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View Poll Results: Which do you prefer?
Dallas Summers 107 50.23%
Chicago Winters 106 49.77%
Voters: 213. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-12-2017, 03:39 PM
 
1,519 posts, read 986,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Over the course of the winter I doubt most people in Chicagoland spend any more time scraping ice off their cars than we do waiting for ours to cool off. I most people park in their garage just like down here anyway.

As for the roads, yeah, ice and snow are bad for the roads, but so is driving pickup trucks. The reason the roads up there are usually worse is less due to weather and more due to age and funding. As our infrastructure ages (as I see in some parts of the Metroplex they already have) they will fall apart as well. I would be willing to bet as our roads age they will get significantly worse as the funds to repair them are totally insufficient for the amount of roads we have built, but that is a different discussion.

In the end, the roads argument isn't super relevant to picking between Dallas or Chicago weather, is it? No. it isn't.
I don't know people who wait for their cars to cool off, even for people who park outside of garages (which is most people I know). I've never heard of their cars taking damage from not waiting them to cool off and I certainly never had issue with it. Thing is, you generally don't have to wait for a car to cool down (or heat up), at least from my experience with cars in Dallas, but taking some ice and snow off is a necessity. So, yeah, I do think people on average in places like Chicago spend more time dealing with ice than people in DFW spend waiting for their cars to cool off.

Tangent, I actually really doubted what you said about most people putting their cars in garages, and the searches I did seem to indicate that that is not correct. Even the people I know who have cars in their garages have one or two parked on the streets as well.

The only part of the Metroplex I see roads aging and in bad condition is within Dallas itself. Maybe Denton, but that city has recently gotten very serious about fixing up roads and I, as someone who drives there often, do believe that there has been a lot of improvement. Even the inner ring suburbs that are barely growing (or apparently even are projected to have lost people, according to latest estimates) don't have bad roads when I travel through them.

About pickup trucks being bad for roads, where are you getting that? I'm not saying you are wrong, but it isn't anything I've heard of before and articles aren't coming up when I search Google to read about it, aside from one about eighteen wheelers, but I got the feel that you were referring to something else by pickup trucks. And even then, that same source keeps mentioned weather as another major cause of road deterioration. If you search for snow/ice road damage, many more results pop up, including ones about ice and snow causing damage and ones about the salt doing damage. From that (and all the Northerns I have met who have brought up snow as a major factoring damaging roads), I get a sense that one is much more detrimental to streets than the other. Feel free to post your sources, though, if you want to.

I never implied we have good weather, but you shouldn't be acting like your opinion is the definite source on what places have good and bad weather. I hate DFW's weather, and I have said that numerous times on these forums, especially when people, usually again Northerners, pull out the bull that people only move to Dallas because of the weather (cause, yeah, if I wanted good weather, I would move to Dallas, of all places/s). but I think it is better than that of the vast majority of cities in the nation. Dallas is very humid for me, so anything directly South or East of Dallas is unbearable, California and the Southwest is too sunny and dry, and the Northeast and Midwest gets too cold (while still being able to have horrible summers) and the sun goes down very early. I like temperate weather with minimal snow and a lot of rain, preferably thunderstorms, but if I had to pick, I would say Seattle has the best weather, and, in my opinion, the only good weather among the major US cities, despite the same issue with the sun setting early (aside from their summers, which I don't dislike too much). Don't sit there and act like all I am doing is praising the weather in DFW. Also, you obviously know nothing. In my neighborhood, the leaves on trees change colors and I think it is nice, with red, orange, brown, some yellow every autumn. Even over the last few years which were a bit on the mild side. I don't even think about it, because to me it seems like a common thing; if it was something that I only ever saw in my neighborhood, or a handful of others, I would have taken note by now. Regardless, on the topic of "no color," you seem to be factually incorrect, for the second time, at least.

Anyhow, I guess I shouldn't be surprised that you think your own opinion is objective truth. Just look at how you ended this point: "oh, in my opinion the 'roads argument' doesn't matter,an so I'm going to say it isn't super relevant as if it is a fact." And, still, no apology for the incorrect assumption you, with no evidence, made earlier about me (that I think roads are impassible in the North during winter).
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Old 08-12-2017, 05:35 PM
 
2,414 posts, read 1,322,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post



Plenty can grow in the hottest of Dallas summers, with irrigation needed for any dry spells. What can be grown outdoors in the middle of a cold Chicago winter?

