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Old 11-14-2017, 01:04 PM
 
10,287 posts, read 12,404,411 times
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https://americas.uli.org/awards/chic...ence-finalist/

Chicago's riverwalk was just named in a ULI award.
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Old 11-14-2017, 01:23 PM
 
2,303 posts, read 1,066,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Even with that, there are plenty of lakefront restaurants and bars in beachhouses and on the rooftops as well as laid out on the sand itself. Food and drinks, tables and umbrellas, lush plants and palms set around everywhere. I always laugh when I go because it feels so tropical and "vacationy" in the summer, I don't feel like I'm in the city at all.

Castaways and The Shore Club at North Ave beach, The Dock at Montrose Beach, the services set up on Oak Street Beach, The Lakefront Restaurant at Fullerton, Nacho Mama Beach Bar, Caffe Oliva, Del Campos, Waterfront Cafť, Pier 31, and all the other food shacks, etc you can choose from as well.

Not to mention about a dozen bars and restaurants set up on the Riverwalk which dumps right into the lakefront downtown.

My favorite on the riverwalk section is always Island Tiki Hut!!
Yes, in walking Millennium Park to Navy Pier I found this first pic I took. Only in summer I believe.. Then on Oak St beach Tiki-bar.

Last edited by DavePa; 05-01-2018 at 07:22 AM..
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Old 11-14-2017, 02:41 PM
 
Location: The Gold Coast, Chicago
281 posts, read 132,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Normally I don't do this when we're talking subjective opinions. But come on, have you ever left the USA?



Try Miami/Miami Beach for starters (technically two cities but combined, smaller than Chicago).

And, I really really really don't see what's special about Chicago's waterfront. Maybe I missed something when I went there (to the waterfront) years and years ago (I'm usually in Chicago for business when it's not warm unlike you tourists).

I just saw a bunch of tall buildings, sand and beach. No European strand with cafes, restaurants and bars lining the sand? Really can someone point me to what's so special about a bunch of skyscrapers lining a lake?




No, just no. Chicago wouldn't make the top 25 list for best architecture. That list would be swamped by European and East Asian cities.

European cities like Prague, Vienna, St. Petersburg, Firenze, Barcelona, the list could go on and on and on from large to small.

Even East Asian cities, take Shanghai for example. Areas of the city look like Paris, areas have those tall, new, shiny skyscrapers that Chicago has (except these are newer and nicer), and areas have that Oriental architecture going on, and then there are the commie-style tenements. Just the variety there would blow your mind.

Speaking of which, I'm not with you Chicago is best in the USA.



Highly recommend it. I like lots of cities around the world but Chicago is one I keep coming back to

I don't see why Chicago earned this "All American City." When I think of an all American city, I think of Los Angeles, or better yet San Diego. Car centric. McMansions. Etc
Interesting. I guess you have a point. In America, most people value cars and sprawl. Los Angeles brings everything that’s bad about America to the forefront (extreme traffic, extreme sprawl, and widespread sleaziness).

There are only six pure compact, walking cities in America: NYC, Chicago, Boston, DC, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. These cities are the exception to the rule rather than the rule itself. So if anything, the finest cities here are inherently anti-American, which is actually a compliment.
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Old 11-14-2017, 02:42 PM
 
Location: So California
8,372 posts, read 8,444,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Codederick View Post
Interesting. I guess you have a point. In America, most people value cars and sprawl. Los Angeles brings everything thatís bad about America to the forefront (extreme traffic, extreme sprawl, and widespread sleaziness).

There are only six pure compact, walking cities in America: NYC, Chicago, Boston, DC, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. These cities are the exception to the rule rather than the rule itself. So if anything, the finest cities here are inherently anti-American, which is actually a compliment.
That's a load of bullsh*t! Nice job!!
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Old 11-14-2017, 03:19 PM
 
Location: San Jose
1,412 posts, read 436,831 times
Reputation: 1542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codederick View Post
Interesting. I guess you have a point. In America, most people value cars and sprawl. Los Angeles brings everything thatís bad about America to the forefront (extreme traffic, extreme sprawl, and widespread sleaziness).

