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View Poll Results: Louisville vs. Indianapolis vs. Cincinnati
Louisville 23 28.05%
Indianapolis 15 18.29%
Cincinnati 44 53.66%
Voters: 82. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 08-05-2017, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
929 posts, read 1,698,458 times
Reputation: 602

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralCarmel View Post
Phoenix gets a fair bit of crap, there's no doubt about it. I'd honestly call Indy and Cincy a draw for me, with Louisville being a distant 3rd. And I think Indy has only caught up to Cincy very recently.
Don't forget Atlanta. Not just on this board, but on other internet message boards in general. I wouldn't be surprised if some underrate San Jose(that someone mentioned, can't remember who), though as I've never been to San Jose I won't comment.

Back to this thread though, for once I see a thread where I've been to all 3 cities, so I can compare them. It makes me sad Indy is last place in this thread, since to me Indy and Cincy feel neck and neck as decent cities, then Louisville. While Louisville is 3rd out of these cities to me, it definitely still is a decent one to me. They've done a good job revitalizing their downtown, and the neighborhoods are nice too. Louisville is like Indy, where neither city has much of a national profile yet(it is slowly rising in both, but Louisville doesn't seem to be rising on the national radar yet like Nashville), but slowly people are starting to discover both cities. I do think Louisville has decent restaurants and bars from the little I tried, and MAKE SURE to order a Hot Brown sandwich if you see it on the menu of any restaurant in Louisville. Yes you don't have to go to the Brown Hotel in Louisville to order one, that's just where the name of the sandwich originated. More info:

Cincinnati feels the most like the historic and established city of these 3, and has a lot of good things like its parks(i.e. Eden Park), amenities like museums, it has a local farmers market in the Over the Rhine neighborhood(feel stupid I always forget its name, Findlay Market? may have the name wrong), and a streetcar system was just started in Cincy. I like how their historic train station was saved from demolition 20-30(?) years ago, and now is split between a children's museum and the fact it's once again a train station. Sadly the Amtrak train servicing it(Cardinal) only runs 3 days a week in both directions(seeing 6 trains a week for just that line), and that it doesn't have daily service. The streetcar system was only being tested when I last visited Cincy, but sadly it wasn't in operation yet. I know it's now in operation, though. For music acts, Indy and Cincy probably have the most acts visiting them, followed by Louisville. I won't deny Indy probably has less in terms of architecture, but you can't deny the downtown Indy area and the neighborhoods just to the north that are gentrifying are nice. The city has done a great job of fixing up its downtown, and the neighborhoods to the north are improving. Broad Ripple is nice too, as well. Plus, it has done a good job of building bike trails, including the Indy Cultural Trail. And I think many forget how great the Indianapolis Museum of Art is. That's a MUST VISIT IMO, if you ever go to Indy.

I agree with CentralCarmel totally, it makes me sad in a way a lot of people are not voting Indy since they probably know little about it. I won't deny Indy is a little bit rough around some edges, such as feeling a little sterile. But honestly it's improved a lot in this aspect, and is nowhere near as bad in this issue vs. 10-20 years ago. And of course, Cincy is connected to Covington and Newport since both towns in KY are just across the bridge. Don't forget that Indy has its own farmers market in the downtown, as well. I have no idea what criteria Google is using to determine which cities have Google Fiber installed first, so no comment there. I wouldn't mind if that poster elaborated more, on why Google Fiber is being installed in Louisville?

In the end, I'd probably very narrowly vote Indy, only because I like the restaurants and bars there a tad more. Indy being better in some aspects(i.e. downtown, biking trails), Cincy being better in others(architecture, history, natural feel since it has hills). Indy has progressed on its past deficiencies a lot more, than a lot of people realize. Louisville may be 3rd place to me, but it definitely is a great city too. Maybe someday, more C-D posters will visit that city for themself, and not underrate it?

 
Old 08-05-2017, 07:10 AM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,185,189 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonySegaTendo617 View Post
Don't forget Atlanta. Not just on this board, but on other internet message boards in general. I wouldn't be surprised if some underrate San Jose(that someone mentioned, can't remember who), though as I've never been to San Jose I won't comment.

