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View Poll Results: Louisville vs. Indianapolis vs. Cincinnati
Louisville 23 28.05%
Indianapolis 15 18.29%
Cincinnati 44 53.66%
Voters: 82. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-17-2017, 02:01 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,288,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralCarmel View Post
It's crazy to say that anything in Indy compares well to OTR. Heck, outside of Chicago there's very few neighborhoods in the entire midwest that compare well to it. Hyde Park and Mt Adams are also fine neighborhoods.

The Highlands...please. There's nothing even remotely unique about anything along Bardstown Rd and the adjacent neighborhoods that can't be found in any city with a metro population over one million. It's handy because anything remotely desirable in the city is along that one corridor, but lets not pretend it's something special.

Your boosterism and jingoism reeks. I sincerely hope you're paid to get on here and spout this garbage
OTR ranks as one of the 15 coolest and unique neighborhoods in the nation. Neither Indy or Louisville has anything remotely close to OTR.

 
Old 08-17-2017, 02:57 PM
 
6,296 posts, read 13,179,782 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralCarmel View Post
It's crazy to say that anything in Indy compares well to OTR. Heck, outside of Chicago there's very few neighborhoods in the entire midwest that compare well to it. Hyde Park and Mt Adams are also fine neighborhoods.

The Highlands...please. There's nothing even remotely unique about anything along Bardstown Rd and the adjacent neighborhoods that can't be found in any city with a metro population over one million. It's handy because anything remotely desirable in the city is along that one corridor, but lets not pretend it's something special.

Your boosterism and jingoism reeks. I sincerely hope you're paid to get on here and spout this garbage
Highlands is far from the only thing Louisville has to offer an urbanite. Clearly, you really don't know a thing about the city. One highlands zip is among the hottest in the country:

https://jeffersonpva.ky.gov/2015/08/...-estate-sales/

Broad Ripple pales in comparison to the Highlands. 15 neighborhoods and literally probably 1000 businesses. Where is your objective data that shows that Indy has this in a walkable, historic area outside a 2 mile radius of downtown?

Louisville has so much more to offer than the Highlands. For people in Indy to compare anything in Indy to neighborhoods in Louisville, and especially Over the Rhine in Cincinnati...they really are misinformed. Louisville has nulu, old Louisville, butchertown, Clifton, crescent hill, st Matthews. New Albany and Jeffersonville downtowns have significantly more activity and vibrancy than many neighborhoods triumphed on Indy forums such as Woodruff place.
Indy has such vast expanses of hollowed out city....that's why its not loved on CD.

Indy is pretty much downtown, a couple corridors one mile from downtown, and then vast emptiness until you get to Broad Ripple, which is not even the best counter culture area in the state of Indiana. Indy isn't awful. It's neighborhoods are inferior to Louisville and Cincinnati architecturally, vibrant wise, coffee shop and indie culture wise....you name it. Indy's strength is downtown, pro sports, and good, white collar jobs.

Forget Louisville. Lets compare these neighborhoods you claim Indy has so many of to Louisville's suburb of downtown New Albany, IN, which is effectively an urban core neighborhood:
40 restaurants, 37 places to shop. Outside of downtown Indy and basically downtown neighborhoods such as Fletcher Place which are essentially downtown...where does Indy offer almost 100 urban stores plus countless other business in half a square mile? Please post links to a neighborhood with 80 places to shop that looks urban and walkable. And please don't say Carmel.

And New Albany is only the tip of the iceburg for urban Louisville neighborhoods. If you haven't been to these areas....you will be utterly shocked. They are 360 degrees different than even 3 years ago.

Why don't you quit the personal attacks and jabs at Louisville and come with factual data about Indy?

http://developna.org/

Last edited by Peter1948; 08-17-2017 at 03:23 PM..
 
Old 08-17-2017, 04:24 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,288,128 times
Reputation: 1486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Highlands is far from the only thing Louisville has to offer an urbanite. Clearly, you really don't know a thing about the city. One highlands zip is among the hottest in the country:

https://jeffersonpva.ky.gov/2015/08/...-estate-sales/

Broad Ripple pales in comparison to the Highlands. 15 neighborhoods and literally probably 1000 businesses. Where is your objective data that shows that Indy has this in a walkable, historic area outside a 2 mile radius of downtown?

