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View Poll Results: Most urban
Seattle 37 22.29%
Baltimore 76 45.78%
Pittsburgh 15 9.04%
Cincinati 7 4.22%
New Orleans 8 4.82%
Miami 23 13.86%
Voters: 166. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-02-2017, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,256 posts, read 12,563,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
What was downtown Baltimore lacking in your opinion?
People, living quarters, hotels, major shopping, restaurants. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't great either.
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Old 08-02-2017, 01:45 PM
 
429 posts, read 277,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'm saying I don't find Seattle's new construction urban form blows my hair back, but grading on a curve, it's done it better at making a cohesive urban fabric than any other city which lacked a reasonable 19th century set of bones.
I'm totally on board with that - I think Seattle has done a good job of blending new urban construction with older, more classically urban neighborhoods, particularly in the core.

However, Seattle's urbanity overall really is more of a collage of different styles and (outside the contiguous urban core) a series of somewhat balkanized urban/streetcar-suburban centers and nodes (with admittedly a fair amount of single-family home zones blended in).

In other words, the urban fabric is inconsistent and runs the gamut (hilly terrain and many bodies of water breaking things up don't help), but the cumulative urban experience offers a lot of substance and variety, and fairly bustling/active neighborhood nodes can be found throughout the city. Like LA, I find Seattle to be a fairly difficult urban landscape to explain/categorize.

Last edited by Edward234; 08-02-2017 at 01:54 PM..
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:49 PM
 
3,579 posts, read 2,019,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward234 View Post
It depends on how you define Downtown. The more constrained definition of Downtown is the West Edge and the Retail Core (see map below which shows a portion of Seattle's urban core), but others define it more broadly as anything West of I-5, South of Denny, and North of I-90. First Hill, South Lake Union, Cascade, Capitol Hill (Pike/Pine and Broadway), and Lower Queen Anne are all part of the contiguous urban core but are 100% not part of Downtown.



http://www.stroupecondoblog.com/wp-c...d_location.gif
Many would move the boundary a half-mile north, if the goal is "greater" Downtown. This map omits the fastest-growing wing, South Lake Union. Also Lower Queen Anne (including the Space Needle). And Seattle U and some high-density residential on the east.
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Old 08-02-2017, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,706,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I agree with eschaton's post only I'd switch Miami and New Orleans. The French Quarter has better walkability/vibrancy than anywhere in Miami proper, but it is a tiny area of the city, and that one walkable neighborhood doesn't compensate for relatively low population density and lackluster walkability outside of the core.

The Metrorail running through Brickell and Downtown also adds a more urban feel that NO completely lacks. New Orleans feels more "boutique" urban in some ways more along the lines of Charleston and Savannah.
What do you consider the core of New Orleans?
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I get what you mean about New Orleans, but the issue isn't a lack of walkability. Outside of Downtown/French Quarter, there are five other neighborhoods with 90+ walkscores, and 12 with 89-80. Unlike in Southern California or South Florida, these high walkscore areas tend to have very good walkable business districts too - narrow streets, storefronts right up to the sidewalk, not too many gaps in the street wall, etc.

The problem is more the lack of intensity on the back streets outside of the French Quarter. New Orleans is mostly one-story shotgun housing. It's built in a dense fashion, and much of it is quite old, but there's only so much "urban vibe" this can provide. As a result, it feels like a series of historic small towns smooshed together rather than deeply urban.
What do you mean by lack of intensity? Are you talking about height? I don't get the small town comment either because every city has nodes urbanity with the city.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'm saying I don't find Seattle's new construction urban form blows my hair back, but grading on a curve, it's done better at making a cohesive urban fabric than any other city which lacked a reasonable 19th century set of bones.
100%
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Old 08-02-2017, 03:58 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,245 posts, read 5,537,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwright1 View Post
People, living quarters, hotels, major shopping, restaurants. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't great either.

