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View Poll Results: Region with the most robust Tier III & IV cities?
Northeast 9 15.25%
Southeast 17 28.81%
Midwest 27 45.76%
Southwest 1 1.69%
West 5 8.47%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-23-2017, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
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I would also say that the 4-million metros are usually more similar to the 6-million metros in terms of subjective factors like "urban feel," "pace," "energy," etc., than they are to the 2-million metros. But, as you say, there's often not a lot of difference between a 2-million metro and a 4-million, either.
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:48 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tribecavsbrowns View Post
I assume Chicago is Tier 1, so it's odd to me to think of the Twin Cities as Tier 3. Makes me wonder what the hell Tier 2 is. Twin Cities have basically everything any major American metro area has.
I'd say tier's 1 and 2 both would have to be broken down into a/b categories. Detroit and Minneapolis would both make it into Tier 2-B status IMO. Both have all four major sports, pretty sizable urban-suburban population, huge malls, solid airports, and in the case of Detroit shares the largest international border of the US. Tier 3 cities are your Cincinnati's, Cleveland's, Indy's, Pittsburgh's of the Midwest.
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Old 08-23-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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IMO it would go something like this with regards to "tiers", which remember is not solely dependent on total population of a city/metro, but definitely is relevant.

Tier 1a

New York
Los Angeles



Tier 1b

Chicago (debated this as 1a)
San Francisco
Washington DC

Tier 2a (much closer to tier 1b, than tier 1b is to tier 1a)

Boston (debated this as 1b)
Houston
Dallas
Philadelphia
Miami
Atlanta

Tier 2b

Seattle
Phoenix
Detroit
Minneapolis
Denver (not sure if this is tier 3)

Tier 3 (no order just naming them)

Baltimore (Northeast)
Orlando (Southeast)
Charlotte (Southeast)
Portland (West)
Pittsburgh (Northeast)
Cleveland (Midwest)
Cincinnati (Midwest)
Columbus (Midwest)
Indianapolis (Midwest)
St Louis (Midwest)

Feel free to break tier 3 down into A and B as you may, but with relation to this thread i have highlighted the tier 3's.

The question would be about tier IV. The post made earlier about all the tier IV cities in the Northeast region makes a lot of sense.

Last edited by the resident09; 08-23-2017 at 10:15 AM..
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Old 08-23-2017, 11:50 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ARrocket View Post
Well, the Midwest has cities like Minneapolis - Saint Paul, Saint Louis, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati, so I don't think any other region can compare.
San Antonio, Richmond, Nashville, Austin, Memphis, Birmingham, Tampa, Orlando, New Orleans, Raleigh, Louisville? And tier 4's I'd say it's Charleston, Savannah, Huntsville, Fort Worth, Greenville, Norfolk, Asheville and etc.
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Old 08-23-2017, 12:46 PM
 
Location: East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
San Antonio, Richmond, Nashville, Austin, Memphis, Birmingham, Tampa, Orlando, New Orleans, Raleigh, Louisville? And tier 4's I'd say it's Charleston, Savannah, Huntsville, Fort Worth, Greenville, Norfolk, Asheville and etc.
I guess most people would consider San Antonio and Tampa to be in two separate regions, but you're right, there are a lot there too.
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Old 08-23-2017, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
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Here's a list of cities between 500k and 1 million in population, which in my opinion would define Tier 3/4, ordered into my interpretation of their region:

Midwest
Columbus
Indianapolis
Detroit
Milwaukee

Southeast
Jacksonville
Charlotte
Nashville
Louisville

Northeast
Washington
Boston

Southwest
Fort Worth
Denver
El Paso
Oklahoma City
Las Vegas
Austin
Albuquerque
Tucson

West
Fresno
San Francisco
Seattle
Portland

Note: Atlanta, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and Cincy, although frequently cited in this group, are actually smaller than 500k. To include Pittsburgh by this measure we'd also have to include places like Stockton and Anchorage.

If we instead go by Metros of 1.5 to 4.0 Million (and this makes more sense to me) we'd have:

Midwest
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
St. Louis, MO-IL
Pittsburgh, PA
Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN
Kansas City, MO-KS
Cleveland-Elyria, OH
Columbus, OH
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI

Southeast
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC
Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN

Northeast
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD
Providence-Warwick, RI-MA

Southwest
San Diego-Carlsbad, CA
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX
Austin-Round Rock, TX
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV

West
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA
Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA

Note: Metro Detroit and Phoenix Metro are larger than 4 million, making them "Tier 2", in my opinion

If we go by "City" I would have to say the West has the best resume. Tough to beat a lineup that includes San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland. If we go by "Metro" (which is what is typically meant in these types of things) I think the Midwest is the clear winner. You're talking about the stereotypical Heartland of America, the blue-collar middle class, some truly solid places which make up home to ~25% of the NFL teams there in those Tier 3/4 Midwestern Metros.
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Old 08-23-2017, 01:03 PM
 
52,684 posts, read 75,557,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
Here's a list of cities between 500k and 1 million in population, which in my opinion would define Tier 3/4, ordered into my interpretation of their region:

Midwest
Columbus
Indianapolis
Detroit
Milwaukee

Southeast
Jacksonville
Charlotte
Nashville
Louisville

Northeast
Washington
Boston

Southwest
Fort Worth
Denver
El Paso
Oklahoma City
Las Vegas
Austin
Albuquerque
Tucson

West
Fresno
San Francisco
Seattle
Portland

Note: Atlanta, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and Cincy, although frequently cited in this group, are actually smaller than 500k. To include Pittsburgh by this measure we'd also have to include places like Stockton and Anchorage.

