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Old 05-21-2018, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
910 posts, read 517,551 times
Reputation: 1346

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
"Exceptions" don't get acknowledged as much as we should. It's frustrating.
Because you are so outnumbered by the Negadelphians, who are more typical and far more vocal. It blows my mind how they can be so willfully blind to how great this city really is.
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Old 05-21-2018, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,008 posts, read 494,653 times
Reputation: 554
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Detroit, Oklahoma City, Birmingham have pretty bad perception problems. Jacksonville and Phoenix also suffer from this but not quite to the same extent as Detroit, OKC, and Birmingham.

Philly, Chicago, and Los Angeles get a lot of hate but they also get a lot of love as well. The worst cities for perception problems are those that get mostly detractors with few if any defenders.
That's Cleveland to the core. And, most of the detractors get their ideas of Cleveland from the media or hearsay. Most of them never even visited the city they still have a 1960s, 1970s or 1980s view of Cleveland.
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Old 05-21-2018, 03:08 PM
 
8,210 posts, read 4,409,375 times
Reputation: 2703
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Because you are so outnumbered by the Negadelphians, who are more typical and far more vocal. It blows my mind how they can be so willfully blind to how great this city really is.
Snarky retort.. Your goal, as stated by you, is to leave the city and area. So how great is to you actually?

You don't love it enough to stay. And once you're gone the chances of you coming back, except to visit(maybe) are probably zero.

Will you take your like of the city with you? Will you defend it?
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Old 05-22-2018, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
910 posts, read 517,551 times
Reputation: 1346
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Snarky retort.. Your goal, as stated by you, is to leave the city and area. So how great is to you actually?

You don't love it enough to stay. And once you're gone the chances of you coming back, except to visit(maybe) are probably zero.

Will you take your like of the city with you? Will you defend it?
I'm leaving because there are opportunities to move up my career ladder elsewhere that I can't find in Philly. I moved here almost 8 years ago out of choice. In that time I have come to love this city and I do consider it my home. I have friends and a life here that I won't simply abandon when I decamp. And you bet I'll defend the greatness of this city to my dying breath, because it holds a special place for me. I even convinced one of my friends from childhood to move down here, and she will most likely end up staying long after I'm gone. I'm also a graduate of two schools here (one smaller in the suburbs, and one major one in the city). So yes, just because I'm leaving does not mean I'm going to forget.

Last edited by MB1562; 05-22-2018 at 06:07 AM..
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Old 05-22-2018, 06:32 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,873 posts, read 4,514,102 times
Reputation: 2201
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
People mention NYC being dirty all the time. Have you never heard of the rat meme?
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
I'm leaving because there are opportunities to move up my career ladder elsewhere that I can't find in Philly. I moved here almost 8 years ago out of choice. In that time I have come to love this city and I do consider it my home. I have friends and a life here that I won't simply abandon when I decamp. And you bet I'll defend the greatness of this city to my dying breath, because it holds a special place for me. I even convinced one of my friends from childhood to move down here, and she will most likely end up staying long after I'm gone. I'm also a graduate of two schools here (one smaller in the suburbs, and one major one in the city). So yes, just because I'm leaving does not mean I'm going to forget.
I left and still talk highly about Philadelphia to all of my snobby NYC friends. I even got two of them to visit (never been) and loved it. They keep asking when we are going back.
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Old 05-23-2018, 02:17 PM
 
193 posts, read 76,696 times
Reputation: 186
Dirtiest city in the U.S. I've been to is San Francisco by far. Nowhere else I've been to is close, including New York and Philly. Philly, at least downtown and surrounding areas, is a good deal cleaner than it was 15-20 years ago. The second biggest impediment to Philly's success was a lack of vision at the city level compared to administrations in places like New York and Boston. This is starting to change for the better, and Philadelphia was always a very Democratic, but very non-progressive city, with a very strangely, conservative-ish streak. Now it is getting more progressive and people are envisioning larger things, such as what have been done infrastructure-wise in other larger cities in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

There are several reasons for this including the transformation of several neighborhoods (Bella Vista, Italian Market area, Northern Liberties, and Fishtown), as well as improvements that were made, but that had already started before, in University City. The modernization of Chinatown is also worthy of note, if not as critical for changing the city, as these other things. The continued improvement of UPenn (in absolute terms more than relative) as well as the relative improvement in the quality of Drexel has also helped bring in more people from other parts of the U.S., as well as from outside the U.S., to those universities. So we are seeing a shift more like that of a larger Boston IMO (still some very big differences in demographics and structure though).

I still think there is more that can be done, especially around Broad Street north of City Hall. Philly still has massive inequality issues and education issues for those born and raised in the city, that seem pretty intractable.
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Old 05-23-2018, 02:19 PM
 
193 posts, read 76,696 times
Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
That's Cleveland to the core. And, most of the detractors get their ideas of Cleveland from the media or hearsay. Most of them never even visited the city they still have a 1960s, 1970s or 1980s view of Cleveland.
Cleveland has improved a decent bit, but still has a long way to go IMO. It does remind me a bit of a smaller Philly at this point, like where Philly was in the late 1990s, starting its upward swing. Was just there about a year ago, and I was pleasantly surprised.
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Old 05-23-2018, 09:02 PM
 
1,202 posts, read 908,085 times
Reputation: 685
Quote:
Originally Posted by TasteofSourCherry View Post
I don't even view Philadelphia as all that bad. Yes, I view it as having high crime areas but also view it as a historic city, with good universities (both inside and nearby), affordable cost of living, walkable, and in a beautiful area.

When it comes to cities, my perceptions are almost entirely negative of places like Flint, Camden, Baltimore, Detroit, St Louis, etc. But Philadelphia, more like it has its problems but still a good place.
As a Baltimoron, I can tell you that locals see Philadelphia as a place with relatively few problems. In fact, when I point out the many of the two cities' demographics look surprisingly similar, people simply don't believe it. But with Baltimore's per capita murder rate several times higher that Philadelphia's, no other stat really counts.

Still, I don't understand the constant comparison of Baltimore with Camden by Philadelphians. Incomes in Baltimore are almost double Camden's (and 10% higher than Philadelphia's.) Based on relative prosperity alone, Baltimore has to be a very different kind of place than Camden.
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Old 05-23-2018, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
159 posts, read 55,390 times
Reputation: 345
Well, Camden is a ghetto next to a big core city..Baltimore is a big core city that has a lot of ghettos. It's a different thing. I kinda view Camden as being like Gary, IN or East St. Louis, IL - primarily because they're all dumps that are independent jurisdictions across a state line from their core cities. So you got all the negatives of urban living without any of the positives.
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Old 05-23-2018, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,283 posts, read 3,347,532 times
Reputation: 3001
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
As a Baltimoron, I can tell you that locals see Philadelphia as a place with relatively few problems. In fact, when I point out the many of the two cities' demographics look surprisingly similar, people simply don't believe it. But with Baltimore's per capita murder rate several times higher that Philadelphia's, no other stat really counts.

Still, I don't understand the constant comparison of Baltimore with Camden by Philadelphians. Incomes in Baltimore are almost double Camden's (and 10% higher than Philadelphia's.) Based on relative prosperity alone, Baltimore has to be a very different kind of place than Camden.
*Begins to speak*.....keeps quiet.
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