Major Shopping I can agree with. Downtown Baltimore has 3 smaller shopping areas instead of just one large area: The Galley, Harborplace, Harbor East.

Living Quarters: Downtown Baltimore is currently experiences a major uptick in downtown residential construction. 414 Light Street being the largest, is currently under construction, a apartment complex was just build right beside it, hotels are opening up, other building are being converted from offices to apartment/condos, another large apartment building is about to break ground this fall, another large apartment tower currently being built, which is right next a completely new neighborhood (Harbor Point) that is also currently being built. With addition of two new neighborhoods over the past 10 years, Baltimore is on the right tract.

People: I've noticed that there seems to be more people downtown during non business hours than there are during business hours.

Hotels are popping up all over downtown as well aside from the dozens that have been there for years.
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Old 08-02-2017, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
682 posts, read 681,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwright1 View Post
Old, new what difference does it make? Old rowhouses lined up with no grocery stores or urban amenities is not what I call urban. An example is downtown Baltimore. It's look or 'urban fabric' is old but once you're actually in the thick of things, it's a dud. Downtown Seattle is definitely newer but it is a place I'd rather live than dt Baltimore. It's walkable, has great shopping, nightlife, tons of restaurants, cultural amenities. And it's not just downtown, but Capitol Hill, Ballard, the UDistrict, Madison Park and a few others. When I was in Baltimore last year I was thoroughly disappointed. I see positive changes but it has a lot of work to do.
There are a lot urban amenities in downtown Baltimore it is walkable and what it lacks can be found in neighborhoods that are not downtown. Such as Fells Point (nightlife/shopping/restaurants/cultural), Canton (nightlife), Harbor East (restaurants), Mount Vernon (cultural/national landmark), etc. Lots of cultural amenities all over Baltimore City including those in the Inner Harbor area. Yes there are food deserts in Baltimore's blighted areas but there are many food options/markets/businesses inside many of the row homes in just about every row home neighborhood that is desirable. With the continued development of the cities former industrial sites it will continue to add to its urban identity.

Last edited by Northernest Southernest C; 08-02-2017 at 06:30 PM..
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,906 posts, read 10,994,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
What do you mean by lack of intensity? Are you talking about height? I don't get the small town comment either because every city has nodes urbanity with the city.
I mean that New Orleans is walkable, and feels urban, but the level of urbanity in most neighborhoods feels more like a small historic city along the Atlantic coast than a major city. Or rather, a series of them, since the dense walkable shotgun vernacular just goes on and on.
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Old 08-02-2017, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,272 posts, read 3,339,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I mean that New Orleans is walkable, and feels urban, but the level of urbanity in most neighborhoods feels more like a small historic city along the Atlantic coast than a major city. Or rather, a series of them, since the dense walkable shotgun vernacular just goes on and on.
I agree, New Orleans feels provincial and small town. There are not many residential highrises like some other cities. The urbanity of the city is subtle, and largely historic.
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Old 08-03-2017, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,906 posts, read 10,994,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
I agree, New Orleans feels provincial and small town. There are not many residential highrises like some other cities. The urbanity of the city is subtle, and largely historic.
I don't think a city needs residential highrises to feel highly urban. But the level of built intensity is more similar to the old parts of Savannah or Charleston, as Bajanyakee noted. Or Annapolis, Lancaster, Portland (Maine), etc. Obviously the 19th century built fabric sprawls over a much wider area, which is why it feels more like many cities of that size smashed together than one big metropolis.
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Old 08-03-2017, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,706,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I mean that New Orleans is walkable, and feels urban, but the level of urbanity in most neighborhoods feels more like a small historic city along the Atlantic coast than a major city. Or rather, a series of them, since the dense walkable shotgun vernacular just goes on and on.
I guess I can understand that. What city on the Atlantic coast looks like that?
And it should feel that way, New Orleans never was as large as any of the other legacy cities but I don't think that makes it any less urban, just on a smaller scale.
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