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Old 09-22-2017, 07:38 AM
 
1,415 posts, read 677,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I think people are defining "destination city" differently. No question Milwaukee has large scale events and a lot to offer. It's just that I think of San Fran, NYC, Chicago, Miami, etc. as destination cities. I'm not even sure I'd consider places like Boston or Philly as true destination cities in the more high-profile marketing sense. Although I would consider Philly and Boston much closer to that definition than Milwaukee, but that's another discussion.
I perfectly well, understand the definition. I'm just saying, (because I lived in Chicago AND Milwaukee), that people travel back and forth regularly. It is a destination for many who live in Chicago...that was my point.
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:52 AM
 
Location: In the heights
20,117 posts, read 21,737,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I think people are defining "destination city" differently. No question Milwaukee has large scale events and a lot to offer. It's just that I think of San Fran, NYC, Chicago, Miami, etc. as destination cities. I'm not even sure I'd consider places like Boston or Philly as true destination cities in the more high-profile marketing sense. Although I would consider Philly and Boston much closer to that definition than Milwaukee, but that's another discussion.
Though DC is definitely a destination city. Having NYC and DC accessible from several other major cities and to each other drives a lot of car, bus and train traffic.

Chicago has a decent cluster of cities that could be viable for high speed rail distances around it with Indianapolis, Detroit, Milwaukee, and St. Louis though it's doubtful we'll see any headway on this with the current administration.

Of course, this is certainly a relatively minor facet since Philadelphia is in that corridor and is about as affordable as Chicago is. Meanwhile, SF gets access to only Sacramento as a nearby major city and LA gets access to San Diego. That being said, Philadelphia's near term prospects are probably better than Chicago's and I'd attribute at least a bit of that to being so close and accessible to NYC as I've known several people who have made the move from NYC to Philadelphia.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; 09-22-2017 at 08:01 AM..
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:02 AM
 
7,177 posts, read 3,872,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
First of all, a lot (but definitely not all) of construction is happening downtown in Chicago which you could characterize as a booming part of a city. The greater downtown area (Near North, Near South, Near West, and the Loop) grew a combined 9.3% in population between 2010 and 2015. When 2016 data by tract comes out in a few months it'll be higher than that no doubt.

In any case, I think that the prices of the city have stayed fairly flat if you only look at it from the city level statistics. That much is true. However, right now if you know exactly what's going on you know it's completely tied to the area or region of the city. The truth is that most areas have seen growth since 2010 - with a few areas such as downtown as a handful of other neighborhoods seeing very healthy growth. Many others are seeing growth but nothing amazing. It's one section of town that is losing almost as much as fast growing downtown has gained, which offsets. Pretty much goes for the prices. However, in many areas, not just downtown - but ones like Logan Square that have seen a healthy amount of new construction - prices for older homes/condos has increased too. It hasn't kept them in check like you think they are.

Example from Logan Square of an old multi unit building. Sold for $208K in 2011 and is now listed at $390K. That's an 87.5% price increase in 6 years.
https://www.realtor.com/realestatean...7_M84008-74048

Lakeview - old house that sold for $377K in 2011 and is now listed at $525K. 40% price increase in 6 years:
https://www.realtor.com/realestatean...3_M86520-04403
Gee, I wonder why this house appreciated so much?

Quote:
With over $100,000 in upgrades, almost everything is brand new
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
3,927 posts, read 2,339,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriz Brown View Post
People in NYC visit Philly, Boston and DC all the time.

Where are you getting your information from? Lol.
From himself. Apparently since he never visited other cities it meant all the other residents didn't either.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:25 AM
 
7,177 posts, read 3,872,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
From himself. Apparently since he never visited other cities it meant all the other residents didn't either.
Of course people visit other cities, but to pretend that proximity to the cities is a major selling point for New York is a bit disingenuous. New York itself is the selling point. Hell, multiple airports with comparatively cheap airfare is a bigger selling point for New York than being four hours away from DC and Boston. The average New Yorker just doesn't think about those cities on a regular basis. No one is moving to New York because it's close to other cities. I'm sorry.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:34 AM
 
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Two big factors:

1) incomes NYC, Bos, SF have higher median incomes than Chi or Philly. Higher income = more ability to pay.
2) population growth SF, Bos, NYC have grown consistently for 30 years. Chi and Philly are still smaller than in 1980. Demand is lower relative to existing building stock. Rehabs on abandoned buildings are still a thing in Philly/Chi. It's mostly new construction at this point in the more expensive cities.

And one that is less clear cut..
tight zoning this is a tougher one. Its probably more a factor when comparing SF and Boston to Chicago/Philly. Chicago (and to a lesser extent central Philly) is designed to be a major world city with lots of room for growth in its core, Bos is basically a midsized city that is struggling with how to grow vs preserve its small scale character. SF is a little bigger/denser than Boston, but basically in the same boat.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
3,927 posts, read 2,339,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Of course people visit other cities, but to pretend that proximity to the cities is a major selling point for New York is a bit disingenuous. New York itself is the selling point. Hell, multiple airports with comparatively cheap airfare is a bigger selling point for New York than being four hours away from DC and Boston. The average New Yorker just doesn't think about those cities on a regular basis. No one is moving to New York because it's close to other cities. I'm sorry.
You can say that about almost every major city. New York is New York, but being in the middle of the BoWash corridor is a huge plus.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:02 AM
 
8,641 posts, read 8,778,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Of course people visit other cities, but to pretend that proximity to the cities is a major selling point for New York is a bit disingenuous. New York itself is the selling point. Hell, multiple airports with comparatively cheap airfare is a bigger selling point for New York than being four hours away from DC and Boston. The average New Yorker just doesn't think about those cities on a regular basis. No one is moving to New York because it's close to other cities. I'm sorry.
Unless it's within 2-2.5 hours it's not a selling point at all. Nobody moves to Boston because it's near NYC. Maybe Philly because you could realistically spend and afternoon up in NYC any time you feel like it.
Selling points for Boston is more New England stuff, access to Providence, Salem, Cape Cod, White Mountains, Lakes, NH/ME seacoast etc not a city 4 hours away.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:41 AM
 
7,177 posts, read 3,872,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Unless it's within 2-2.5 hours it's not a selling point at all. Nobody moves to Boston because it's near NYC. Maybe Philly because you could realistically spend and afternoon up in NYC any time you feel like it.
Selling points for Boston is more New England stuff, access to Providence, Salem, Cape Cod, White Mountains, Lakes, NH/ME seacoast etc not a city 4 hours away.
Yup.
Philly, the Bos-Wash city that most conveniently located, with respect to the others, is also the cheapest and least in-demand, which kinda negates the argument that people pay more for proximity to other cities.
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Old 09-22-2017, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,612 posts, read 24,802,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Remember NY is a hub, as it's basically the geographic center of the Northeast. So Scranton or Bringhamton to Boston is via NYC, Albany or Utica to Philly as well. So it's not necessarily that City pair that's popular.
That's true, but what does that have to do with the highest volume routes, which are NYC to PHI and DC to NYC?
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