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Old 06-01-2018, 02:13 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,245 posts, read 5,539,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Physically, they are very, very similar---legions of distressed row house neighborhoods as far as the eye can see...
There are far less distressed houses than there are not.
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Old 06-01-2018, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,559 posts, read 2,521,096 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
There are far less distressed houses than there are not.

From reading the comments on this site, I have come to learn that New Englander's would have you believe they all live in castles on the rocks overlooking a rocky shore like a Norman Rockwell painting. While crappy Philadelphians are banging rocks together under an overpass.
They get very upset when you point out that Boston's poverty rate is still over 20% and mere percentage points away from Baltimore and Philadelphia.

Boston is perceived as a much safer city and the crime rates do back that up, but it isn't like bad things never happen in Boston either like multiple being stabbed downtown last night. In my opinion, DC has the best 'perception' compared to reality. Some people don't realize how high DC's crime rates are, and others will try to tell you that only bad things happen in the Southeast which isn't true.

I have met people with a wide variety of opinions about Philadelphia. The city's politics are often polarizing and your opinion on certain issues goes a long way in terms of defining your perception of the place if you haven't ever been here or if you have been here very little.

I often find that older blue collar people (like a lot of Pennsylvanians) hold an extremely negative view of the city. I spent most of my childhood in a pretty rural area of PA so I have a good sense of what people think imo. I believe the disdain comes from the fact that the cities they grew up with have disappeared. It was due to the industrial nature of the cities. Philadelphia, Trenton, Camden, Wilmington, Allentown, Easton, Bethlehem, Reading were all prospering thriving cities that helped define America before deindustrialization (to make sure I spelled this correctly I typed it into google and literally the top photo on Wikipedia is a picture of Bethlehem Steel). Afterwards, the inner cities were largely neglected and left to rot. As the working class neighborhoods shrank (and continue to) the people living there would take their resentment with them.

So in short, I think Philadelphia does have a bad perception with some people for deserved reasons, but those same people often overlook and don't give Philadelphia the credit for actually offering a ton of really cool things that can compete with any other city. It also is gentrifying a ton with crime rates at 40-50 year lows. I truly believe that the younger generations will grow up with a better perception of the city. So on that note, I need to go out and enjoy myself


Philadelphia at one time was called The Miracle on the Delaware. Who knows maybe it will be again one day.
This video is a great view of what the cities were like post-WW2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNYd_t7KtsY
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Old 06-01-2018, 05:46 PM
 
Location: New York City
4,866 posts, read 4,509,875 times
Reputation: 2197
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
From reading the comments on this site, I have come to learn that New Englander's would have you believe they all live in castles on the rocks overlooking a rocky shore like a Norman Rockwell painting. While crappy Philadelphians are banging rocks together under an overpass.
They get very upset when you point out that Boston's poverty rate is still over 20% and mere percentage points away from Baltimore and Philadelphia.

Boston is perceived as a much safer city and the crime rates do back that up, but it isn't like bad things never happen in Boston either like multiple being stabbed downtown last night. In my opinion, DC has the best 'perception' compared to reality. Some people don't realize how high DC's crime rates are, and others will try to tell you that only bad things happen in the Southeast which isn't true.

I have met people with a wide variety of opinions about Philadelphia. The city's politics are often polarizing and your opinion on certain issues goes a long way in terms of defining your perception of the place if you haven't ever been here or if you have been here very little.

I often find that older blue collar people (like a lot of Pennsylvanians) hold an extremely negative view of the city. I spent most of my childhood in a pretty rural area of PA so I have a good sense of what people think imo. I believe the disdain comes from the fact that the cities they grew up with have disappeared. It was due to the industrial nature of the cities. Philadelphia, Trenton, Camden, Wilmington, Allentown, Easton, Bethlehem, Reading were all prospering thriving cities that helped define America before deindustrialization (to make sure I spelled this correctly I typed it into google and literally the top photo on Wikipedia is a picture of Bethlehem Steel). Afterwards, the inner cities were largely neglected and left to rot. As the working class neighborhoods shrank (and continue to) the people living there would take their resentment with them.

So in short, I think Philadelphia does have a bad perception with some people for deserved reasons, but those same people often overlook and don't give Philadelphia the credit for actually offering a ton of really cool things that can compete with any other city. It also is gentrifying a ton with crime rates at 40-50 year lows. I truly believe that the younger generations will grow up with a better perception of the city. So on that note, I need to go out and enjoy myself

Majorly agree on the first point. DC was pretty much a wasteland until the later 90s, worse than Philadelphia was at its lowest, and now its a boomtown, the center of the US gov't, and a ton of transplants who came from the Midwest and Southeast, who think DC is the best city there is.

I love educating people on that topic and also about Philadelphia, but opinions generally do not change until people actually visit the city, which is unfortunate.

I think the view of Philadelphia, and its reputation is changing for the better, just very slowly.

I was at the Museum of New York City today for an exhibit, and NYC was pretty much a wasteland in the 1970s and people seem to forget that, yet harp on Philadelphia for having some rundown neighborhoods.
(I know NYC is on another level, but still).

DC still has a major crime problem, I believer per capita it is higher than Philadelphia. Poverty is also quite high, but again, glossed over because its DC.

I love to stump people from DC when they take a shot at Philadelphia, because they can never back up their claim.

