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Old 01-05-2018, 05:27 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,036,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Things like gay pride parades seem very counterculturey to me
Sure except almost every metro area from coast to coast has one, even the small ones.
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Old 01-05-2018, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,924,050 times
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Yes, LGBTQ is very common in pretty much every large city now. A few decades or more ago then sure, but today? It's just part of everyday life no matter if you are in NYC, Chicago, LA, Houston, DC, etc etc. There are still counter culture things with it today though - for example, International Mister Leather in Chicago, which has been there since 1979 as well as the Leather Archives and Museum in Chicago

But since we are on it, here is what I could find for when various cities' pride parades started:

* NYC: 1969
* Chicago: 1970
* Los Angeles: 1970
* San Francisco: 1970
* Atlanta :1971
* Dallas: 1972
* Minneapolis: 1972
* Philadelphia: 1972
* Wichita: 1972
* San Diego: 1974
* Seattle: 1974
* Washington DC: 1975
* Providence: 1976
* Salt Lake City: 1977
* Houston: 1979
* St. Louis: 1979
* Columbus: 1981
* Phoenix: 1981
* Las Vegas: 1983
* Indianapolis: 1988
* Nashville: 1988
* Oklahoma City: 1988
* Charlotte: 2001
* Miami Beach: 2009
* New Orleans: 2011

Of course, in many cities now these parades are trendy so it's a bit different. I think it says a lot about the cities who have been doing this since the 1970s or early 1980s - but especially the early 1970s (and 1969 for NYC).
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Old 01-06-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,265 posts, read 7,189,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Of course, in many cities now these parades are trendy so it's a bit different. I think it says a lot about the cities who have been doing this since the 1970s or early 1980s - but especially the early 1970s (and 1969 for NYC).
Very interesting history. It's also a little known fact that the first documented gay rights demonstration took place in 1965 in Philadelphia:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...=.b1be065a77fe
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Old 01-07-2018, 06:38 PM
 
Location: CA
17 posts, read 8,544 times
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I've known Cleveland was a bit "counterculture" (broad use of the term) since "The Drew Carey Show" and "Whose Line is It Anyway?" days. It's such an awkward TV show name, by the way. Drew Carey had the hipster glasses since before they became very mainstream. Kurt Cobain was wearing those same hipster glasses in 1992 - the earliest I've seen it worn after the 60s or so. The Drew Carey Show's self-effacing jingle with "Cleveland rocks" already told me that Cleveland rocked and had its fringes of counterculture even back then.

The hippest person I knew in the late 90s, who had the Drew Carey glasses and was in a band, was straight from Cinncinati.

Today, when I think 2005-era hipster, I think Philly. SF has moved a long way from the classic late-2000s hipster. It keeps reinventing itself - the core hipster look keeps changing. It's a very annoying look these days. I can barely describe it - it's so different from other places, but the closest equivalent these days are the hipsters in LA. SF has been becoming so soulless brogrammer that its hipsters seem more similar to LA's than to Berkeley's.

Places that you think of as bland and conservative are, in some ways, the most open-minded, most radical places of all. Same with people.
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Old 01-07-2018, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
20,862 posts, read 22,440,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LetMeIn99 View Post
I've known Cleveland was a bit "counterculture" (broad use of the term) since "The Drew Carey Show" and "Whose Line is It Anyway?" days. It's such an awkward TV show name, by the way. Drew Carey had the hipster glasses since before they became very mainstream. Kurt Cobain was wearing those same hipster glasses in 1992 - the earliest I've seen it worn after the 60s or so. The Drew Carey Show's self-effacing jingle with "Cleveland rocks" already told me that Cleveland rocked and had its fringes of counterculture even back then.

The hippest person I knew in the late 90s, who had the Drew Carey glasses and was in a band, was straight from Cinncinati.

Today, when I think 2005-era hipster, I think Philly. SF has moved a long way from the classic late-2000s hipster. It keeps reinventing itself - the core hipster look keeps changing. It's a very annoying look these days. I can barely describe it - it's so different from other places, but the closest equivalent these days are the hipsters in LA. SF has been becoming so soulless brogrammer that its hipsters seem more similar to LA's than to Berkeley's.