.
No vegetable can grow in Dallas winter anyway. And it is as barren and brown as the North in the winter.
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Old 08-12-2017, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,887 posts, read 4,122,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
No vegetable can grow in Dallas winter anyway. And it is as barren and brown as the North in the winter.
Not true. There are many varieties of greenery and flowers in Dallas in the Winter.

Live Oaks and other trees and shrubs don't lose their leaves. Many areas, especially in the Central Dallas are very green in the Winter.
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:09 PM
 
61 posts, read 31,979 times
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Chicago winters. Because people still get out and frolick the bars and nightlife and also hockey.

Chicago is just cold. I'll take that over cities like Buffalo that get 5x the amount of snow. That's a winter.
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 979,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OpinionatedOne View Post
Chicago winters. Because people still get out and frolick the bars and nightlife and also hockey.

Chicago is just cold. I'll take that over cities like Buffalo that get 5x the amount of snow. That's a winter.
I rather have a lot of snow over just cold but hey that is just me
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:16 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,044,203 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
No vegetable can grow in Dallas winter anyway.
First of all, the comparison is between Dallas summers and Chicago winters. So Dallas winters are irrelevant here.

But anyways, the duration of cold spells in Dallas are brief to the point that the ground remains relatively warm, helping to keep the roots alive. So there are certainly selections of crops that can be grown outdoors in a Dallas winter. The only vegetables grown in a Northern winter are in the greenhouse:
https://www.dmagazine.com/publicatio...and-vegetables

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
And it is as barren and brown as the North in the winter.
Oh wow, look at all that brown barrenness at Dallas during winter, exactly like the North. No cherry picking either, I just selected a random spot:
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:24 PM
 
2,311 posts, read 1,068,675 times
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^^^^
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Oh wow, look at all that brown barrenness in Dallas during winter. It looks just like the North:
Honestly, you found a street-view exception in the tree varieties..... maybe oak? That did not lose leaves. Other trees are bare in the street-view and grass brownish gray just as in the north. I could post some evergreens from spruce trees to rhododendrons. Then say ..... see some green even in winters up north . Some grasses are hardier then others keeping hints of green.

But far less times snow is on the ground over days in Dallas for sure and few sub-freezing days at all. You get that.
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Old 08-12-2017, 08:08 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,044,203 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Honestly, you found a street-view exception in the tree varieties..... maybe oak? That did not lose leaves. Other trees are bare in the street-view and grass brownish gray just as in the north. I could post some evergreens from spruce trees to rhododendrons. Then say ..... see some green even in winters up north . Some grasses are hardier then others keeping hints of green.

But far less times snow is on the ground over days in Dallas for sure and few sub-freezing days at all. You get that.
That view is hardly an exception. Heck, Dallas has gardens that look like this:

Tony

Show me ANYWHERE in the North that can match, and then we can talk. I'll even let you use the Northeast (which is milder than the Midwest where Chicago is). I'll wait.
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Old 08-12-2017, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,276 posts, read 928,196 times
Reputation: 4974
Chicago winters.

You can wear layers for warmth and move around to stay warm.

When it's Dallas-summer hot, you can only take off so many layers to cool down

Spent some time in Dallas during the summer, and their summer weather is brutal. It made Louisville's look like a lightweight!
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Old 08-12-2017, 09:09 PM
 
2,414 posts, read 1,322,919 times
Reputation: 1912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
First of all, the comparison is between Dallas summers and Chicago winters. So Dallas winters are irrelevant here.

But anyways, the duration of cold spells in Dallas are brief to the point that the ground remains relatively warm, helping to keep the roots alive. So there are certainly selections of crops that can be grown outdoors in a Dallas winter. The only vegetables grown in a Northern winter are in the greenhouse:
https://www.dmagazine.com/publicatio...and-vegetables



Oh wow, look at all that brown barrenness at Dallas during winter, exactly like the North. No cherry picking either, I just selected a random spot:
Live oak is the tree in Dallas that did not loose leaf. The other one is Southern Magnolia but it is much rarer. Without those there, it is as barren as the north.

Those palm sstill need winter protection in Dallas. There is a house in Highland Park with lots of those palms and they got wrapped up in the winter. The bamboo can also survive in the East coast around DC and coastal Virginia as well
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