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Old 09-24-2017, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
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DMA: Nielsen Media Markets, 2018
01. New York: 7,074,750
02. Los Angeles: 5,318,630
03. Chicago: 3,299,720
04. Philadelphia: 2,869,580
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,648,490
06. Washington D.C.: 2,492,170
07. Houston: 2,467,140
08. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,451,640
09. Atlanta: 2,449,460
10. Boston: 2,425,440
11. Phoenix: 1,919,930
12. Seattle: 1,880,750
13. Tampa Bay Area: 1,879,760
14. Detroit: 1,779,380
15. Minneapolis/Saint Paul: 1,730,430
16. Miami/Fort Lauderdale: 1,677,850
17. Denver: 1,589,560
18. Orlando: 1,531,130
19. Cleveland: 1,447,310
20. Sacramento: 1,412,940


Page # 21 and # 22 here:

http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/c...kings_2017.pdf

The Top 10 rankings from 2009 to 2018, to recap here:
Quote:
DMA Ranks 2009 - 2018 and change:

2009:
01. New York: 7,433,820
02. Los Angeles: 5,654,260
03. Chicago: 3,492,850
04. Philadelphia: 2,950,220
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,489,970
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,476,450
07. Boston: 2,409,080
08. Atlanta: 2,369,780
09. Washington DC: 2,321,610
10. Houston: 2,106,210

2010:
01. New York: 7,493,530
02. Los Angeles: 5,659,170
03. Chicago: 3,501,010
04. Philadelphia: 2,955,190
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,544,410
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,503,400
07. Boston: 2,410,180
08. Atlanta: 2,387,520
09. Washington DC: 2,335,040
10. Houston: 2,123,460

2011:
01. New York: 7,515,330
02. Los Angeles: 5,666,900
03. Chicago: 3,502,610
04. Philadelphia: 3,015,820
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,594,630
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,523,520
07. Boston: 2,460,290
08. Atlanta: 2,407,080
09. Washington DC 2,389,710
10. Houston: 2,177,220

2012:
01. New York: 7,387,810
02. Los Angeles: 5,569,780
03. Chicago: 3,493,480
04. Philadelphia: 2,993,370
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,571,310
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,506,510
07. Boston: 2,379,690
08. Washington DC 2,360,180
09. Atlanta: 2,292,640
10. Houston: 2,185,260

2013:
01. New York: 7,384,340
02. Los Angeles: 5,613,460
03. Chicago: 3,484,800
04. Philadelphia: 2,949,310
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,588,020
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,502,030
07. Boston: 2,366,690
08. Washington DC: 2,359,160
09. Atlanta: 2,326,840
10. Houston: 2,215,650

2014:
01. New York: 7,461,030
02. Los Angeles: 5,665,780
03. Chicago: 3,534,080
04. Philadelphia: 2,963,500
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,655,290
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,518,900
07. Boston: 2,433,040
08. Washington DC: 2,412,250
09. Atlanta: 2,375,050
10. Houston: 2,289,360

2015:
01. New York: 7,442,270
02. Los Angeles: 5,523,800
03. Chicago: 3,477,250
04. Philadelphia: 2,953,760
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,603,680
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,476,860
07. Boston: 2,423,640
08. Washington DC: 2,408,990
09. Atlanta: 2,334,520
10. Houston: 2,301,230

2016:
01. New York: 7,368,320
02. Los Angeles: 5,489,810
03. Chicago: 3,475,220
04. Philadelphia: 2,917,920
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,646,370
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,484,690
07. Washington D.C.: 2,443,640
08. Boston: 2,411,250
09. Atlanta: 2,385,730
10. Houston: 2,373,700

2017:
01. New York: 7,348,620
02. Los Angeles: 5,476,830
03. Chicago: 3,463,060
04. Philadelphia: 2,942,800
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,713,380
06. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,488,090
07. Washington D.C.: 2,476,680
08. Houston: 2,450,800
09. Boston: 2,424,240
10. Atlanta: 2,412,730

