U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Most satisfying new city if moving from a Tier 1 metro.
San Diego 50 26.32%
Jacksonville 6 3.16%
Tampa 7 3.68%
Nashville 19 10.00%
Kansas City 14 7.37%
Charlotte 11 5.79%
Austin 11 5.79%
Atlanta 51 26.84%
Indianapolis 7 3.68%
St. Louis 14 7.37%
Voters: 190. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-28-2017, 06:12 AM
 
Location: East side - Metro ATL
1,325 posts, read 2,197,828 times
Reputation: 1197

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by eugeniomerill View Post
I see Atlanta is 2nd.
I don't understand why anyone would vote for Atlanta over San Diego.

Atlanta has all negatives of San Diego; high cost-of-living, insane traffic and high crime.

While Atlanta has none of the pluses that San Diego offers; low crime, perfect weather, beaches, mountains, sheer beauty.

That's not to say ATL is a bad or ugly place - but it doesn't even come close to San Diego by comparison. So why would anyone choose Atlanta over San Diego?
Diversity, Atlanta is a bigger city, Atlanta may not be near a beach but there is still a lot to do and there is always some type of event or festival going on, Nightlife, the world's busiest airport with nonstop flights to just about everywhere, lower cost-of-living than San Diego, more housing/apartments/condo/town home for the price, better higher education facilities, the food scene, the gay scene ans on and on and on.........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-28-2017, 07:17 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,396,115 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by eugeniomerill View Post
I see Atlanta is 2nd.
I don't understand why anyone would vote for Atlanta over San Diego.

Atlanta has all negatives of San Diego; high cost-of-living, insane traffic and high crime.

While Atlanta has none of the pluses that San Diego offers; low crime, perfect weather, beaches, mountains, sheer beauty.

That's not to say ATL is a bad or ugly place - but it doesn't even come close to San Diego by comparison. So why would anyone choose Atlanta over San Diego?
COL is increasing in Atlanta as in other places, but to say it has a high cost of living similar to San Diego is just not accurate.

I'd choose Atlanta over San Diego easily--more affordable, much more robust Black culture, closer to friends/family, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 07:24 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,268,124 times
Reputation: 7586
Only NYC is a tier 1 city. And none of those in the list qualifies tier 2 (Chicago, LA, Boston etc).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,334,259 times
Reputation: 3562
Because the scope of this discussion is centered on urban life and amenities, I would rank tiers like this:

Tier 1: Limitless urban lifestyle and amenities
NYC (urban & amenities galore!)

Tier 2: Large urban life with enough amenities and urban character to keep an urban-lover happy for decades
LA (less urban, but tons of amenities)
Chicago (more urban with lots of amenities)
SF (more urban with lots of amenities)
Boston (more urban with lots of amenities)
Philly (more urban with lots of amenities)
DC (more urban, but with lots of amenities)

Tier 3: Either a smaller city with enough urban character to satisfy, or a big enough city/metro to offer a lot of amenities
Seattle (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Miami (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Houston (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Dallas (not very urban, but with lots of amenities)
Atlanta (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Phoenix (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
etc.


Again, this is based on the OP. This is not about GDP or other intangibles. My line of thought balancing between an urban lifestyle and how many amenities the metro offers overall.

For example, I had a friend who had lived in NYC, Chicago, New Orleans and then Atlanta. He was an urban lover, similar to how the OP framed up his/her criteria. He loved NYC and Chicago. He initially loved NO, but it was too small and while there was a good amount of urban character, he got bored with it eventually. He didn't care for Atlanta as much and moved back to Chicago quickly. It wasn't that Atlanta wasn't a good city or didn't have pockets of good urbanity, it was that he wanted more of a big city urban experience.

IMPORTANT: This is all subjective, including my list above.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 09:22 AM
 
21,196 posts, read 30,388,339 times
Reputation: 19627
For what it's worth, Atlanta makes an appearance on the Global Cities Index that's conducted every year and is among just eight American cities. https://www.atkearney.com/research-s...novation/10192
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 09:23 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,396,115 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Because the scope of this discussion is centered on urban life and amenities, I would rank tiers like this:

Tier 1: Limitless urban lifestyle and amenities
NYC (urban & amenities galore!)

Tier 2: Large urban life with enough amenities and urban character to keep an urban-lover happy for decades
LA (less urban, but tons of amenities)
Chicago (more urban with lots of amenities)
SF (more urban with lots of amenities)
Boston (more urban with lots of amenities)
Philly (more urban with lots of amenities)
DC (more urban, but with lots of amenities)

Tier 3: Either a smaller city with enough urban character to satisfy, or a big enough city/metro to offer a lot of amenities
Seattle (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Miami (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Houston (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Dallas (not very urban, but with lots of amenities)
Atlanta (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Phoenix (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
etc.


