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Old 02-18-2009, 02:31 PM
 
5,642 posts, read 13,598,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
That's crazy talk!

DC's downtown is larger than all of the DT's except Chicago and NYC.
BTW - NYC's DT is dead at night!
I'm curious how you are defining "downtown" DC. Is Georgetown included? DuPont Circle? Adams-Morgan?

Not arguing, just curious...
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Old 02-18-2009, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,576 posts, read 2,303,116 times
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DC might not have high skyscrapers, but the shear number of 6-8 story buildings in it's downtown area is behemoth.
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Old 02-18-2009, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,575 posts, read 53,114,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john_starks View Post
why not? its dense, vibrant, cosmopolitan. a massive urban tapestry. and america is big enough that it won't disrupt our suburban/rural culture.
Cosmopolitan? I dont think so.
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Old 02-19-2009, 06:07 AM
 
4,945 posts, read 8,263,826 times
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No Georgetown, Adams Morgan or Dupont Circle are not Downtown. Keep in mind that the tallest buildings in DT DC are 12 to 13 stories. DT DC is completely built out with no surface parking lots. DC has well over 100 million square feet of commercial office space. By using office space as a criteria, DT DC has more than every other city except NYC and Chicago. Tysons Corner, a DC suburb is in the top 20 cities for commericial office space. If you include Federal office space, then DC is second behind NYC. By land area, DC's DT is huge. It stretches from 23rd Street on the West End all the way to Union Station on Capitol Hill to the east end. From North to South, it stretches from Mass Ave to the National Mall.
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Old 02-19-2009, 10:54 AM
Status: "AndMunch" (set 10 days ago)
 
3,185 posts, read 5,190,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachael84 View Post
Wow, the TOWN on Long Island i'm moving to has only 3,000 less people than the whole city of Greenville
Are you talking about the 300,000 people number or are you talking about the 56,000 people number? lol


(note this isn't the entire skyline either, addititon to that is we are the 2nd or 3rd best place to be in for the recession because companies on about weekly basis are planning new job's here. Just last week Walmart announced as new 500 job facility (not store), Samsung is building a call center that will house 1,000 new jobs (over a 5 yr period), BMW is expanding the only North American factory with another 500 jobs, and yesterday a new movie theater was approved, so much for a recession here)!!! lol The 2nd picture is new, you can see construction going on, on a new hotel, and construction of a Kroc Center.



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Old 01-11-2010, 03:32 PM
 
196 posts, read 373,374 times
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The closest major city to me is Boston. In the heart of the downtown area (the Financial District) it feels almost as though I am walking in New York City. There are hordes of people walking around you, walking to the numerous department stores and businesses around here. Also, about 90% of the tallest buildings in Boston are located within about a mile from here, many of which are over 500 feet. So yes, Boston's bustling downtown does represent its large population.
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Old 03-15-2010, 09:19 PM
 
196 posts, read 373,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Why would anyone want an American city to be like Tokyo?
We already do, New York City
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Old 03-16-2010, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 7,387,983 times
Reputation: 1344
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
No Georgetown, Adams Morgan or Dupont Circle are not Downtown. Keep in mind that the tallest buildings in DT DC are 12 to 13 stories. DT DC is completely built out with no surface parking lots. DC has well over 100 million square feet of commercial office space. By using office space as a criteria, DT DC has more than every other city except NYC and Chicago. Tysons Corner, a DC suburb is in the top 20 cities for commericial office space. If you include Federal office space, then DC is second behind NYC. By land area, DC's DT is huge. It stretches from 23rd Street on the West End all the way to Union Station on Capitol Hill to the east end. From North to South, it stretches from Mass Ave to the National Mall.
The other thing to keep in mind re: downtown DC is the way that downtown bleeds in with other close-in neighborhoods (and even NoVa across the Potomac) to create an incredibly large and dense contiguous urban core. There very few barren or decrepit areas surrounding downtown DC. To the immediate west is the West End and Dupont; to the north is Logan Circle and Shaw, to the northeast is NoMa (which continues to grow--pushing development all the way out to 3rd Street NE), to the east is Capitol Hill, and to the south is the SW/SE federal center. And immediately across the Potomac is Rosslyn, Crystal City and Pentagon City, with their clusters of 20-30 story office and apartment buildings.

Don't mistake a lack of height for a lack of density; if anything, DC's height restriction has led to the development of neighborhoods (such as NoMa) that would likely otherwise remain blighted.
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Old 03-17-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,082 posts, read 2,412,421 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeG2011 View Post
The closest major city to me is Boston. In the heart of the downtown area (the Financial District) it feels almost as though I am walking in New York City. There are hordes of people walking around you, walking to the numerous department stores and businesses around here. Also, about 90% of the tallest buildings in Boston are located within about a mile from here, many of which are over 500 feet. So yes, Boston's bustling downtown does represent its large population.
If anything, Boston's downtown makes Boston seem bigger than it really is. Quite a few larger cities than Boston have smaller downtown areas (eg Los Angeles). Boston is one of the few cities in the U.S. with a daytime population that significantly exceeds the nighttime population (over 40% increase each day). Those people are all coming to work. Boston has four major business districts, each larger than the entire downtown of most cities.
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 7,387,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HenryAlan View Post
If anything, Boston's downtown makes Boston seem bigger than it really is. Quite a few larger cities than Boston have smaller downtown areas (eg Los Angeles). Boston is one of the few cities in the U.S. with a daytime population that significantly exceeds the nighttime population (over 40% increase each day).
DC is about the same - its daytime population exceeds 1 million, and the population of the city itself is only around 600,000.
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