Places that you think of as bland and conservative are, in some ways, the most open-minded, most radical places of all. Same with people.
Donít forget Harvey Pekar from Cleveland. You canít much more counterculture than that guy.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_Pekar
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Old 01-07-2018, 07:11 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
2,823 posts, read 1,896,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LetMeIn99 View Post
Counterculture usually refers to hippies in the 60s-70s who liked fighting "the man," "dropping acid," going to art school, growing beards, having long hair (both men and women), living in communes, and being the complete opposite of what their parents were. Woodstock, the Summer of Love, the Beatles, and Berkeley are what I think of when I hear "counterculture." But the OP is using "counterculture" in a broader sense to include any subcultures that pride themselves in not being mainstream.

There are lots of subcultures that love being "alternative" - but they're usually just trying to fit into the dominant or cool culture, where ever they are. There's a lot of intersection between different subcultures.

I'm going to try to divide cities up into various types of subcultures.

Hippie/artist colonies/towns that have "retreats":
-Taos, NM
-Santa Fe, NM
-Sedona, AZ
-Ojai, CA
-San Anselmo, CA
-Santa Cruz, CA and surrounding areas (e.g. Esalen)

These towns have lots of old white people (60s-70s+) who still think they're in the 1970s. Talk about macrobiotic diets from Japanese Zen places, and they'll still know what you're talking about.

Where ever they have those dumb festivals:
-Woodstock
-That Burning Man place (Black Rock Desert, NV)
-Indio, CA (Coachella)
-Where ever they have fests that end in "kti" - Shakti, Bhakti - faux Eastern & Indian

Cities stuck in the classic hippie counterculture:
-Berkeley
-Santa Barbara - surprisingly, some Berkeley-type old-fashioned hippies there

College towns - love being liberal, snooty, artsy, academic, and old-fashioned at the same time:
-Davis, CA
-Flagstaff, AZ
-New Paltz, NY
-Arcata, CA
-U of Hawaii, Manoa
-Oberlin, OH
-Wellesley, MA
-Duluth, GA
-Athens, GA

Annoying big cities that are very corporate and full of tech bros, but that still consider themselves "counterculture":
-San Francisco
-Austin
-Seattle
-Oakland

Similar to above, but less techie, still extremely hipster and shallow:
-Brooklyn
-Portland
-NYC
-LA


Southern city that loves the "weird" label:

-Louisville, KY

The latest hipster region to move to:
-Western Montana, surprisingly - the cities of Missoula, Bozeman, Helena, Butte, and Kalispell. The typewriter poet, Tyler Knott Gregsson, lives in Helena with his photographer wife. Too cliched.

Big cities with lots of hipster pockets:
-Philly
-Boston
-Chicago
-all big cities/metro areas in US

It's probably true that all those other cities that we don't usually think of as "counterculture" are the most counterculture of all - Detroit, Cleveland, etc. A biography on Obama's mom claimed that Kansas, where she grew up, had the roots of radicalism, progressivism, and all that idealism that counterculture types value so much.

The Trappist monk in Kentucky, Thomas Merton, was extremely counterculture and cool. So you can find them anywhere, any region, any religious tradition or lack of it.
Damn. This post will never be topped no matter how long this thread remains active.
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Old 01-08-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
3,927 posts, read 2,337,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
Damn. This post will never be topped no matter how long this thread remains active.
Yep, was a funny post and as stated above, Asheville and Ann Arbor escaped his wrath.
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Old 01-08-2018, 12:23 PM
 
1,865 posts, read 997,841 times
Reputation: 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by LetMeIn99 View Post

Annoying big cities that are very corporate and full of tech bros, but that still consider themselves "counterculture":
-San Francisco
-Austin
-Seattle
-Oakland
Drops mic
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Old 01-08-2018, 01:20 PM
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,438 posts, read 2,244,870 times
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SF? And Counter culture? Yup nothing says counter culture like 3000$ a month rent and a corporate job. Watch out Portland! SF hasn't had counter culture since Ronald Reagan was president.

Oakland at least has some merit, though it's lost so much of the soul that by 2020 that probably wont be true.
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Old 01-09-2018, 12:01 PM
 
138 posts, read 76,104 times
Reputation: 139
I get what you're saying, but it IS still a form of rebellion against certain belief systems/lifestyles. It goes back to my analogy about rock, grunge, metal, and punk music and all of their sub-cultures. Those genres of music are generally more socially acceptable in most circles than they were generations ago, but there are still groups that oppose and look down on them, so you do still have a culture that's rebelling against something.
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