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Old 08-01-2017, 09:52 PM
 
1,419 posts, read 680,899 times
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Uh oh, I hope this isn't a Cleveland thread....it could easily trend that way, if the posts, so far, mean anything. Heed the moratorium on "Cleveland" threads.
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Old 08-01-2017, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
996 posts, read 492,763 times
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Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Uh oh, I hope this isn't a Cleveland thread....it could easily trend that way, if the posts, so far, mean anything. Heed the moratorium on "Cleveland" threads.
No it's not a Cleveland thread, Cleveland has been used more of an example for Rust Belt cities being scrutinized based on their pasts just like Buffalo and Detroit have been as well.
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Old 08-01-2017, 10:12 PM
 
1,419 posts, read 680,899 times
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"There is a moratorium on all threads involving Cleveland....." I'm not a moderator, but I think it's good to listen to them.
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Old 08-02-2017, 12:09 AM
 
3,581 posts, read 2,024,452 times
Reputation: 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The most urban parts of Seattle outside of the CBD remind me of Shadyside in Pittsburgh, which really isn't even in the top 10 most urban neighborhoods in the city (at least when considering built form).
I love Pittsburgh but disagree with this.

The U District is basically Oakland.

Capitol Hill and First Hill (near CBD) have some census tracts than are denser anything in Pittsburgh in residential terms. These are multifamily at a scale that doesn't exist in Pittsburgh.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,910 posts, read 11,004,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I love Pittsburgh but disagree with this.

The U District is basically Oakland.

Capitol Hill and First Hill (near CBD) have some census tracts than are denser anything in Pittsburgh in residential terms. These are multifamily at a scale that doesn't exist in Pittsburgh.
Oh, I agree that Capitol Hill is much denser than Shadyside. I just meant they're similar because of the following:

1. Initial built environment which was dominated by detached-single family homes, with historic medium-sized walkup apartments mixed in.

2. A lot of later infill as houses were replaced by apartment buildings from the mid 20th century onward.

3. Lack of a continuous street wall.

4. Lots of street trees and greenery.

Capitol Hill in Seattle has had a hell of a lot more infill than Shadyside, but the overall built form of the neighborhoods is pretty similar - offering a lot of built density without having a very traditionally dense urban built form.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:13 AM
 
7,177 posts, read 3,878,487 times
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Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
I agree, I think Chicago gets a pass for their flaws too.
I completely disagree. You can't mention Chicago without having discussion about its crime, whereas DC has a similar crime rate and it's almost never mentioned.
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
996 posts, read 492,763 times
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Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I completely disagree. You can't mention Chicago without having discussion about its crime, whereas DC has a similar crime rate and it's almost never mentioned.
I say that because Chicago is still a tourist destination and a major market despite its crime rep. But, cities like Cleveland or Detroit are more talked about for their negatives because a lot of people's perceptions are still stuck in the '60s. And, they say the Rust Belt is ignorant and unsophisticated but there are some people who have the same traits as they say about the Rust Belt. Plus, they'll never talk about DC's crime rate because it's the political capital of the U.S., if not the world.

Last edited by QCongress83216; 08-02-2017 at 09:41 AM..
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,910 posts, read 11,004,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
I say that because Chicago is still a tourist destination and a major market despite its crime rep. But, cities like Cleveland or Detroit are more talked about for their negatives because a lot of people's perceptions are still stuck in the '60s. And, they say the Rust Belt is ignorant and unsophisticated but there are some people who have the same traits as they say about the Rust Belt.
Cities are only "in" the Rust Belt while they are perceived as struggling, eventually graduating out of it if they return to growth.

There was a time where not only Chicago, but Boston and even Seattle would have been considered to be Rust Belt. No longer of course.
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:29 AM
 
8,648 posts, read 8,784,992 times
Reputation: 5185
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
I say that because Chicago is still a tourist destination and a major market despite its crime rep. But, cities like Cleveland or Detroit are more talked about for their negatives because a lot of people's perceptions are still stuck in the '60s. And, they say the Rust Belt is ignorant and unsophisticated but there are some people who have the same traits as they say about the Rust Belt.
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/29/r...-close-up.html
https://www.forbes.com/forbes/welcom...ww.google.com/
https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/cle...e-arts-culture

These are the headlines about a city with 37% Poverty and losing population. Tell me again how the media glosses over East Coast Cities problems?
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,867 posts, read 6,819,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Cities are only "in" the Rust Belt while they are perceived as struggling, eventually graduating out of it if they return to growth.

There was a time where not only Chicago, but Boston and even Seattle would have been considered to be Rust Belt. No longer of course.
There are declining industrial towns in Massachusetts, but not one person calls that the Rust Belt. Because the Rust Belt really only refers to the "Great Lakes" area.
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