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Old 07-28-2017, 07:33 AM
 
Location: USA
16,861 posts, read 8,665,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeSides View Post
The Illuminati?

I'm going with the Illuminati also.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,908 posts, read 12,498,556 times
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Geography plays a big part of it.

NY,SF,Bos are all coastal cities in prime locations. Real Estate is scarce compared to non coastal cities.

Philadlephias location is prime but Philadelphia is inland, landlocked There is 60 miles of livable land to the east of Philadlephia which creates more housing supply and less demand. If Philadlephia were directly on the coast it develops much differently,less suburban sprawl, every bit as expensive as NYC and Boston..


Midwests more modest regional location may help keep Chicagos cost down. Sprawl is very convenient for Chicago.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,674 posts, read 8,131,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
Geography plays a big part of it.

NY,SF,Bos are all coastal cities in prime locations. Real Estate is scarce compared to non coastal cities.

Philadlephias location is prime but Philadelphia is inland, landlocked There is 60 miles of livable land to the east of Philadlephia which creates more housing supply and less demand. If Philadlephia were directly on the coast it develops much differently,less suburban sprawl, every bit as expensive as NYC and Boston..


Midwests more modest regional location may help keep Chicagos cost down. Sprawl is very convenient for Chicago.

but D.C is bit inland prices are high lol and Denver is more expensive than Philly
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,908 posts, read 12,498,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
but D.C is bit inland prices are high lol and Denver is more expensive than Philly
DC is an anomally.Home to the Federal Government and the spoils of having Trillions of Dollars rolling thru town. If the Fed Govt was in Philly instead of Washington the economies of the two regions would flip flop.

Denver is also a bit of an anomally. The Eastern range is almost nonexistent of humans and to the west you have the Rockie Mountains, the Rockies are tough to build upon. Geography plays a big part in Denvers relatively high housing cost.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:37 AM
 
11,158 posts, read 22,303,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
so your personally experience is more informative than official statistics?

I am not saying Chicago is a bad place to live but to deny its crimes is ridiculous.
I don't think he was denying crime, but for this comparison if you're looking at gainfully employed people who aren't going to be living in the violent areas on the west and south side - crime isn't a daily, weekly or probably yearly issue for a large majority of people in the city.

I've been here 16 years living in the heart of the city, relying on transit for everything and working downtown - I know of three people impacted by crime. One friend had his car broken into about 8 years ago, one friend got into a fight on the street about 10 years ago and one girl back 15 years ago had her house robbed when she left all her windows open while she was at work.

I would say Chicago is affordable because of supply and demand, and that it has a ton of housing and a ton of land area to work with. There's ample room to throw up housing if it's even slightly profitable.

The city has put up over 120,000 new housing units since the year 2000 and the population hasn't increased. Most all of that housing would be nice new to luxury housing since that's what makes a profit these days. Out with the old housing and in with the new, but the demand isn't so high that people are snapping them up at a huge premium. You can still get decent prices.

Being at the center of the country, the center of the railroads and highway systems means that Chicago has very easy and fairly cheap access to most all goods, food, supplies, lumbar, raw materials, etc. There isn't much here that's a constraint. Be it isolation, population stresses, geographical features, etc.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,510 posts, read 2,953,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
DC is an anomally.Home to the Federal Government and the spoils of having Trillions of Dollars rolling thru town. If the Fed Govt was in Philly instead of Washington the economies of the two regions would flip flop.

Denver is also a bit of an anomally. The Eastern range is almost nonexistent of humans and to the west you have the Rockie Mountains, the Rockies are tough to build upon. Geography plays a big part in Denvers relatively high housing cost.
Yea, I think the areas east of the Front Range are sparsely populated due to water and agricultural issues--technically, there's plenty of land there to sprawl, but I don't think it could support the population required.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:44 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,938 posts, read 3,419,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
DC is an anomally.Home to the Federal Government and the spoils of having Trillions of Dollars rolling thru town. If the Fed Govt was in Philly instead of Washington the economies of the two regions would flip flop.
The "spoils of government" is not everything. DC has more Fortune 500 companies than Philly, in fact i believe its double the amount.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,434 posts, read 7,493,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainrock View Post
DC is an anomally.Home to the Federal Government and the spoils of having Trillions of Dollars rolling thru town. If the Fed Govt was in Philly instead of Washington the economies of the two regions would flip flop.

Denver is also a bit of an anomally. The Eastern range is almost nonexistent of humans and to the west you have the Rockie Mountains, the Rockies are tough to build upon. Geography plays a big part in Denvers relatively high housing cost.
Exactly. Denver is also growing a lot faster. In fact, it's one of the cities that are likely in the midst of a housing bubble (Denver, northern Front Range real estate party ends in late 2019, new forecast predicts – The Denver Post), but nevertheless faster growth will always translate into much greater home price appreciation at a local level.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,434 posts, read 7,493,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
The "spoils of government" is not everything. DC has more Fortune 500 companies than Philly, in fact i believe its double the amount.
You and I both know, however, that many of those F500 companies are in the region because of access to the nation's capital for lucrative contracts, lobbying, etc. etc.

That's not a knock against DC--government is just its fundamental DNA, and the vast majority of its economy, in both the public and private sectors, revolve around that.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:53 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,938 posts, read 3,419,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
You and I both know, however, that many of those F500 companies are in the region because of access to the nation's capital for lucrative contracts, lobbying, etc. etc.

That's not a knock against DC--government is just its fundamental DNA, and vast majority of its economy, in both the public and private sectors, revolve around that.
Well its a win-win then. DC has access to three major airports vs Philly having one in close proximity.

Philly does give people a decent bang for their buck I believe, with a great location on the East Coast. It's a wonder how long things will stay the same.
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