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View Poll Results: Which do you prefer?
Dallas Summers 107 50.23%
Chicago Winters 106 49.77%
Voters: 213. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-12-2017, 10:22 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,072,914 times
Reputation: 1386

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
Live oak is the tree in Dallas that did not loose leaf. The other one is Southern Magnolia but it is much rarer. Without those there, it is as barren as the north.

Those palm sstill need winter protection in Dallas. There is a house in Highland Park with lots of those palms and they got wrapped up in the winter. The bamboo can also survive in the East coast around DC and coastal Virginia as well
I'm still waiting on a picture from an area up North that can compare to what I showed for Dallas. Until then, none of your babbling matters.

Oh and DC and coastal Virginia are in the South.
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Old 08-12-2017, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,900 posts, read 4,153,483 times
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There's so many live oaks in certain neighborhoods in Dallas, you don't even notice a change in the seasons at all other than the temperature change. Some other areas do have more deciduous trees that begin to change color around Thanksgiving, but they start budding again in mid to late February. The "brown" season here in Dallas is around 2 months out of the year.
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:11 AM
 
77 posts, read 33,642 times
Reputation: 105
I live in Miami Beach which has worse (longer, more humid, hotter mornings) summers than Dallas.

If some people are hibernating you wouldn't be able to tell. Ocean Dr is packed, the beaches are packed. I tried to go kayaking in Oleta state park but left because of the long lines of people renting equipment. Everything is so packed I WISH people were hibernating indoors.

I lived in SE Michigan for 16 years. I've seen "mild" winters and extreme winters. I'm not going to tell people what they should prefer but I'd gladly run a marathon (I jog every morning here for about 5 miles) in the midday sun in August in Miami than January back in Michigan. In fact when I lived there, I'd generally begin going to a indoor gym sometime in November. And people definitely hibernated there. Comparing Chicago to Dallas is unfair since Chicago is a "walking" city. Compare it to suburban Detroit.
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:12 AM
 
2,438 posts, read 1,364,052 times
Reputation: 1945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
I'm still waiting on a picture from an area up North that can compare to what I showed for Dallas. Until then, none of your babbling matters.

Oh and DC and coastal Virginia are in the South.
See for yourself

DC Tropics: Testing the limits: 2015 winners

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Old 08-13-2017, 03:21 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,051 posts, read 891,920 times
Reputation: 2448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
I don't know people who wait for their cars to cool off, even for people who park outside of garages (which is most people I know). I've never heard of their cars taking damage from not waiting them to cool off and I certainly never had issue with it. Thing is, you generally don't have to wait for a car to cool down (or heat up), at least from my experience with cars in Dallas, but taking some ice and snow off is a necessity. So, yeah, I do think people on average in places like Chicago spend more time dealing with ice than people in DFW spend waiting for their cars to cool off.

I don't mean people sit around waiting for their car to cool off, but the first 5 or so min after you get into a car here from about June till October are pretty uncomfortable. I probably spend more time in Dallas sweating through my work cloths every time I go back to a hot car after a meeting than I would if I had to scrape off a little ice or snow some days.

Tangent, I actually really doubted what you said about most people putting their cars in garages, and the searches I did seem to indicate that that is not correct. Even the people I know who have cars in their garages have one or two parked on the streets as well.

I said I suspected, but if I was wrong, I was wrong.

The only part of the Metroplex I see roads aging and in bad condition is within Dallas itself. Maybe Denton, but that city has recently gotten very serious about fixing up roads and I, as someone who drives there often, do believe that there has been a lot of improvement. Even the inner ring suburbs that are barely growing (or apparently even are projected to have lost people, according to latest estimates) don't have bad roads when I travel through them.

About pickup trucks being bad for roads, where are you getting that? I'm not saying you are wrong, but it isn't anything I've heard of before and articles aren't coming up when I search Google to read about it, aside from one about eighteen wheelers, but I got the feel that you were referring to something else by pickup trucks. And even then, that same source keeps mentioned weather as another major cause of road deterioration. If you search for snow/ice road damage, many more results pop up, including ones about ice and snow causing damage and ones about the salt doing damage. From that (and all the Northerns I have met who have brought up snow as a major factoring damaging roads), I get a sense that one is much more detrimental to streets than the other. Feel free to post your sources, though, if you want to.

I never said ice and snow were good for roads. I grew up in a northern state so I know they are not. What I was trying to explain to you is that the quality of the Dallas or Chicago roads is more of a function of age and funding than it is of weather. All things created equal yeah our roads will hold up better in the long run, sure, but if you look at how roads are funded and look at the numbers DFW is not going to be able to maintain our network which is much more concerning than ice or snow. This really isn't a topic that related to the weather.



More than happy to quote my source regarding trucks: https://streets.mn/2016/07/07/chart-...damage-levels/

I never implied we have good weather, but you shouldn't be acting like your opinion is the definite source on what places have good and bad weather. I hate DFW's weather, and I have said that numerous times on these forums, especially when people, usually again Northerners, pull out the bull that people only move to Dallas because of the weather (cause, yeah, if I wanted good weather, I would move to Dallas, of all places/s). but I think it is better than that of the vast majority of cities in the nation. Dallas is very humid for me, so anything directly South or East of Dallas is unbearable, California and the Southwest is too sunny and dry, and the Northeast and Midwest gets too cold (while still being able to have horrible summers) and the sun goes down very early. I like temperate weather with minimal snow and a lot of rain, preferably thunderstorms, but if I had to pick, I would say Seattle has the best weather, and, in my opinion, the only good weather among the major US cities, despite the same issue with the sun setting early (aside from their summers, which I don't dislike too much). Don't sit there and act like all I am doing is praising the weather in DFW. Also, you obviously know nothing. In my neighborhood, the leaves on trees change colors and I think it is nice, with red, orange, brown, some yellow every autumn. Even over the last few years which were a bit on the mild side. I don't even think about it, because to me it seems like a common thing; if it was something that I only ever saw in my neighborhood, or a handful of others, I would have taken note by now. Regardless, on the topic of "no color," you seem to be factually incorrect, for the second time, at least.

