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Old 07-20-2017, 11:08 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
Yes. It's a subtropical desert climate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Yes, it's Subtropical Desert. It's just not Humid Subtropical. Our low temps range from 43 to 86, never going below 29 and our highs range from 65 to 108, never going below 44, and we have Washingtonia, CIDP and Roystonea palms everywhere. If that's not Subtropical, than what is?
There you go. lol...

The actual Subtropical Region I'm used to is way more greener and wet.
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Old 07-20-2017, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
There you go. lol...

The actual Subtropical Region I'm used to is way more greener and wet.
You are talking Humid Subtropical, Mediterranean climates and Hot Semi-Arid and Hot Desert climates are Subtropical as well, just not Humid Subtropical. There are Tropical deserts as well, like Khartoum, Mecca and Dubai
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Old 07-21-2017, 02:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Yes as your graphic clearly shows, the South is the closest to the equator in the world with a large deviation in day to day temps. Look at China, Australia, Med region of Europe, South America, Africa, etc clearly shows we have the most up and down of any place on earth.

Those swings in temps in the Southeast make it very challenging to grow subtropical plants there. Every single winter is a crap shoot in which they don't know if their plants are going to be taken out by the polar vortex. This winter coming up could be the one to kill cidp's or orange trees on the gulf coast or SC and GA. Happened before and will happen again.
The coastal south will never replace a Mediterranean climate like California for commercial growing, ,though florida and sao paulo dominate the orange and orange juice market and Florida is the world leader in grapefruit production, but the coastal south is amazing for the home grower. There is even a small growing olive oil industry, the British settlers arrived in Georgia in 1736 and found olives and orange trees growing.

These cold snaps are certainly not as brutal as you make them , the south has the most native palms of any north American region, they are all over florida. Texas has more native species of palm than even Hawaii which only has one native palm, people think of coconut palms and hawaii but most palms were introduced there
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridanative10 View Post
The coastal south will never replace a Mediterranean climate like California for commercial growing, ,though florida and sao paulo dominate the orange and orange juice market and Florida is the world leader in grapefruit production, but the coastal south is amazing for the home grower. There is even a small growing olive oil industry, the British settlers arrived in Georgia in 1736 and found olives and orange trees growing.

These cold snaps are certainly not as brutal as you make them , the south has the most native palms of any north American region, they are all over florida. Texas has more native species of palm than even Hawaii which only has one native palm, people think of coconut palms and hawaii but most palms were introduced there

Almost every city in the coastal southeast averages at least one ice day per every five or ten years. A cold blast in a subtropical climate where the daily high does not go above freezing is brutal no matter how you cut it.
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Old 07-24-2017, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Almost every city in the coastal southeast averages at least one ice day per every five or ten years. A cold blast in a subtropical climate where the daily high does not go above freezing is brutal no matter how you cut it.
January 7th was a crazy day this year for that region. Dallas had a high of 40(after 27 on the 6th), Atlanta 31, Houston 44, and Miami had a high of 87, all on the same day!
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Old 07-26-2017, 02:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Almost every city in the coastal southeast averages at least one ice day per every five or ten years. A cold blast in a subtropical climate where the daily high does not go above freezing is brutal no matter how you cut it.
Yes it wont replace California fro commercial citrus growing but the coastal south is phenomenal for for the home grower and it is amazing for palms and the variety of trees and lush landscape. No other region in America even comes close for native palms. Hardy citrus from east asia has certainly adapted, my friends from California and Arizona have an amazing variety of palm and citrus but always remark how green everything is in the South. A ton of rain with the gulf stream and the thunderstorms just dumping rain after a humid day, most southern cities even surpass Seattle for rainfall averages

I think the highest rainfall averages for cities are all in the south outside of hawaii and a few pacific northwestern locations
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