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View Poll Results: Most urban
Seattle 37 22.29%
Baltimore 76 45.78%
Pittsburgh 15 9.04%
Cincinati 7 4.22%
New Orleans 8 4.82%
Miami 23 13.86%
Voters: 166. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-02-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: San Diego
559 posts, read 513,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward234 View Post
Belltown, sections of Capitol Hill, First Hill and parts of lower Queen Anne are structurally dense residential neighborhoods.
Ballard, Fremont, and the U-district feel quite dense as well.

I understand this thread is about urbanity, but Seattle's vibrancy in its surrounding neighborhoods is exceptional.
Seattle just gets knocked for not having row homes and we all know it, which makes no sense to me.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,914 posts, read 11,022,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I agree that Pittsburgh is being overlooked in this thread. It is a very urban city, but due to topography, has scattered pockets of urbanity.
It honestly has as much to do with urban renewal as it does with topography. Before the 1950s, there was a solid band of urbanity which ran up and down the river valleys and up through the East End of the city. While Downtown was relatively well-preserved for a Rust Belt city, the surrounding areas were decimated, resulting in a few major bits of urban development which are no longer in walking distance from one another.

Going around the city -

Northside - Prior to urban renewal, the entire flat part of the lower North Side was packed with rowhouses. Redevelopment destroyed essentially all of Old Allegheny City (the central neighborhood surrounded by the park - nothing remains but the churches), the Ward (now the North Shore and vacant land for highways), Schweitzer Lock (was up the Allegheny from the present North Shore - now entirely gone minus a few rowhouses, and the East Street Valley (demolished to make way for 279 North). 279 North also took out a few blocks of East Allegheny, cutting the neighborhood in two. Manchester was also bisected by highways, with the riverward portion obliterated for an industrial zone, and the business district entirely eliminated. Both neighborhoods survived however. California Kirkbride lost so much to blight it's basically not there any longer. Allegheny West, Central North Side (including the Mexican War Streets), and Troy Hill all survived reasonably intact.

East End - All of the closer neighborhoods to downtown largely lost their urban fabric. The Strip District because it was converted into a warehouse area in the early to mid 20th century. The Hill District due to a mixture of urban renewal (demolishing the entire lower hill for the Civic Arena) and blight during the urban riots era. And Uptown saw much of its historic rowhouse stock demolished to make way for surface parking for sports games and car commuters (although a few hundred rowhouses remain). Once you get past this ring, Pittsburgh has plenty of intact urban neighborhoods however - Polish Hill, Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Garfield, and Oakland being the most notable ones.

South - South Side Flats dodged a few bullets during the urban renewal era, and survived to the present basically intact. The other southern neighborhoods are all rugged in topography and mostly were built out in the late 19th/early 20th century, and thus aren't as urban. Allentown has a gritty sort of charm though.

West - West End Village is the only notable old urban neighborhood in this part of the city. Only around half of the urban fabric is remaining.

The "old urban" footprint extends outside of the city by a bit in places, but we're really only considering city limits in this exercise. Still, I'll note that this, this, this, and this are all not in the city of Pittsburgh.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:13 PM
 
36 posts, read 20,349 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by dapper23 View Post
Ballard, Fremont, and the U-district feel quite dense as well.

I understand this thread is about urbanity, but Seattle's vibrancy in its surrounding neighborhoods is exceptional.
Seattle just gets knocked for not having row homes and we all know it, which makes no sense to me.
It's more like you people don't understand the characteristics that make for impressive urban cities (but you're from a Sunbelt city so I wouldn't expect you to). Seattle is nothing special, not by any measure. It's only a small step above Denver, it's not surprising it can't compete with most legacy cities.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,914 posts, read 11,022,356 times
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I found this old post I did showing streetviews of urban portions of Pittsburgh. I'll paste it here for discussion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Here's a group of streetviews I put together for a thread on another forum from the classically urban residential streets in Pitttsburgh. I excluded business districts.