Back to this thread though, for once I see a thread where I've been to all 3 cities, so I can compare them. It makes me sad Indy is last place in this thread, since to me Indy and Cincy feel neck and neck as decent cities, then Louisville. While Louisville is 3rd out of these cities to me, it definitely still is a decent one to me. They've done a good job revitalizing their downtown, and the neighborhoods are nice too. Louisville is like Indy, where neither city has much of a national profile yet(it is slowly rising in both, but Louisville doesn't seem to be rising on the national radar yet like Nashville), but slowly people are starting to discover both cities. I do think Louisville has decent restaurants and bars from the little I tried, and MAKE SURE to order a Hot Brown sandwich if you see it on the menu of any restaurant in Louisville. Yes you don't have to go to the Brown Hotel in Louisville to order one, that's just where the name of the sandwich originated. More info:

Cincinnati feels the most like the historic and established city of these 3, and has a lot of good things like its parks(i.e. Eden Park), amenities like museums, it has a local farmers market in the Over the Rhine neighborhood(feel stupid I always forget its name, Findlay Market? may have the name wrong), and a streetcar system was just started in Cincy. I like how their historic train station was saved from demolition 20-30(?) years ago, and now is split between a children's museum and the fact it's once again a train station. Sadly the Amtrak train servicing it(Cardinal) only runs 3 days a week in both directions(seeing 6 trains a week for just that line), and that it doesn't have daily service. The streetcar system was only being tested when I last visited Cincy, but sadly it wasn't in operation yet. I know it's now in operation, though. For music acts, Indy and Cincy probably have the most acts visiting them, followed by Louisville. I won't deny Indy probably has less in terms of architecture, but you can't deny the downtown Indy area and the neighborhoods just to the north that are gentrifying are nice. The city has done a great job of fixing up its downtown, and the neighborhoods to the north are improving. Broad Ripple is nice too, as well. Plus, it has done a good job of building bike trails, including the Indy Cultural Trail. And I think many forget how great the Indianapolis Museum of Art is. That's a MUST VISIT IMO, if you ever go to Indy.

I agree with CentralCarmel totally, it makes me sad in a way a lot of people are not voting Indy since they probably know little about it. I won't deny Indy is a little bit rough around some edges, such as feeling a little sterile. But honestly it's improved a lot in this aspect, and is nowhere near as bad in this issue vs. 10-20 years ago. And of course, Cincy is connected to Covington and Newport since both towns in KY are just across the bridge. Don't forget that Indy has its own farmers market in the downtown, as well. I have no idea what criteria Google is using to determine which cities have Google Fiber installed first, so no comment there. I wouldn't mind if that poster elaborated more, on why Google Fiber is being installed in Louisville?

In the end, I'd probably very narrowly vote Indy, only because I like the restaurants and bars there a tad more. Indy being better in some aspects(i.e. downtown, biking trails), Cincy being better in others(architecture, history, natural feel since it has hills). Indy has progressed on its past deficiencies a lot more, than a lot of people realize. Louisville may be 3rd place to me, but it definitely is a great city too. Maybe someday, more C-D posters will visit that city for themself, and not underrate it?

nice post but I feel too many people are swayed by downtowns. Louisvilles neighborhoods are sometimes so hidden you really need a local urban enthusiast to show you the nooks and crannies and how they change with festivals occurring pretty much every weekend in warm months. Also you mentioned NKY for Cincinnati but everyone forgets S. Indiana contains 1/4 of Louisville MSA, sweeping skyline views from bluffs JUST like Cincinnati, and very urban, walkable dt districts.



Here is some info on how Fiber is chosen
https://www.forbes.com/sites/eliseac.../#8a12a794b764
 
Old 08-05-2017, 07:13 AM
 
2,195 posts, read 2,148,016 times
Reputation: 1916
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndieIndy View Post
Cincinnati -> Indianapolis -> Louisville for me.

Cincinnati has a great mix of the old and new. OTR is amazing and I love MLB cities (I believe the Cincinnati Reds are the oldest existing team?) It has a decent music and arts scene with a hilly terrain and a great skyline. The large corporate presence doesn't seem to affect the vibe in Cincy as much as some others with a large # of F500 companies.

Indianapolis is doing great. It has a lot of new construction and rehabs which is gentrifying center township. Its food scene isn't nearly as recognized on the national/regional that Louisville is, but it's lightyears ahead of where it was even just 5 years ago and getting better. It has a diverse economy and a diverse population (compared to Cincinnati and Louisville anyway) and keeps attracting foreign-born. It's a little sterile and corporate but that is changing fast and will continue if the COL stays reasonable.