If we instead go by Metros of 1.5 to 4.0 Million (and this makes more sense to me) we'd have:

Midwest
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
St. Louis, MO-IL
Pittsburgh, PA
Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN
Kansas City, MO-KS
Cleveland-Elyria, OH
Columbus, OH
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI

Southeast
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC
Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN

Northeast
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD
Providence-Warwick, RI-MA

Southwest
San Diego-Carlsbad, CA
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX
Austin-Round Rock, TX
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV

West
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA
Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA

Note: Metro Detroit and Phoenix Metro are larger than 4 million, making them "Tier 2", in my opinion

If we go by "City" I would have to say the West has the best resume. Tough to beat a lineup that includes San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland. If we go by "Metro" (which is what is typically meant in these types of things) I think the Midwest is the clear winner. You're talking about the stereotypical Heartland of America, the blue-collar middle class, some truly solid places which make up home to ~25% of the NFL teams there in those Tier 3/4 Midwestern Metros.
What about metros between 500k-1.5 million? Those metros would likely be in that Tier 3/4.
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Old 08-23-2017, 01:27 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ARrocket View Post
I guess most people would consider San Antonio and Tampa to be in two separate regions, but you're right, there are a lot there too.
You know what, I didn't catch that the poll said Southeast instead of South; if we're going by that then of course the Midwest is larger and the better choice, it's a much larger region. Odd to have the Southwest AND West in the polls though...
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Old 08-23-2017, 01:42 PM
 
1,324 posts, read 678,346 times
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Wow I guess I'm too easy on these cities. I was considering tiers 3 and 4 to be much smaller. I was just thinking if you have a professional sports team your city must be at least tier 2. Now where does the AA baseball affiliate of your local team play that's tier 3 or 4.
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Old 08-23-2017, 02:03 PM
 
27,767 posts, read 24,794,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie View Post
Here's a list of cities between 500k and 1 million in population, which in my opinion would define Tier 3/4, ordered into my interpretation of their region:

Midwest
Columbus
Indianapolis
Detroit
Milwaukee

Southeast
Jacksonville
Charlotte
Nashville
Louisville

Northeast
Washington
Boston

Southwest
Fort Worth
Denver
El Paso
Oklahoma City
Las Vegas
Austin
Albuquerque
Tucson

West
Fresno
San Francisco
Seattle
Portland

Note: Atlanta, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and Cincy, although frequently cited in this group, are actually smaller than 500k. To include Pittsburgh by this measure we'd also have to include places like Stockton and Anchorage.

If we instead go by Metros of 1.5 to 4.0 Million (and this makes more sense to me) we'd have:

Midwest
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
St. Louis, MO-IL
Pittsburgh, PA
Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN
Kansas City, MO-KS
Cleveland-Elyria, OH
Columbus, OH
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI

Southeast
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC
Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN

Northeast
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD
Providence-Warwick, RI-MA

Southwest
San Diego-Carlsbad, CA
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX
Austin-Round Rock, TX
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV

West
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA
Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA

Note: Metro Detroit and Phoenix Metro are larger than 4 million, making them "Tier 2", in my opinion

If we go by "City" I would have to say the West has the best resume. Tough to beat a lineup that includes San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland. If we go by "Metro" (which is what is typically meant in these types of things) I think the Midwest is the clear winner. You're talking about the stereotypical Heartland of America, the blue-collar middle class, some truly solid places which make up home to ~25% of the NFL teams there in those Tier 3/4 Midwestern Metros.
I agree that metro (MSA) is the best way to look at this, but that also has its limitations. For instance, the Southeast gets cheated somewhat with the exclusion of Raleigh-Durham; they are statistically two separate MSAs on paper (and given the way MSAs are designated, I get it) but in reality, they function more as a singular MSA. To a lesser extent, the same is true of the Triad (Greensboro/Winston-Salem) and the Upstate (Greenville/Spartanburg, which is just shy of the 1.5M mark according to the latest estimates but it may have already reached that threshold by now).

Also--and I'm probably going to regret this because it's the dead horse that just continues to get beaten--if the VA Beach-Norfolk metro is included for the Southeast, an argument could be made that the Virginia portion of the DC metro (NoVA) could be included for the region as well.
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