Again, this is based on the OP. This is not about GDP or other intangibles. My line of thought balancing between an urban lifestyle and how many amenities the metro offers overall.

For example, I had a friend who had lived in NYC, Chicago, New Orleans and then Atlanta. He was an urban lover, similar to how the OP framed up his/her criteria. He loved NYC and Chicago. He initially loved NO, but it was too small and while there was a good amount of urban character, he got bored with it eventually. He didn't care for Atlanta as much and moved back to Chicago quickly. It wasn't that Atlanta wasn't a good city or didn't have pockets of good urbanity, it was that he wanted more of a big city urban experience.

IMPORTANT: This is all subjective, including my list above.
That's a very reasonable tiering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Ithaca, New York
360 posts, read 248,756 times
Reputation: 214
Atlanta, GA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 09:29 AM
 
2,512 posts, read 2,274,345 times
Reputation: 1830
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Because the scope of this discussion is centered on urban life and amenities, I would rank tiers like this:

Tier 1: Limitless urban lifestyle and amenities
NYC (urban & amenities galore!)

Tier 2: Large urban life with enough amenities and urban character to keep an urban-lover happy for decades
LA (less urban, but tons of amenities)
Chicago (more urban with lots of amenities)
SF (more urban with lots of amenities)
Boston (more urban with lots of amenities)
Philly (more urban with lots of amenities)
DC (more urban, but with lots of amenities)

Tier 3: Either a smaller city with enough urban character to satisfy, or a big enough city/metro to offer a lot of amenities
Seattle (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Miami (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Houston (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Dallas (not very urban, but with lots of amenities)
Atlanta (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Phoenix (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
etc.


Again, this is based on the OP. This is not about GDP or other intangibles. My line of thought balancing between an urban lifestyle and how many amenities the metro offers overall.

For example, I had a friend who had lived in NYC, Chicago, New Orleans and then Atlanta. He was an urban lover, similar to how the OP framed up his/her criteria. He loved NYC and Chicago. He initially loved NO, but it was too small and while there was a good amount of urban character, he got bored with it eventually. He didn't care for Atlanta as much and moved back to Chicago quickly. It wasn't that Atlanta wasn't a good city or didn't have pockets of good urbanity, it was that he wanted more of a big city urban experience.

IMPORTANT: This is all subjective, including my list above.
Makes sense. I can relate to your friends experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 09:45 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,979 posts, read 3,462,814 times
Reputation: 2455
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Because the scope of this discussion is centered on urban life and amenities, I would rank tiers like this:

Tier 1: Limitless urban lifestyle and amenities
NYC (urban & amenities galore!)

Tier 2: Large urban life with enough amenities and urban character to keep an urban-lover happy for decades
LA (less urban, but tons of amenities)
Chicago (more urban with lots of amenities)
SF (more urban with lots of amenities)
Boston (more urban with lots of amenities)
Philly (more urban with lots of amenities)
DC (more urban, but with lots of amenities)

Tier 3: Either a smaller city with enough urban character to satisfy, or a big enough city/metro to offer a lot of amenities
Seattle (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Miami (slightly less urban with slightly less amenities)
Houston (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Dallas (not very urban, but with lots of amenities)
Atlanta (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
Phoenix (not urban, but with lots of amenities)
etc.


Again, this is based on the OP. This is not about GDP or other intangibles. My line of thought balancing between an urban lifestyle and how many amenities the metro offers overall.

For example, I had a friend who had lived in NYC, Chicago, New Orleans and then Atlanta. He was an urban lover, similar to how the OP framed up his/her criteria. He loved NYC and Chicago. He initially loved NO, but it was too small and while there was a good amount of urban character, he got bored with it eventually. He didn't care for Atlanta as much and moved back to Chicago quickly. It wasn't that Atlanta wasn't a good city or didn't have pockets of good urbanity, it was that he wanted more of a big city urban experience.

IMPORTANT: This is all subjective, including my list above.
All subjective but very accurate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2017, 01:21 PM
 
4,486 posts, read 2,674,615 times
Reputation: 4095
That's a good list.

I'd add a Tier 3b with Minneapolis, Denver, San Diego, Cleveland, and Phoenix (small disagreement there). Detroit would belong in Tier 3a.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top