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Old 07-23-2017, 08:54 PM
 
2,195 posts, read 2,185,905 times
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Because it's sort of awesome, and people are just kind of finding out it's out there.
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:59 PM
 
2,195 posts, read 2,185,905 times
Reputation: 1916
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanenthusiastfromKC View Post
you really can't compare Tulsa, Omaha, or Witchita to KC.
Well, you can compare anything. I think KC is the best place of the the 3(or 4), mentioned, and not just because it's bigger, though that helps, but I also don't think Tulsa or Omaha are so different in terms of size that they don't merit consideration as peers, or cities with a lot of similarities. I also think Des Moines is kind of in the mix of Great Plains or Grain Belt cities of certain ilk, and Minneapolis on the other end of the size spectrum. And while I don't think KC has much to recommend it over Minneapolis, I do think they are peers and comparable in a lot of ways.
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Old 07-24-2017, 12:57 AM
 
43 posts, read 27,327 times
Reputation: 46
Kansas City loves Omaha - and Omaha loves Kansas City.
It's true - we're like family
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Old 07-24-2017, 01:01 AM
 
43 posts, read 27,327 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricNorthman View Post
Why are there so many Kansas City threads?
True, but I don't think it's because people from KC are starting them.
It seems to be people from other places.
Maybe it's because everyone wants to move here

Last edited by eugeniomerill; 07-24-2017 at 01:25 AM..
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:51 AM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,333 posts, read 7,447,073 times
Reputation: 2965
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Omaha and Tulsa are both considerably smaller than KC therefore KC has a lot more to offer as far as amenities, cultural attractions, pro sports, amusement parks, theater, better connected airport etc. There is a lot more to do in KC. People from Tulsa and Omaha will often vacation in KC.

Other than that, they are very similar. The three have a lot in common. Very similar topography with rolling terrain and very green and wooded tree cover, they are all river cities, they are all midwestern (Tulsa is nothing like OKC and would have more in common with KC than OKC).

Tulsa is much more conservative than KC, but I still feel it's more midwestern than southern. Omaha really is a small KC in almost every way.

Weather would be similar in all three. Omaha would have slightly cooler summers and a bit more snow than KC. Tulsa the opposite. None are really in the violent heart of tornado alley like OKC or other parts of MO, KS and OK, but all will get some pretty impressive spring thunderstorms.

I would rank KC considerably higher than the other two mostly do to size and rank Omaha slightly above Tulsa because I think they have a more vibrant downtown.

Wichita is not a great town at all. Just not a lot going on there. Pretty run down, downtown is nearly empty most of the time, topography is more like what you would expect from KS or OK than the other cities. Pretty flat and bland. It's also in the state of Kansas which pretty much only cares about suburban Johnson County next to KCMO.

So:

Kansas City, MO







Omaha, NE

Tulsa, OK







Wichita, KS
I think your ranking of the cities listed is fine, but I would say you're off-base in assessing culture, in particular the culture of Tulsa, and especially the comment that it is nothing like OK City.

Tulsa is definitely more Southern than anything else. It's located in the South-Central. It's very akin culturally to Arkansas, in fact, Northwest Arkansas and the lower Ozark range, in particular. When comparing Tulsa to the other cities on the list it is a Southern city compared to KC and Omaha which are solidly westernized Midwest cities. Tulsa is most like a mixture of Little Rock and OK City...which makes sense, OK City is only a hundred miles from Tulsa. The people who say that Tulsa is nothing like OK City generally are Tulsa snoots who despise the Cowboy/Ranching Southwestern culture OK City.

Tulsa is a westernized Southern city. When one considers the speech pattern, which is a derivative of Southern dialect---for most an Okie twang---as well as the staunch Evangelical culture led by the high preponderance of Southern Baptists, one has to acknowledge Tulsa's Southernness. Also, given the surrounding culture of Tulsa, smaller towns of eastern Oklahoma like Muskogee stretching to the Arkansas line it's quite obvious that Tulsa is not part of the Midwest or "Midwestern." (Unless you're trying to say that there's another "Midwest" other than the traditionally understood region made up of Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Nebraska, Iowa, Michigan, the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Illinois. You would have to group Texas and Arkansas in with your alternate Midwest because these are the states most like the culture of Oklahoma, and Tulsa.)

I understand many Yankee oil barons tried to make Tulsa the "Midwest of the Southwest" back at the turn of the twentieth century, but that aristocracy is only representative of a small modicum of Tulsa's population/culture.