2018:
01. New York: 7,074,750
02. Los Angeles: 5,318,630
03. Chicago: 3,299,720
04. Philadelphia: 2,869,580
05. Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex: 2,648,490
06. Washington D.C.: 2,492,170
07. Houston: 2,467,140
08. San Francisco Bay Area: 2,451,640
09. Atlanta: 2,449,460
10. Boston: 2,425,440
Quite obvious that the Internet is killing off television households.
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,504 posts, read 2,727,471 times
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I wonder why Atlanta, Dallas, D.C. and Houston have actually gained subscribers, while Philly has fluctuated and only posted a small loss. It could be that the huge media presence in Atlanta (Turner) and Philly (Comcast) have helped, but I'm flummoxed over Houston, Dallas and D.C.'s yearly gains. More educated households tend to cut the cord, but D.C. is one of the most educated metros in the nation, so that hypothesis doesn't work for that region (Boston has also fluctuated, and has more subscribers in 2018 than 2009).
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I wonder why Atlanta, D.C. and Houston have actually gained subscribers, while Philly has fluctuated and only posted a small loss. It could be that the huge media presence in Atlanta (Turner) and Philly (Comcast) have helped, but I'm flummoxed as to Houston and D.C.'s yearly gains. More educated households tend to cut the cord, but D.C. is one of the most educated metros in the nation, so that hypothesis doesn't work for that region.
Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Washington D.C. are some of the fastest growing metropolises in America of this decade. In raw numbers, probably all of them along with Miami/Fort Lauderdale, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco Bay Area, and maybe Phoenix have been the biggest gainers.

The thing with Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Washington is that most of their growth in their metropolitan regions have come from families and households. Like out of the nearly 600,000 people added in the DMV, well less than 100,000 have actually been in the urban District of Columbia itself. I think it remains regardless of education levels, families tend to favor television. It's a recreational avenue for them.

In contrast, majority of the growth in the New York metropolitan area has come inside the city of New York, a highly dense and professional laden community, mostly of elder aged singles or couples, few children and few big families compared to the suburbs. Therefore a decline in television households as the suburbs in Greater New York have not grown much at all, some have straight stagnated. Miami/Fort Lauderdale, for example, despite having a large numerical population growth, comprises more of elderly couples, singles, or professionals that have few, if any children. The number of family growth in Miami/Fort Lauderdale is dwarfed by the aforementioned groups. Those aforementioned groups being less into television than their counterparts with a nuclear family of four, for instance.
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,463 posts, read 906,792 times
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Are these maps of the media markets? As I understand it, Nielsen updates media markets frequently. So maybe some of these gains are counties shifting media markets?
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Old 09-25-2017, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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It could very well be that but I was under the impression that they only do that following the decennial census. Not entirely sure though.
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Old 09-26-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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West Palm Beach is considered part of the Miami metro area, but anchors its own separate TV market.

That's why Miami's TV numbers look unimpressive relative to its metro population.
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Old 09-27-2017, 04:48 AM
 
7,175 posts, read 3,866,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeopleAreStrange View Post
West Palm Beach is considered part of the Miami metro area, but anchors its own separate TV market.

That's why Miami's TV numbers look unimpressive relative to its metro population.
West Palm Beach is like 70 miles away from Miami. Thatís not a genuine metro. Iíve long said that media markets are more realistic determinations of cohesive metros than MSA or CSA. If you canít get the cityís local news, you donít live in that metro.
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Old 09-27-2017, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,695,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
West Palm Beach is like 70 miles away from Miami. Thatís not a genuine metro. Iíve long said that media markets are more realistic determinations of cohesive metros than MSA or CSA. If you canít get the cityís local news, you donít live in that metro.
Metropolitan areas are deter by commute patterns. I'm sure you know that but I think it's not of you live in the metro but don't need to go until it you have to.
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Old 09-27-2017, 06:13 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,458 posts, read 2,997,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
West Palm Beach is like 70 miles away from Miami. That’s not a genuine metro. I’ve long said that media markets are more realistic determinations of cohesive metros than MSA or CSA. If you can’t get the city’s local news, you don’t live in that metro.
Who died and anointed you the dictator of what a genuine metro is? We've already established there are various types of singular or poly centric metros across the U.S. Even in some of those you can get places were the separate media markets merge. With that said, calling the end points of Jupiter, FL to Homestead one metro that are 2 and 1/2 hrs and 122 miles away from one another is a bit much. I get that's too far away to be considered cohesive or "one".
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Old 09-27-2017, 06:21 AM
 
7,175 posts, read 3,866,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Metropolitan areas are deter by commute patterns. I'm sure you know that but I think it's not of you live in the metro but don't need to go until it you have to.
Ugh. Commuter patterns are how the Census Bureau determines metro areas. We all understand that. What I am trying to impart is that that is only one way of determining a metro area, and possibly not the best. It’s useful for the census bureau’s needs, and little else.

I think people tend to overlook the fact that the census uses commuting into the core area, not the city. Using DC as an example, let’s say that 15 out of every hundred people in Shepherdstown West Virginia commute to a suburban office park near Dulles airport. That would put Shepherdstown West Virginia in the DC CSA, with 85% of its population having no connection to Metro DC and ZERO percent of its population commuting into the city itself. Without the Census Bureau telling us that it’s part of the metro, no reasonable person would say that Shepherdstown West Virginia is Metropolitan Washington DC.
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