Louisville is a great city with awesome neighborhoods and a wonderful foodie scene. It's still quite a bit smaller than the other two and that isn't bad, but it's due to explode and i hope that doesn't kill the small indie vibe it has going on. I think the "keep Louisville weird" campaign is pretty ridiculous seeing as how Louisvillians are some of the most down to earth and ordinary people I've ever met.
I think this pretty much sums up my thoughts, as well, though I'm a little less impressed by OTR.
 
Old 08-05-2017, 07:59 AM
 
3,466 posts, read 2,581,100 times
Reputation: 2131
Does Louisville truly have higher up view points and steeper streets also? I'm not saying they don't, I'm just saying I've never seen it in pictures and when I have, it generally hasn't been as steep. The cities I think of as ubiquitous for basically having steepness and streets built in (major) would be Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland and Seattle.

Indianapolis ain't completely flat either as evidenced by the view from Crown Hill Cemetery. Also, they are within quite reasonable distance of the Knobstone Trail which many from around the Midwest do as practice for the actual AT. Not on AT level by any stretch but way more impressive than you would think, probably less than an hour from the city too.
 
Old 08-05-2017, 08:17 AM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,185,189 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Does Louisville truly have higher up view points and steeper streets also? I'm not saying they don't, I'm just saying I've never seen it in pictures and when I have, it generally hasn't been as steep. The cities I think of as ubiquitous for basically having steepness and streets built in (major) would be Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland and Seattle.

Indianapolis ain't completely flat either as evidenced by the view from Crown Hill Cemetery. Also, they are within quite reasonable distance of the Knobstone Trail which many from around the Midwest do as practice for the actual AT. Not on AT level by any stretch but way more impressive than you would think, probably less than an hour from the city too.
Louisville is very hilly! Not quite as hilly as Cincy but hilly nonetheless. Those who think its not show they've only been downtown, likely driving through on 65.


Check 1001 Hull st

8115 N skyline Dr Floyds knobs In

Iroqouis park

https://yelp.to/qTKq/L6yOgdQGmF


Lots of places with very steep hills

Louisville's wealth lives on huge steep hills overlooking the city in Glenview and Mockingbird Calley
 
Old 08-05-2017, 05:07 PM
 
3,466 posts, read 2,581,100 times
Reputation: 2131
Wow. All very nice pictures (esp. the Floyds Knobs one. I suppose if people didn't think it was too creepy, if living/visiting up there, I would probably take an evening drive up Skyline, and perhaps park on the side of the road to watch sunset and see city lights.
 
Old 08-05-2017, 05:23 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,185,189 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Wow. All very nice pictures (esp. the Floyds Knobs one. I suppose if people didn't think it was too creepy, if living/visiting up there, I would probably take an evening drive up Skyline, and perhaps park on the side of the road to watch sunset and see city lights.
I do it all the time. Check out the subdivision called Plum Hill in Floyds Knobs. There is a few vacant lots in the back where you can walk up the lots and have sweeping city views.

Google "Irouqouis Park Lookout" This has the most urban hilly views. Nearby are several great ethnic neighborhoods. Stop for food at Au Chau or Vietnam Kitchen in that area
 
Old 08-05-2017, 09:01 PM
 
2,072 posts, read 1,091,886 times
Reputation: 1360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
I would too, and over Pittsburgh.
Should also add that Cincy outer state burbs vs St.Louis burbs. NOKY smokes the section of Illinois bordering St.Louis.
 
Old 08-05-2017, 09:07 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
1,922 posts, read 1,301,013 times
Reputation: 2102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
I do it all the time. Check out the subdivision called Plum Hill in Floyds Knobs. There is a few vacant lots in the back where you can walk up the lots and have sweeping city views.

Google "Irouqouis Park Lookout" This has the most urban hilly views. Nearby are several great ethnic neighborhoods. Stop for food at Au Chau or Vietnam Kitchen in that area
The Chambord development off of Paoli Pike is another great place for views, although homes are built & developed there now (it was empty a few years back).
 
Old 08-05-2017, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,887 posts, read 4,123,230 times
Reputation: 1870
The fact that Cincy has Kings Island alone... Enough said.
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