Louisville has so much more to offer than the Highlands. For people in Indy to compare anything in Indy to neighborhoods in Louisville, and especially Over the Rhine in Cincinnati...they really are misinformed. Louisville has nulu, old Louisville, butchertown, Clifton, crescent hill, st Matthews. New Albany and Jeffersonville downtowns have significantly more activity and vibrancy than many neighborhoods triumphed on Indy forums such as Woodruff place.
Indy has such vast expanses of hollowed out city....that's why its not loved on CD.

Indy is pretty much downtown, a couple corridors one mile from downtown, and then vast emptiness until you get to Broad Ripple, which is not even the best counter culture area in the state of Indiana. Indy isn't awful. It's neighborhoods are inferior to Louisville and Cincinnati architecturally, vibrant wise, coffee shop and indie culture wise....you name it. Indy's strength is downtown, pro sports, and good, white collar jobs.

Forget Louisville. Lets compare these neighborhoods you claim Indy has so many of to Louisville's suburb of downtown New Albany, IN, which is effectively an urban core neighborhood:
40 restaurants, 37 places to shop. Outside of downtown Indy and basically downtown neighborhoods such as Fletcher Place which are essentially downtown...where does Indy offer almost 100 urban stores plus countless other business in half a square mile? Please post links to a neighborhood with 80 places to shop that looks urban and walkable. And please don't say Carmel.

And New Albany is only the tip of the iceburg for urban Louisville neighborhoods. If you haven't been to these areas....you will be utterly shocked. They are 360 degrees different than even 3 years ago.

Why don't you quit the personal attacks and jabs at Louisville and come with factual data about Indy?

Develop New Albany, Floyd County Indiana
What you texted runs contrary to the Cushman and Wakefield's Cool Street Report. The only Louisville neighborhood to make the cut is the Highlands. For what its worth, Indy had two neighborhoods listed.


Cool Streets Report - Cushman & Wakefield
 
Old 08-17-2017, 09:00 PM
 
6,296 posts, read 13,179,782 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
What you texted runs contrary to the Cushman and Wakefield's Cool Street Report. The only Louisville neighborhood to make the cut is the Highlands. For what its worth, Indy had two neighborhoods listed.


Cool Streets Report - Cushman & Wakefield
Come on now. First of all, Highlands is twice the size of those two neighborhoods combined, which are essentially an extension of the mile square. There is simply no neighborhood in Indy outside downtown with the density and number of businesses as the Highlands. The maps I posted above clearly showed that.

This Is the Williamsburg of Your City: A Map of Hip America

I think this ranking is much better. It lists 2 neighborhoods for Louisville (A Williamsburg and Bushwick) but for Indy, only one. Also, it is written by millennials, for millenials. It seems to have less commercial bias

Cushman and Wakefield is not as active in Louisville (other real estate firms are) and thus they promote cities they are active in. Plus Highlands got the red hot hipster stamp while Indy's neighborhoods did not. Do you really believe NYC neighborhoods alone such as Chelsea and Soho are still not considered cool areas, better than Over the Rhine for heaven sake? Delmar Loop? Come on now. Nice area, but by no means top 15 in the US! That Cushman list is a paid advertisement for their vacant retail listings. But, I am sure you know this.

Listen, Indy is NOT a bad town. Sports, vibrant, convention center downtown, decent downtown shopping and vibrancy...but it really falls off fast outside the mile square. Then it picks up nicely where quite honestly Carmel overall is nicer and more successful than any exurb of Cincinnati or Louisville. And this is why it is not beloved on CD. Louisville is far from a CD darling and Cincinnati and Ohio cities get lots of love here. The Ohio and rust belt cities stick together, too.

The gentrification over the last 3-5 years up and down Virginia and Mass Ave are nice in Indy...but every city in America is seeing this! Furthermore, many Indy apartment complexes are generic and sterile like a sunbelt town...unfortunately, Louisville's new apartment boom is also bringing tons of this four story particle board crap here. Heck, Indy developers are responsible for like 3 of them lately!
These streets have absolutely nothing more to offer than east main, market, and washington in Louisville in the Nulu and Butchertown Areas. Like their counterparts in Indy, these neighborhoods are geographically pretty small and dense but rapidly adding new apartments and retail.

Louisville's Butchertown alone has a 300 million single proposal that is very likely to get built as an entertainment and soccer stadium. Like Indy, these areas have seen thousands of apartment and even several hundred hotel units in the pipeline. Unlike Indy, Louisville continues to create new bourbon tourist attractions.