Boston is another culprit for that. But I still love Boston, way more than DC.
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Old 06-01-2018, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,265 posts, read 7,192,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
From reading the comments on this site, I have come to learn that New Englander's would have you believe they all live in castles on the rocks overlooking a rocky shore like a Norman Rockwell painting. While crappy Philadelphians are banging rocks together under an overpass.
They get very upset when you point out that Boston's poverty rate is still over 20% and mere percentage points away from Baltimore and Philadelphia
Indeed. I thought your post overall was pretty spot on, but being that I have some very direct experience now as a transplanted SEPA'n in the Boston area, I'd actually caveat what you say as definitely accurate amongst a certain subset of New Englanders, but definitely not the majority.

Boston, and New England generally, is of course far from a utopia, despite what some of those uppity Brahmins say or think.

It's interesting, though. Despite Philly having the "provincial" reputation in the Northeast Corridor (although B'more maybe moreso), I've generally found Philadelphians more open minded about the merits of other places to live, whereas, again, there's definitely more palpable presence of Bostonians who could never envision a life anywhere else, and particularly outside the Northeast. To me, that's the very definition of provincialism.
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Old 06-01-2018, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,661 posts, read 1,772,194 times
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FWIW, while Washington's crime rate is higher, its poverty rate is seven percentage points lower.

That's probably because of all the affluent white folks who moved into the city since the 1990s.

One big thing that happened to Washington between the riots of 1968 and now is: It got a subway.

I wouldn't dismiss that development as having a profound effect on the city's trajectory.

Boston's poverty rate is 4.7 percentage points lower. But it seems that most people who talk about poverty consider that a large enough gap to be significant. ISTR that Chicago's poverty rate was about where Boston's was in 2016 (21%) a few years back (it's dropped since, by about two percentage points), and people were cluck-clucking about that difference.

Let's not get too carried away about the transformations that have occurred here, great though they have been. One of the big ones that happened in every one of those other cities, but not here, is:

They regained all the jobs they had lost since 1970, and most of them have surpassed those levels now.

Philadelphia remains about 20 percent below its 1970 jobs figure, even with the recent gains.

That, I'd like to submit, affects that poverty rate as well as our commuting patterns. We need to fix that problem if we want to have a shot at bringing down that poverty rate.
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Old 06-01-2018, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,661 posts, read 1,772,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post

It's interesting, though. Despite Philly having the "provincial" reputation in the Northeast Corridor (although B'more maybe moreso), I've generally found Philadelphians more open minded about the merits of other places to live, whereas, again, there's definitely more palpable presence of Bostonians who could never envision a life anywhere else, and particularly outside the Northeast. To me, that's the very definition of provincialism.
I recall both a phrase and a joke that speak to that.

I'll spare you all the joke, which is rather long and involved, except to note that it involves a trip to relatives in Iowa and the punchline is "Via Dedham." (Trains leaving South Station for New York pass through this southern suburb of Boston.)

The phrase, however, is pithy and captures that sentiment perfectly. I saw it on the old "word wall" that was mounted outside the multimedia show "Where's Boston?," a popular tourist draw from the mid-1970s until the 1990s:

"Why should I travel when I'm already here?"
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Old 06-01-2018, 07:12 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,245 posts, read 5,539,737 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Indeed. I thought your post overall was pretty spot on, but being that I have some very direct experience now as a transplanted SEPA'n in the Boston area, I'd actually caveat what you say as definitely accurate amongst a certain subset of New Englanders, but definitely not the majority.

Boston, and New England generally, is of course far from a utopia, despite what some of those uppity Brahmins say or think.

It's interesting, though. Despite Philly having the "provincial" reputation in the Northeast Corridor (although B'more maybe moreso), I've generally found Philadelphians more open minded about the merits of other places to live, whereas, again, there's definitely more palpable presence of Bostonians who could never envision a life anywhere else, and particularly outside the Northeast. To me, that's the very definition of provincialism.
I think NYC is the most provincial city in the NE corridor
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Old 06-02-2018, 02:07 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,556,673 times
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Philly is already getting more expensive, trust me that you don't want it to have a better perception.
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Old 06-02-2018, 09:11 AM
 
27,752 posts, read 24,774,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Majorly agree on the first point. DC was pretty much a wasteland until the later 90s, worse than Philadelphia was at its lowest, and now its a boomtown, the center of the US gov't, and a ton of transplants who came from the Midwest and Southeast, who think DC is the best city there is.
I'm pretty sure that's not a recent development.
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Old 06-02-2018, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
4,514 posts, read 8,601,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Boston is perceived as a much safer city and the crime rates do back that up, but it isn't like bad things never happen in Boston either like multiple being stabbed downtown last night. In my opinion, DC has the best 'perception' compared to reality. Some people don't realize how high DC's crime rates are, and others will try to tell you that only bad things happen in the Southeast which isn't true.
The Boston Marathon bombing makes me want to stay clear from New England. Interestingly Metro Boston has not been growing, but New England has stagnated regionally.

New York is overrated. It is the world's biggest terrorist target and, like Galveston, is too close to the coast accounting for storm surge. Sandy exposed some of the weaknesses of being on the water instead of slightly inland. I could foresee Philadelphia becoming more popular with ex-New Yorkers and others who need to locate on the East Coast. The Colonial-era architecture in Center City adds to the charm. Being midway between NYC and DC is also an advantage.

Quote:
So in short, I think Philadelphia does have a bad perception with some people for deserved reasons, but those same people often overlook and don't give Philadelphia the credit for actually offering a ton of really cool things that can compete with any other city. It also is gentrifying a ton with crime rates at 40-50 year lows. I truly believe that the younger generations will grow up with a better perception of the city. So on that note, I need to go out and enjoy myself
Comcast's X1 seems to be a big hit, enough to build a taller skyscraper than their current headquarters for their innovation lab. The system is impressive that both major cable providers in Canada have adopted the technology.
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