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View Poll Results: What state is more appealing
Connecticut 22 34.38%
Rhode Island 42 65.63%
Voters: 64. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-13-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Boston
7,554 posts, read 15,614,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Those are all east of downtown, right?

I guess I visited the wrong suburbs when I drove down to Providence: most of the ones I saw were west and southwest of the city.
East Greenwich, Wickford, and Pawtuxet Village are all south of downtown.
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Old 09-13-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,900 posts, read 9,610,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MMS02760 View Post
Much of RI's population is situated in just a few communities. It basically follows an inverted Y shaped pattern. Providence is where all three lines meet. The top straight line encompasses the Blackstone River valley towns from Pawtucket to Woonsocket. The angled bottom lines are the communities along Narragansett Bay stretching out from Providence to Bristol in the east and Warwick in the west. The rest of the state is far less densely populated, especially along the western border with CT and in some of the southern towns (Little Compton, Tiverton, Exeter, Richmond).
Yes, I can see what you are saying. I was wondering why the development around Providence just sort of ends. Maybe I am just used to the New York area where development keeps going and going until it hits water or the government puts a stop to it with zoning or restrictions.

Having said that, I was trying to point that out that Connecticut, believe it or not, is still more rural than Rhode Island despite its stereotype of being suburbs of New York City. The eastern rural half of Connecticut alone looks larger than the entire state of Rhode Island and then you can add to that the rural areas of western Connecticut as well.

The other interesting thing you can see from a map is that the two states have bought up extensive lands near each other for conservation purposes. For instance, you have Arcadia Management area (14,000 acres) in Rhode Island just a few miles from the Pachaug State Forest (27,000 acres) in Connecticut. I do not know if this accidental or planned but it is great way to increase the amount of land in an area to be conserved by teaming up with your neighbor.


Arcadia Management Area
https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?q=325068

There are other areas that are similar, where different states have conservation land near each other, including the tri border area where Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut come together and the tri border area where New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts come together.
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Old 09-13-2018, 02:55 PM
 
1,497 posts, read 752,233 times
Reputation: 1174
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Yes, I can see what you are saying. I was wondering why the development around Providence just sort of ends. Maybe I am just used to the New York area where development keeps going and going until it hits water or the government puts a stop to it with zoning or restrictions.

Having said that, I was trying to point that out that Connecticut, believe it or not, is still more rural than Rhode Island despite its stereotype of being suburbs of New York City. The eastern rural half of Connecticut alone looks larger than the entire state of Rhode Island and then you can add to that the rural areas of western Connecticut as well.

The other interesting thing you can see from a map is that the two states have bought up extensive lands near each other for conservation purposes. For instance, you have Arcadia Management area (14,000 acres) in Rhode Island just a few miles from the Pachaug State Forest (27,000 acres) in Connecticut. I do not know if this accidental or planned but it is great way to increase the amount of land in an area to be conserved by teaming up with your neighbor.


Arcadia Management Area
https://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?q=325068

There are other areas that are similar, where different states have conservation land near each other, including the tri border area where Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut come together and the tri border area where New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts come together.

Probably because Providence is not New York. Providence metro has 1.6 million people and that's probably stretching (do New Bedford and Fall River count?), New York has 20 million or whatever.
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Old 09-18-2018, 12:00 AM
 
Location: New Brunswick, NJ
572 posts, read 215,714 times
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Urban areas- Rhode Island. Providence is a more well rounded city & has a better metro than Stamford, New Haven, Hartford, or Bridgeport
Providence>>Stamford>New Haven>Hartford>Bridgeport

Suburbs, towns, and rural parts- Draw, but Connectcut has better upper class/wealthy offerings
Scenery/Recreation- Rhode Island has the bay, Connecticut has some beaches
Infrastructure, Highways, & public transit- Connecticut.
Food & Culture- Draw? I think both are similar enough
Economy- Connecticut
Education- Connecticut. CT wins here but RI is no slouch.
The better package overall- Rhode Island imo, better city & metro. Closer to Boston than CT is to NYC & Boston, lower cost of living.
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Old 09-19-2018, 12:05 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,900 posts, read 9,610,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ASJackson814 View Post
Urban areas- Rhode Island. Providence is a more well rounded city & has a better metro than Stamford, New Haven, Hartford, or Bridgeport
Providence>>Stamford>New Haven>Hartford>Bridgeport