"no color" is clearly a hyperbole, although not a very big one. Anyone who has experience with real fall color would know what I'm talking about.

Anyhow, I guess I shouldn't be surprised that you think your own opinion is objective truth. Just look at how you ended this point: "oh, in my opinion the 'roads argument' doesn't matter,an so I'm going to say it isn't super relevant as if it is a fact." And, still, no apology for the incorrect assumption you, with no evidence, made earlier about me (that I think roads are impassible in the North during winter).
I never claimed objective truth, weather is a personal opinion. And yeah, I do think the roads argument is pretty irrelevant to the conversation about weather you might as well bring up common foundation issues in North Texas at that point.

My point about "impassible roads" was hyperbole in response to your previous post that I thought over emphasized the inconvenience of getting around in the winter.

Sorry if that offended you so badly.
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:39 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,051 posts, read 891,920 times
Reputation: 2448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
It's more than just "putting on a jacket", it's putting on multiple layers of them (enough to protect from the cold), and making sure those layers are air tight (so as to not have a crevice where cold air can seep in). No matter how fast you can do it, it still takes more effort, and more time than just a simple t-shirt and shorts during summer.

We are talking about Dallas summers vs Chicago winters, so how cold it gets in Dallas is irrelevant. Fact is, the wardrobe for a Dallas summer is less expensive than that for a Chicago winter: winter coats cost more than simple t-shirts, end of story.

Some people are wasteful with A/C, no doubt, but there is less use of it in a Dallas summer than there is of Heat in a Chicago winter (whether from central systems or a fire place).

Plenty can grow in the hottest of Dallas summers, with irrigation needed for any dry spells. What can be grown outdoors in the middle of a cold Chicago winter?

And thanks for proving my point about Chicago winters; the people outside all huddle up by whatever heat source is present, and that's even in the afternoon when temps are warmest. There is no way to relaxed, fun leisure where one can easily have a good time. A Dallas summer is much easier for hanging out at the restaurant patio, and having a cool beer with friends; the heat of the day is avoided by moving all activities to night.
Honest question: what do you do that only requires you to wear shorts and a T shirt? Sure, if all you ever wear are T Shirts and shorts then yeah, it probably is a lot quicker and cheaper to dress in Dallas than Chicago.

Most people don't just wear shorts and Tshirts all the time. I wish I could.

Again, putting on a jacket isn't some crazy feat of engineering. You really can just sort of throw it on unless you are spending an extended period outside in which case it maybe takes an extra 30 seconds?

As for people keeping warm in Chicago winters, yeah, its basically the same concept you will find here in the summer. People will dress to try to be as comfortable as possible and then find climate controlled environments to warm up or cool off. Go out to the bars in the summer in Dallas an you will find people doing their best to stay cool with AC. "I'm so hot, lets go inside" is a pretty common phrase you hear people say as you push through the sweaty masses to get inside a bar this time of year.
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Old 08-13-2017, 07:20 AM
 
77 posts, read 33,642 times
Reputation: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
Do people read each other on CD or just post away?
In the post you "responded" to, he clearly stated D.C. doesn't count as it's part of the coastal South. Yet you posted pics from D.C. anyways ....
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:46 AM
 
1,457 posts, read 711,540 times
Reputation: 1980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
That view is hardly an exception. Heck, Dallas has gardens that look like this:

Tony

Show me ANYWHERE in the North that can match, and then we can talk. I'll even let you use the Northeast (which is milder than the Midwest where Chicago is). I'll wait.
Is this supposed to be pretty?
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:55 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,072,914 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Honest question: what do you do that only requires you to wear shorts and a T shirt? Sure, if all you ever wear are T Shirts and shorts then yeah, it probably is a lot quicker and cheaper to dress in Dallas than Chicago.

Most people don't just wear shorts and Tshirts all the time. I wish I could.
Of course such casual wear isn't worn all the time, but it represents the type of clothing suited for a Dallas summer. And the garments aren't expensive like winter coats.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Again, putting on a jacket isn't some crazy feat of engineering. You really can just sort of throw it on unless you are spending an extended period outside in which case it maybe takes an extra 30 seconds?
Sure, just that you'll end up having your inner skin exposed to the biting cold, thanks to the frigid air seeping through openings in the sleeves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
As for people keeping warm in Chicago winters, yeah, its basically the same concept you will find here in the summer. People will dress to try to be as comfortable as possible and then find climate controlled environments to warm up or cool off. Go out to the bars in the summer in Dallas an you will find people doing their best to stay cool with AC. "I'm so hot, lets go inside" is a pretty common phrase you hear people say as you push through the sweaty masses to get inside a bar this time of year.
And yet there is still more life and leisure outdoors in Dallas summers than in Chicago winters.

Let's put it this way: plenty of outdoor concerts in a Dallas summer, not nearly as many in a Chicago winter.
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,072,914 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Is this supposed to be pretty?
You think anywhere up North has a garden that can match? If yes, then show me; I'll be waiting.
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