U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Most urban
Seattle 37 22.29%
Baltimore 76 45.78%
Pittsburgh 15 9.04%
Cincinati 7 4.22%
New Orleans 8 4.82%
Miami 23 13.86%
Voters: 166. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: USA
13,275 posts, read 7,277,975 times
Reputation: 9616

Advertisements

Yes, Baltimore is the most urban. Just don't stray too far from the Inner Harbor, or Fells Point. You'll find out what urban really means.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,899 posts, read 10,985,220 times
Reputation: 9777
Quote:
Originally Posted by HelterSkelter View Post
This whole comment makes literally no sense in any aspect, Seattle's "peak" urban neighborhood is nowhere near Baltimore's peak and that includes downtown. Tall high rises don't make a city better from an urban perspective and especially not newly built ones. What makes urban neighborhoods great is walkability, streetwalls, store fronts that are easily accessible and front the sidewalk, small streets. Seattle has hardly any of this and Baltimore is filled with it all over the city. So no, again, there is no "peak" urbanity in Seattle that even comes close in any way to Baltimore's "peak" and it's blatantly obvious. You're just a hometown city boaster. Judging by this criteria Cleveland could have better "peak" urbanity than central Paris.
I will say that while I think Baltimore still edges out Seattle, Seattle is improving by leaps and bounds, while Baltimore is still losing urban fabric to demolition (and the infill it gets in some cases isn't great). Therefore I think Seattle will surpass Baltimore in urban form within a few decades.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,899 posts, read 10,985,220 times
Reputation: 9777
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I don't see how "desirability" or city health impact urbanity. NYC wasn't any less urban in the 70s.
And The Bronx isn't the least urban of the five boroughs either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:10 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,243 posts, read 5,532,292 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
Yes, Baltimore is the most urban. Just don't stray too far from the Inner Harbor, or Fells Point. You'll find out what urban really means.
What will happen if you stray too far from the inner harbor?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: The City
21,945 posts, read 30,797,404 times
Reputation: 7489
this is tough but still would find Baltimore more urban than Seattle. Seattle has a better downtown but as city just doesn't feel as urban to me


I think some arguments could be made that Pittsburgh and Cinci are also more urban on the whole


Seattle and Miami may be better comparators albeit exceling in slightly different ways and growing like crazy
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:14 AM
 
3,568 posts, read 2,014,636 times
Reputation: 3288
Helterskelter: Seattle has a light rail subway including seven underground stations and others under construction. Our transit, walking, and biking shares are better than Baltimore's within city limits per the Census dept 2015 numbers. Buses are a big part of that including a lot of HOV lanes. What are you debating here?

Seattle's houses aren't dense, but the 15% of the city that allows density can be. Much of that is six-story urbanity with street walls. Well over half our housing is multifamily and most of that has street walls.

As for Cleveland and Paris, my point would be exactly the opposite, which should be obvious.

Seattle does have garages in the core, but they're all old. As for vacant lots, tell me where and I'll tell you what's been built there since the photo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,899 posts, read 10,985,220 times
Reputation: 9777
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
What will happen if you stray too far from the inner harbor?
You end up in Fells Point or Federal Hill?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:29 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,243 posts, read 5,532,292 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
You end up in Fells Point or Federal Hill?
I don't know what the poster is insinuating.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,899 posts, read 10,985,220 times
Reputation: 9777
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I don't know what the poster is insinuating.
It appears he's insinuating that "urban" means full of ghetto blacks who will murder white people on sight, and as soon as you are outside of the Inner Harbor, you will be in the ghetto.

Even putting aside the coded racism, it's false. Downtown and Inner Harbor are bordered by several gentrified neighborhoods, including Mt. Vernon, Ridgely's Delight, Otterbein, Federal Hill, Little Italy, and Fells Point. Seton Hill and Jonestown are probably the only two first-ring neighborhoods which suburbanites might be scared of.

Last edited by eschaton; 08-02-2017 at 10:00 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2017, 09:45 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,243 posts, read 5,532,292 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It appears he's insinuating that "urban" means full of ghetto blacks who will murder white people on sight, and as soon as you are outside of the Inner Harbor, you will be in the ghetto.

Even putting aside the coded racism, it's false. Downtown and inner Harbor are bordered by several gentrified neighborhoods, including Mt. Vernon, Ridgely's Delight, Otterbein, Federal Hill, Little Italy, and Fells Point. Seton Hill and Jonestown are probably the only two first-ring neighborhoods which suburbanites might be scared of.
Jonestown is about to get redeveloped.

New developers of Old Town Mall site provide first glimpse of plans - Baltimore Sun
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top