U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-16-2017, 07:30 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,100,509 times
Reputation: 9830

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
He didn't say Atlanta metropolitan area he said Atlanta lacks prewar urban and right next to Downtown is suburban... this is called a lie.
No, it's the 100% truth, and I provided photographic evidence. There are clearly very suburban streets right near downtown, some without even sidewalks. Atlanta, almost without question, is the most suburban city of its size on the planet. 7 million people and barely an intact urban street.

Ironically, the rest of your post is nothing but strawman arguments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-17-2017, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,402 posts, read 7,405,839 times
Reputation: 7303
So why is having your house or apartment right on the street a good thing? Never understood this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2017, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,215 posts, read 11,641,979 times
Reputation: 10334
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
So why is having your house or apartment right on the street a good thing? Never understood this.
Speaking about contemporary times, I think the big advantage is the lack of a front yard. First, it's a space on public display that you basically have to maintain in order to be neighborly. Second, front yards are generally speaking not actively used by people in the same way that back yards are. People don't have cookouts there, don't sunbathe in their lawn chairs, kids usually don't play in them, etc. In general pushing a building forward and allowing for a larger back yard allows for much more functional use of outdoor space. Grassy "yards" around apartment buildings are even more useless, because they're not even designed as public space, but empty landscaping.

Now, I do agree that in general one should avoid having entrances at grade, like you sometimes find in New Orleans, because it means that any passing person can just peer into your front window, requiring you to constantly keep the curtains closed. But there are easy ways around this in urban design, including raising the foundation of the house out of the ground (this is why the classic NYC brownstone has its basement half exposed) or having the house set say 5 feet back, with a front porch directly on the sidewalk.

In general it should be noted up until around a century ago if you looked at the price of apartments the most desirable units were on the first floor, and the most desirable places to rent were on the busiest streets. This came down to two elements - that elevators were not widespread, and not having to climb flights of stairs held a price premium, and that being close to a walkable business district with transit access was considered a plus. The equation flipped solely due to cars and the resulting road noise and pollution making being close to a ROW less desirable. Therefore in urban neighborhoods which are not car centric, it makes little sense in the modern era to continue the practice of front setbacks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2017, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,303 posts, read 5,239,269 times
Reputation: 3536
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
So why is having your house or apartment right on the street a good thing? Never understood this.
Not sure if I understand the question. Are you asking why it would be beneficial to have zero (or very little) setback distance from the street?

If so, the benefit is walkability. Quaint, accessible, efficient. It adds a lot to street life IMO. Medium to large setbacks (in a more urban sense) creates more distance in the front taking away from interactions and the convenience of a true urban lifestyle.

It also creates longer/larger blocks (all that space added up), encouraging a more suburban type of lifestyle. This is my neighborhood:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9318...7i13312!8i6656

If setbacks pushed the buildings back by 10 feet, the streets would be wider, longer and much less walkable IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2017, 09:40 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,100,509 times
Reputation: 9830
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
So why is having your house or apartment right on the street a good thing? Never understood this.
It isn't an inherently good or bad thing, but it's clearly an urban thing. If you want an urban city, you need tight blocks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2017, 10:05 AM
 
2,285 posts, read 2,760,928 times
Reputation: 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Not sure if I understand the question. Are you asking why it would be beneficial to have zero (or very little) setback distance from the street?

If so, the benefit is walkability. Quaint, accessible, efficient. It adds a lot to street life IMO. Medium to large setbacks (in a more urban sense) creates more distance in the front taking away from interactions and the convenience of a true urban lifestyle.

It also creates longer/larger blocks (all that space added up), encouraging a more suburban type of lifestyle. This is my neighborhood:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9318...7i13312!8i6656

If setbacks pushed the buildings back by 10 feet, the streets would be wider, longer and much less walkable IMO.
Love the density of South Philly row house city... You don't get much denser and more urban than that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-17-2017, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,303 posts, read 5,239,269 times
Reputation: 3536
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheProf View Post
Love the density of South Philly row house city... You don't get much denser and more urban than that.
Thanks, me too. The neighborhood is 65k ppsm and it's a fully functioning neighborhood (don't need to leave for any amenities).

This is one of the things legacy cities enjoy. Neighborhoods like this can't really be created today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2017, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Buffalo/Utica NY
132 posts, read 94,026 times
Reputation: 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synopsis101 View Post
Charlotte's urbanity is greater than 0.86 miles. South of Charlotte's center is rapidly densifying.

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.2106...7i13312!8i6656
Part of that rehabbed area south of Charlotte where the textile factories were looks better than the area south of Buffalo with rehabbed industrial buildings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2017, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,402 posts, read 7,405,839 times
Reputation: 7303
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Not sure if I understand the question. Are you asking why it would be beneficial to have zero (or very little) setback distance from the street?

If so, the benefit is walkability. Quaint, accessible, efficient. It adds a lot to street life IMO. Medium to large setbacks (in a more urban sense) creates more distance in the front taking away from interactions and the convenience of a true urban lifestyle.

It also creates longer/larger blocks (all that space added up), encouraging a more suburban type of lifestyle. This is my neighborhood:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9318...7i13312!8i6656

If setbacks pushed the buildings back by 10 feet, the streets would be wider, longer and much less walkable IMO.
It seems like everyone thinks it's such an awesome thing. But why?

I don't think it adds anything to street life, especially if we are talking about apartments (which is what I am) or houses. Apartments and houses with no greenery to me is miserable and depressing. Having residences set off 20 feet does not make anything less walkable. Also weird having people walk right by your head while your sleeping/noise.

Maybe it's a personal preference thing, but I really just don't get it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2019, 06:18 PM
 
9,177 posts, read 9,318,115 times
Reputation: 5657
Denver is now on track to surpass St Louis in Density by 2020. Right now the difference is only ~200ppm. Denver has a more extensive Transit network too.

So looking back at this I don’t really see a huge distinction between rust belt and a lot of new age cities, even more so now.

Also with metros like Cleveland , Detroit, and Baltimore only having their core counties (or in Bmores case the city) lose population in the region speaks to the convergence of the Rustbelt built form to the southern and Western cities save SF, LA and Seattle.

Last edited by btownboss4; 04-22-2019 at 06:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top