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Old 07-19-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
637 posts, read 397,061 times
Reputation: 840

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Northern cities don't get summer rains like Southern cities. The warmer the climate, the more seasonal precipitation becomes: in humid regions, this leads to a monsoonal trend, where the bulk of rain falls in the warm season. Just compare Tampa, FL with Boston, MA to see what I mean:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tampa,_Florida
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston

The Northern trees aren't robust like those down South. Too much cold in winter limits the growth. Find me a northern city with a tree like this:
https://goo.gl/iLnXwr

And most vines are from tropical/subtropical regions like the South.
the trees that grow in the North are natives and are perfectly adapted to the climate .. in the summer they grow fast and furious ... and they wouldn't survive in warmer climates. they need the dormant period.
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Old 07-19-2017, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,271 posts, read 15,523,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Only factor that helps the south is most northeasterners are more apt to be outdoors.
Yeah, exposure is the difference, IMO.

When I lived in the South, I lived in an apartment with central air. I just had to walk out the door to my car and then ride in air conditioning until I got to my office, which was also air conditioned. Then after work, back in the air conditioned car to the air conditioned gym, and maybe to an air conditioned restaurant, before driving back to my air conditioned apartment. Maybe spent 5-10 minutes out in the heat all day.

Up here, I have an air conditioned apartment, office, gym, restaurant, but no car. Forgetting the other stops, just going from home to the office and back, I walk about 1/2 mile from my home to the train station, and about 1/2 mile from the train to the office. Return home is the same in reverse. So I'm walking 2 miles in the heat, in business attire. When the swamp-jungle weather sets in, it's pretty miserable.
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Old 07-19-2017, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,271 posts, read 15,523,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
The Northern trees aren't robust like those down South. Too much cold in winter limits the growth. Find me a northern city with a tree like this:
https://goo.gl/iLnXwr
Here's one:
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Old 07-19-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Austell, Georgia
2,062 posts, read 2,835,161 times
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Orlando is the absolute muggiest place I've ever experienced.

Don't even think about going to any of the themes parks during summer months. Standing in a long line during the summer waiting to get on a ride can be down right unbearable.
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Old 07-19-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
15,832 posts, read 5,416,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATUMRE75 View Post
Orlando is the absolute muggiest place I've ever experienced.

Don't even think about going to any of the themes parks during summer months. Standing in a long line during the summer waiting to get on a ride can be down right unbearable.
I went to Disney World in July when I was 6 years old, and I didn't mind from what I remember
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Old 07-19-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: San Angelo, TX
1,642 posts, read 2,809,001 times
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I agree about Orlando, visit in the summer at your peril. What's interesting is that going north after Ocala the humidity drops a bit, but it gets hotter (feels like the South).
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Old 07-19-2017, 01:52 PM
Status: "Soon I'll hear old winter's song.." (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
5,395 posts, read 2,858,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
A dense Southern city would still have far more robust vegetation growth than a dense Northern city. The power the South has over the North regarding vegetative growing climate cannot be denied.



Nope.





No one said that Northern cities aren't lush. Just that Southern cities are (by far) lusher.



Both latitude and longitude contribute, but longitude only to an extent.



The Northern winters are just too cold, so the trees have to go dormant, preventing growth while the same specimens down South are still attaining height. Therefore, tree growth is more robust down South than up North, when controlling for tree specimen.



The differences are:

1.)~ 60% of Tampa's rain comes in during the summer, from June-September, compared to only ~32% of Boston's. Much more frequent rainfall in Tampa than Boston during that time. Not to mention, at least 3 months of Boston's rainfall ends up not mattering.

2.) Tampa's minimal frost climate, compared to Boston, meaning that plants can grow year-round.

Put it all together, and you'll find that Tampa, like the rest of the coastal South, is a monsoonal warm humid climate, among the best when it comes to growing great vegetation and sustaining human civilization.

Northern trees are adapted to cold climates. Most of the south has cold enough winters for dormancy as well. It doesn't matter how cold it gets, once it gets to a certain temps many species will go dormant. You also forget that all the snow that melts in spring gives a lot of water and nutrients to the plant life. Miami is the warmest major city in the South, and aside from a few palms and pine trees, most of the trees are very short or midsized. Texas, aside from the eastern part, has short trees as well. Half of the state is full of mesquite trees, which aren't tall. There's lots of tall trees in the south but there's a lot in the north as well. Plants growing year round which really only happens in Florida, doesn't make them any taller.
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Old 07-19-2017, 01:56 PM
Status: "Soon I'll hear old winter's song.." (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
5,395 posts, read 2,858,647 times
Reputation: 7087
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvpsharky View Post
the trees that grow in the North are natives and are perfectly adapted to the climate .. in the summer they grow fast and furious ... and they wouldn't survive in warmer climates. they need the dormant period.

Right. Not all trees are the same. He also forgets that most of the south has a dormant period too, and southern trees tend to go dormant at warmer temperatures. I'm sure than an oak native to Texas that is planted in Iowa would lose its leaves before the native Iowa trees, because of its threshold for temperatures being higher.

Northern trees are better equipped to handle late spring frosts than southern trees as well. A frost in early May is less damaging up north than down south.
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Old 07-19-2017, 02:15 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,172 posts, read 2,856,491 times
Reputation: 4387
Chicago doesn't belong on this list. I've lived in many places and Chicago is the coolest in the summer. We do have some hot and muggy days, but it can't compare to some of the places mentioned previously in this thread.
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Old 07-19-2017, 11:14 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,047,286 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvpsharky View Post
the trees that grow in the North are natives and are perfectly adapted to the climate .. in the summer they grow fast and furious ... and they wouldn't survive in warmer climates. they need the dormant period.
I'm talking more about trees that are seen in both areas, such as the American hollie, tulip poplar, red maple, etc; the Southern specimen always grow taller than the Northern specimen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Here's one:
Not even close.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Most of the south has cold enough winters for dormancy as well. It doesn't matter how cold it gets, once it gets to a certain temps many species will go dormant. There's lots of tall trees in the south but there's a lot in the north as well. Plants growing year round which really only happens in Florida, doesn't make them any taller.
Even the areas of the South that do go to actual dormancy do so for a length lesser than seen up North.

But there really is no true dormant period for quite a bit of the region even with the freezes (especially the coastal and/or low latitude areas), because:

- The freezes are rarely are long in duration, with temps rebounding back up to the 50s/60s by the afternoon
- As a result, the ground temperatures don't get cold, and the freeze line is minimal

Thus, the roots of plants remain warm in the South, allowing for continual growth even through the freezes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Miami is the warmest major city in the South, and aside from a few palms and pine trees, most of the trees are very short or midsized.
Yet still more robust and lush than anything seen up North.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Texas, aside from the eastern part, has short trees as well. Half of the state is full of mesquite trees, which aren't tall.
And those western Texas areas still retain the better growing climate than corresponding longitudes in the North. There are mesquite trees, but those are hardly the only tree species present in much of those areas of Texas.
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