There are only six pure compact, walking cities in America: NYC, Chicago, Boston, DC, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. These cities are the exception to the rule rather than the rule itself. So if anything, the finest cities here are inherently anti-American, which is actually a compliment.
Other countries define themselves by their best qualities, we choose and allow ourselves to define what is "American" by our worst qualities. How is New York and Chicago less American then LA or Houston? Also Suburbia was not an American idea, its English. Car centric town planning started in central Europe. Compact, skyscraper dominated cities is an original American idea. Hence that should be what we consider to be very American.
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Old 11-14-2017, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,304 posts, read 17,928,730 times
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Interesting how Miami Beach was brought up for integrated with water features. I mean that's kind of odd for anyone who is actually familiar with Miami Beach. Very walkable city in parts - I actually really like Miami Beach in some areas. Comparing to the river though in Chicago as far as urban intergration goes is really weird. It's not a good comparison at all. Maybe the lake in certain areas versus Miami Beach, yes, but the river? No. Not even close to the same thing. Even though Miami Beach has a bunch of high rises (and low rises) along the ocean, they're pretty much all buffered by the beach (and some other small green space usually). The river in Chicago has buildings literally right next to the water with no buffer and where there is buffer is a lot smaller of a space than in Miami Beach. Also the buildings on the river in Chicago are a lot denser. They're two separate things - I mean technically speaking, the river in Chicago has a better integration with the water itself than somewhere like Miami Beach, but they both serve two different functions and they're completely different from one another even in how everything is organized. I mean hell, there are some parts of Ft. Lauderdale which are a better comparison to the river in Chicago than Miami Beach as far as integration into actual water goes.


I'm really not sure how anybody could compare these two things. They're completely different:
https://www.google.com/maps/@25.7986...7i13312!8i6656

to

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8870...7i10240!8i5120


I've been all around the world and I personally think that with the new expansions of the riverwalk that it's pretty special. If you are only familiar with the old riverwalk and haven't gone through the new expansions, then sure - but the new stuff is quite awesome. I have friends from Paris, Amsterdam, and various parts of Asia who LOVED it and ate it up when they were visiting Chicago. My girlfriend is a NYC fan girl, but everytime she's visited Chicago since this opened and we are relaxing there, she'll bring up wanting to move to Chicago (always brought up when we were at the river walk).

Last edited by marothisu; 11-14-2017 at 05:57 PM..
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Old 11-14-2017, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,333 posts, read 7,234,812 times
Reputation: 2709
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Interesting how Miami Beach was brought up for integrated with water features. I mean that's kind of odd for anyone who is actually familiar with Miami Beach. Very walkable city in parts - I actually really like Miami Beach in some areas. Comparing to the river though in Chicago as far as urban intergration goes is really weird. It's not a good comparison at all. Maybe the lake in certain areas versus Miami Beach, yes, but the river? No. Not even close to the same thing. Even though Miami Beach has a bunch of high rises (and low rises) along the ocean, they're pretty much all buffered by the beach (and some other small green space usually). The river in Chicago has buildings literally right next to the water with no buffer and where there is buffer is a lot smaller of a space than in Miami Beach. Also the buildings on the river in Chicago are a lot denser. They're two separate things - I mean technically speaking, the river in Chicago has a better integration with the water itself than somewhere like Miami Beach, but they both serve two different functions and they're completely different from one another even in how everything is organized. I mean hell, there are some parts of Ft. Lauderdale which are a better comparison to the river in Chicago than Miami Beach as far as integration into actual water goes.


I'm really not sure how anybody could compare these two things. They're completely different:
https://www.google.com/maps/@25.7986...7i13312!8i6656

to

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8870...7i10240!8i5120


I've been all around the world and I personally think that with the new expansions of the riverwalk that it's pretty special. I have friends Paris, Amsterdam, and various parts of Asia who LOVED it and ate it up.
Miami is subtropical with Caribbean vibes and Chicago is more urban world class city #3 city in U.S
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Old 11-14-2017, 05:59 PM
 
377 posts, read 165,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Interesting how Miami Beach was brought up for integrated with water features.
I brought up Miami/Miami Beach. Because if you combine these two cities together (again, much smaller than Chicago) then you have the most integrated city with the water in America.

Downtown Miami is bisected by canals, many of which remind you of the riverwalk, just on a smaller scale. You have the Bay of Biscayne, many islands, all of which with urban areas, until you hit the barrier island of Miami Beach which again has numerous buildings.

Again, Chicago can simply not compare to that level of water integration. Someone made the claim that Chicago is the "best integrated water city in the USA" I refuted it.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:02 PM
 
377 posts, read 165,593 times
Reputation: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Huh, itís interesting that you canít actually answer anything straight, probably because thereís nothing to what youíre saying. Just some basic trolling, so youíre going to be ignored now
No, I'm just pointing out the obvious. You haven't been to Hong Kong. You are talking just for the sake of conversation. Because if you actually have been to Hong Kong, you'd know that area I mention looks like a "corner" due to the topography of the hills squeezing the urban development.

But since you haven't been to Hong Kong, you don't realize it and thusly just made an erroneous claim.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:05 PM
 
377 posts, read 165,593 times
Reputation: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
It is what it is, your opinion is perfectly valid, but based on what you're saying don't expect anyone else to agree with you who has been to and explored Chicago and seen what it's all about.
I don't care if anyone agrees with me, we're having a discussion. Not a "rah rah fest."

With you, you called me "demented" because I disagree on Chicago having "skyscraper canyons" or some other inflated praise of a city. Which to me feels pretty sad. Is your ego that fragile?
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