At the end of the day, Tulsa is Southern. No one is arguing that it is Jackson or Birmingham, but it is a derivative of the South at large and more Southern than anything else.
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Old 07-24-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, Missouri
78 posts, read 50,266 times
Reputation: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SPonteKC View Post
Well, you can compare anything. I think KC is the best place of the the 3(or 4), mentioned, and not just because it's bigger, though that helps, but I also don't think Tulsa or Omaha are so different in terms of size that they don't merit consideration as peers, or cities with a lot of similarities. I also think Des Moines is kind of in the mix of Great Plains or Grain Belt cities of certain ilk, and Minneapolis on the other end of the size spectrum. And while I don't think KC has much to recommend it over Minneapolis, I do think they are peers and comparable in a lot of ways.
I just meant by tier, Omaha and Tulsa are tier 4 cities while KC is more tier 3 and some may say tier 2. It is very hard to compare and not fun to compare a tier 2 city to a tier 4. Wichita feels tier 5 plus IMO. Des Moines should be on this list instead of Wichita for Des Moines size its got a lot going for it. Minneapolis is definitley tier 2 and would be hard to compare to KC, but easier then to compare KC to Tulsa etc.. because tier 3 and above are more "big cities" when tier 4 is "small to medium sized"
Minneapolis - 3.5 Mil

Kansas City - 2.1 Mil

Omaha - 900k

Last edited by urbanenthusiastfromKC; 07-24-2017 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 07-25-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
296 posts, read 519,031 times
Reputation: 343
Well, Kansas City is much larger , so it should have the advantage as to more things to do , etc.. But, when I've visited there, its just seems slow, and not much at all going on, the feel of a little appalachian town almost.
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Old 07-25-2017, 02:37 PM
 
43 posts, read 27,327 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by graterdaze View Post
Well, Kansas City is much larger , so it should have the advantage as to more things to do , etc.. But, when I've visited there, its just seems slow, and not much at all going on, the feel of a little appalachian town almost.
You at least enjoyed the snake-handling and strychnine drinking at our church services, didn't you?
"Appalachian town USA."

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...328315/enhance

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/services/mediarender/THISLIFE/010060881148/media/53134378535/large/1500874024190/enhance

More "little Appalachian town," there's nothing to do here.
https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...819435/enhance

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...011645/enhance

Last edited by eugeniomerill; 07-25-2017 at 02:47 PM.. Reason: More Appalachian town.
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Old 07-25-2017, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
720 posts, read 656,509 times
Reputation: 739
Kansas City
-
-
Oklahoma City
-
Omaha
Tulsa
-
-
-
Wichita
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Old 12-15-2018, 06:07 PM
 
44 posts, read 3,739 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
I think your ranking of the cities listed is fine, but I would say you're off-base in assessing culture, in particular the culture of Tulsa, and especially the comment that it is nothing like OK City.

Tulsa is definitely more Southern than anything else. It's located in the South-Central. It's very akin culturally to Arkansas, in fact, Northwest Arkansas and the lower Ozark range, in particular. When comparing Tulsa to the other cities on the list it is a Southern city compared to KC and Omaha which are solidly westernized Midwest cities. Tulsa is most like a mixture of Little Rock and OK City...which makes sense, OK City is only a hundred miles from Tulsa. The people who say that Tulsa is nothing like OK City generally are Tulsa snoots who despise the Cowboy/Ranching Southwestern culture OK City.

Tulsa is a westernized Southern city. When one considers the speech pattern, which is a derivative of Southern dialect---for most an Okie twang---as well as the staunch Evangelical culture led by the high preponderance of Southern Baptists, one has to acknowledge Tulsa's Southernness. Also, given the surrounding culture of Tulsa, smaller towns of eastern Oklahoma like Muskogee stretching to the Arkansas line it's quite obvious that Tulsa is not part of the Midwest or "Midwestern." (Unless you're trying to say that there's another "Midwest" other than the traditionally understood region made up of Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Nebraska, Iowa, Michigan, the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Illinois. You would have to group Texas and Arkansas in with your alternate Midwest because these are the states most like the culture of Oklahoma, and Tulsa.)

I understand many Yankee oil barons tried to make Tulsa the "Midwest of the Southwest" back at the turn of the twentieth century, but that aristocracy is only representative of a small modicum of Tulsa's population/culture.

At the end of the day, Tulsa is Southern. No one is arguing that it is Jackson or Birmingham, but it is a derivative of the South at large and more Southern than anything else.
Tulsa is in no way Southern. I've been all around and it is more Midwestern than anything. And out of all of those cities, I'd say:

KC
Tulsa
Omaha
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