Apartment Districts:

North Oakland
North Oakland
South Oakland
Shadyside
Shadyside
Shadyside
Squirrel Hill
Squirrel Hill

Rowhouse areas (limit of one per neighborhood, because there are so many):

Allegheny West
Manchester
Central North Side
Deutschtown
Spring Garden
Troy Hill
Polish Hill
Lower Lawrenceville
Central Lawrenceville
Upper Lawrenceville
Bloomfield
Garfield*
East Liberty*
Shadyside*
South Oakland
Uptown
South Side
Hazelwood*
Homewood*

* Not indicative of majority of housing stock in neighborhood.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,914 posts, read 11,022,356 times
Reputation: 9844
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelterSkelter View Post
It's more like you people don't understand the characteristics that make for impressive urban cities (but you're from a Sunbelt city so I wouldn't expect you to). Seattle is nothing special, not by any measure. It's only a small step above Denver, it's not surprising it can't compete with most legacy cities.
I disagree that Seattle is nothing special. Seattle does it better than anywhere else. The only issue is "it" just isn't as good as historic urban fabric because even in the most pro-urban iteration, you can't build traditional urban neighborhoods in a post-Euclidian zoning U.S.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,505 posts, read 2,738,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward234 View Post
Some Seattle streetviews from all over the city:

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6083...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6006...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.5983...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6160...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6610...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6656...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6134...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.5622...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6246...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.5490...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.5495...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6138...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6496...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.5585...7i13312!8i6656
Very nice and quite urban.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:25 PM
 
36 posts, read 20,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I disagree that Seattle is nothing special. Seattle does it better than anywhere else.
This is where I bow out because I simply can't argue with delusions.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,914 posts, read 11,022,356 times
Reputation: 9844
From another old post of mine focusing on streetviews of business districts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Here's links to most of the the walkable business districts in Pittsburgh. The ones lower down the list ain't all impressive, but they're there.

1. East Carson Street (South Side)
2. Butler Street (Lawrenceville)
3. Penn Avenue (Strip District)
4. Forbes Avenue (Oakland)
5. Murray Avenue (Squirrel Hill)
6. Walnut Street (Shadyside)
7. Liberty Avenue (Bloomfield)
8. Penn Avenue (Garfield)
9. East Ohio Street (Deutschtown)
10. Brookline Boulevard (Brookline)
11. South Highland Avenue (Shadyside/East Liberty)
12. Penn Avenue (East Liberty)
13. Bryant Street (Highland Park)
14. Reynolds Street (Point Breeze)
15. Greenwood Street (Morningside)
16. Ellsworth Avenue (Shadyside)
17. Greenfield Avenue (Greenfield)
18. Murray Avenue (Greenfield)
19. Forbes Avenue (Squirrel Hill)
20. Shiloh Street (Mount Washington)
21. Broadway Avenue (Beechview)
22. East Warrington Avenue (Allentown)
23. West End Village (West End)
24. Western Avenue (Allegheny West)
25. Semple Street (Oakland)
26. South Craig St (Oakland)
27. Federal Street (North Shore)
28. Federal Street (Central North Side)
29. California Avenue (Brighton Heights)
30. Perrysville Avenue (Observatory Hill)
31. Penn Avenue (Bloomfield)
32. North Craig/Centre (Oakland)

Honestly not done. I could think of another five at least, but they mostly aren't impressive. There are maybe a dozen walkable suburban business districts which are relatively intact and active however.
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,914 posts, read 11,022,356 times
Reputation: 9844
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelterSkelter View Post
This is where I bow out because I simply can't argue with delusions.
I'm saying I don't find Seattle's new construction urban form blows my hair back, but grading on a curve, it's done better at making a cohesive urban fabric than any other city which lacked a reasonable 19th century set of bones.

Last edited by eschaton; 08-02-2017 at 02:49 PM..
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:35 PM
 
429 posts, read 278,809 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
From another old post of mine focusing on streetviews of business districts.
Very cool glimpse into Pittsburgh neighborhoods. The Seattle streetviews I posted were hacked-together quickly and less thought out. Seattle has a lot of distinct business districts as well and I'd like to put something like that together to give people a better picture of the city's urban landscape (as with yours, not all would be that impressive, but they're there).
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