And then, there are areas in Louisville that Indy has absolutely zero answer for such as Clifton and Crescent Hill. is it more impressive to walk along a canal walk or a mile wide bridge into a very cute downtown with live events every weekend in the summer like Jeffersonville, IN? There is this myth on CD among some Indy and regional posters that Louisville is the Highlands and thats it. Boy are these people in for a surprise to see the boom going on here if they ever actually enter into neighborhoods, including in S. Indiana.

Last edited by Peter1948; 08-17-2017 at 09:10 PM..
 
Old 08-18-2017, 08:00 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,288,128 times
Reputation: 1486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Come on now. First of all, Highlands is twice the size of those two neighborhoods combined, which are essentially an extension of the mile square. There is simply no neighborhood in Indy outside downtown with the density and number of businesses as the Highlands. The maps I posted above clearly showed that.

This Is the Williamsburg of Your City: A Map of Hip America

I think this ranking is much better. It lists 2 neighborhoods for Louisville (A Williamsburg and Bushwick) but for Indy, only one. Also, it is written by millennials, for millenials. It seems to have less commercial bias

Cushman and Wakefield is not as active in Louisville (other real estate firms are) and thus they promote cities they are active in. Plus Highlands got the red hot hipster stamp while Indy's neighborhoods did not. Do you really believe NYC neighborhoods alone such as Chelsea and Soho are still not considered cool areas, better than Over the Rhine for heaven sake? Delmar Loop? Come on now. Nice area, but by no means top 15 in the US! That Cushman list is a paid advertisement for their vacant retail listings. But, I am sure you know this.

Listen, Indy is NOT a bad town. Sports, vibrant, convention center downtown, decent downtown shopping and vibrancy...but it really falls off fast outside the mile square. Then it picks up nicely where quite honestly Carmel overall is nicer and more successful than any exurb of Cincinnati or Louisville. And this is why it is not beloved on CD. Louisville is far from a CD darling and Cincinnati and Ohio cities get lots of love here. The Ohio and rust belt cities stick together, too.

The gentrification over the last 3-5 years up and down Virginia and Mass Ave are nice in Indy...but every city in America is seeing this! Furthermore, many Indy apartment complexes are generic and sterile like a sunbelt town...unfortunately, Louisville's new apartment boom is also bringing tons of this four story particle board crap here. Heck, Indy developers are responsible for like 3 of them lately!
These streets have absolutely nothing more to offer than east main, market, and washington in Louisville in the Nulu and Butchertown Areas. Like their counterparts in Indy, these neighborhoods are geographically pretty small and dense but rapidly adding new apartments and retail.

Louisville's Butchertown alone has a 300 million single proposal that is very likely to get built as an entertainment and soccer stadium. Like Indy, these areas have seen thousands of apartment and even several hundred hotel units in the pipeline. Unlike Indy, Louisville continues to create new bourbon tourist attractions.

And then, there are areas in Louisville that Indy has absolutely zero answer for such as Clifton and Crescent Hill. is it more impressive to walk along a canal walk or a mile wide bridge into a very cute downtown with live events every weekend in the summer like Jeffersonville, IN? There is this myth on CD among some Indy and regional posters that Louisville is the Highlands and thats it. Boy are these people in for a surprise to see the boom going on here if they ever actually enter into neighborhoods, including in S. Indiana.

Will this boom that you are talking about result in more millennials flocking to Louisville? For a city that you tout as being cool and hip it has an old population. The median age is 37.
 
Old 08-18-2017, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Montco PA
696 posts, read 1,204,440 times
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If not for the crazy Kentucky wage taxes I would choose Louisville. Cincy vs Indy is tough. Better transit? Better value for the money? Less QOL issues?
 
Old 08-18-2017, 08:17 PM
 
6,296 posts, read 13,179,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
Will this boom that you are talking about result in more millennials flocking to Louisville? For a city that you tout as being cool and hip it has an old population. The median age is 37.
And what is Indy like 35 or 36? How in the heck is that any different?

Also Louisville is now a big retirement area as many rankings have made it top 5. Louisville's aging elderly shifts the median age towards older.
However, as the above poster astutely noticed, KY's income tax and anti business environment, plus negative state stereotypes hold Louisville back the most of anything.

In the last 10 years, the rise of "bourbonism", a national love of historic rehabs (of which Louisville has thousands), and massive job growth have been a huge boon to Louisville.

Louisville is absolutely booming in real estate, commercial and residential.

