints.
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