Where it holds steady is population estimates. We will see if they hold up. Indy is growing faster than Louisville, and Louisville is growing substantially faster than Cincinnati....but I wouldn't be surprised if the 2020 census gives us a more accurate picture. Also keep in mind Louisville's MSA is TINY in geographic reach. KY counties are the smallest in the nation, and furthermore, several other metros eat into what would be Louisville's reach. If Louisville's MSA had the same geographic area as Indy, its MSA would be more like 1.6 million.

Louisville is on list after list like this:

https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nat...ity-pittsburgh

For you to say its not like this, it shows you haven't even spent a weekend driving and biking around the city neighborhoods of Louisville any time recently...its uncanny how many hipster millennial types one sees. the place that would shock you the most is New Albany, IN. Its gentrifying so much that one of Indy's largest apartment developers built a massive complex in its urban core. Louisville is literally a massive construction zone right now.

http://flco.com/news-articles/wave-l...wn-new-albany/

https://insiderlouisville.com/busine...-young-people/


Just like the media has bias to both left and right, alot of these population sites are simply using flawed data.
Listen, Louisville is no Nashville or Austin when it comes to population, and certainly not development, but it has a substantially impressive amount of stuff going on. Even with all the investment in Cincinnati, no one in this region has 10 billion in projects going on.

If you have in your head old, uneducated, blue collar for Louisville....that's simply not the Louisville of 2017. There is certainly a large element of that there, but its becoming so much more. It's fun to watch as long as too many people don't overrun the place
 
Old 08-19-2017, 05:29 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,288,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
And what is Indy like 35 or 36? How in the heck is that any different?

Also Louisville is now a big retirement area as many rankings have made it top 5. Louisville's aging elderly shifts the median age towards older.
However, as the above poster astutely noticed, KY's income tax and anti business environment, plus negative state stereotypes hold Louisville back the most of anything.

In the last 10 years, the rise of "bourbonism", a national love of historic rehabs (of which Louisville has thousands), and massive job growth have been a huge boon to Louisville.

Louisville is absolutely booming in real estate, commercial and residential.

Where it holds steady is population estimates. We will see if they hold up. Indy is growing faster than Louisville, and Louisville is growing substantially faster than Cincinnati....but I wouldn't be surprised if the 2020 census gives us a more accurate picture. Also keep in mind Louisville's MSA is TINY in geographic reach. KY counties are the smallest in the nation, and furthermore, several other metros eat into what would be Louisville's reach. If Louisville's MSA had the same geographic area as Indy, its MSA would be more like 1.6 million.

Louisville is on list after list like this:

https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nat...ity-pittsburgh

For you to say its not like this, it shows you haven't even spent a weekend driving and biking around the city neighborhoods of Louisville any time recently...its uncanny how many hipster millennial types one sees. the place that would shock you the most is New Albany, IN. Its gentrifying so much that one of Indy's largest apartment developers built a massive complex in its urban core. Louisville is literally a massive construction zone right now.

WAVE (Louisville): Luxury apartments hope to bring new life to downtown New Albany - Flaherty & Collins Properties

https://insiderlouisville.com/busine...-young-people/


Just like the media has bias to both left and right, alot of these population sites are simply using flawed data.
Listen, Louisville is no Nashville or Austin when it comes to population, and certainly not development, but it has a substantially impressive amount of stuff going on. Even with all the investment in Cincinnati, no one in this region has 10 billion in projects going on.

If you have in your head old, uneducated, blue collar for Louisville....that's simply not the Louisville of 2017. There is certainly a large element of that there, but its becoming so much more. It's fun to watch as long as too many people don't overrun the place
Indy's median age population is 33.7 which is below the national average.
 
Old 08-20-2017, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
20,958 posts, read 15,275,811 times
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I think most of us would agree that Indy has superior suburbs why Louisville has a much cooler urban core.
 
Old 08-20-2017, 02:53 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,288,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Come on now. First of all, Highlands is twice the size of those two neighborhoods combined, which are essentially an extension of the mile square. There is simply no neighborhood in Indy outside downtown with the density and number of businesses as the Highlands. The maps I posted above clearly showed that.
The Highland isn't twice the size of the Massachusetts Avenue Arts District and Fountain Square/Virginia Avenue combined. Mass Avenue total 2 mile population radius is 50,620 while Fountain Square/Virginia Ave is 51,701. The Highlands is 55,499. What you posted fabricated story and easily proven to be false.
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