Suburbs, towns, and rural parts- Draw, but Connectcut has better upper class/wealthy offerings
Scenery/Recreation- Rhode Island has the bay, Connecticut has some beaches
Infrastructure, Highways, & public transit- Connecticut.
Food & Culture- Draw? I think both are similar enough
Economy- Connecticut
Education- Connecticut. CT wins here but RI is no slouch.
The better package overall- Rhode Island imo, better city & metro. Closer to Boston than CT is to NYC & Boston, lower cost of living.
I am not sure. On a map, it looks like Connecticut is closer to NYC than Rhode Island is to Boston. In fact, it looks like Connecticut is closer to New Jersey than Rhode Island is to Boston. Getting to New Jersey across the Hudson River is another story.

Otherwise, I agree with most of what you say and I am glad you mentioned Connecticut beaches. Connecticut actually has a long and interesting shoreline with sandy and even some rocky beaches. The problem is shoreline access, there are not enough parks along the Sound so many people do not know about it.

Fun fact regarding beaches.

Suffolk County on Long Island was more or less controlled by Connecticut until the 1660s. If the King did not give Suffolk to his younger brother, the Duke of York, then Suffolk, which has over 1,000 miles of shoreline, might still be part of Connecticut. If that was the case, then Connecticut would control most of both sides of the Long Island Sound and ocean beaches areas like Fire Island, the Hamptons and Montauk.

Last edited by LINative; 09-19-2018 at 01:35 PM..
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Old 09-19-2018, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,181 posts, read 2,025,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post

Suffolk County on Long Island was more or less controlled by Connecticut until the 1660s. If the King did not give Suffolk to his younger brother, the Duke of York, then Suffolk, which has over 1,000 miles of shoreline, might still be part of Connecticut. If that was the case, then Connecticut would control most of both sides of the Long Island Sound and ocean beaches areas like Fire Island, the Hamptons and Montauk.
Boy, Connecticut really got the shaft.

They lost Springfield to Massachusetts, Suffolk to New York and had the Western Reserve taken away to become part of Ohio.
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Old 09-19-2018, 11:31 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,900 posts, read 9,610,066 times
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Default Not to mention Pennsylvania!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Boy, Connecticut really got the shaft.

They lost Springfield to Massachusetts, Suffolk to New York and had the Western Reserve taken away to become part of Ohio.
You can add roughly 40% of Pennsylvania to that list too! Connecticut tried to claim northern Pennsylvania during the colonial period. It was claimed as part of Connecticut's westward to the Pacific colonial charter. Connecticut sent settlers into Pennsylvania and even established a county, Westmoreland County.

Not surprisingly, Pennsylvania resisted what they considered an invasion of their land by Connecticut.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennamite–Yankee_War

Btw, the Westmoreland County that Connecticut established in Pennsylvania is totally different from the modern day Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
883 posts, read 547,049 times
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Overall, towns in Connecticut are much wealthier than towns in Rhode Island, even in areas of the state that are not particularly well off by Connecticut standards (e.g., New London and Windham Counties). As a result, historic small towns and natural areas in Connecticut are more well-kempt and well-preserved than those in Rhode Island. Of course, this fosters a more bucolic and charming atmosphere in Connecticut.

If you strip the roadways of any signage, you will be able to infer the exact moment when you cross into Rhode Island from Connecticut. It doesn't matter if you're crossing into Glocester, RI from Putnam, CT or Westerly, RI from Stonington, CT, you will observe a marked difference between the two states that is transposed at state line.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,181 posts, read 2,025,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Overall, towns in Connecticut are much wealthier than towns in Rhode Island, even in areas of the state that are not particularly well off by Connecticut standards (e.g., New London and Windham Counties). As a result, historic small towns and natural areas in Connecticut are more well-kempt and well-preserved than those in Rhode Island. Of course, this fosters a more bucolic and charming atmosphere in Connecticut.

If you strip the roadways of any signage, you will be able to infer the exact moment when you cross into Rhode Island from Connecticut. It doesn't matter if you're crossing into Glocester, RI from Putnam, CT or Westerly, RI from Stonington, CT, you will observe a marked difference between the two states that is transposed at state line.
You're absolutely right about that, having driven between the two states on numerous occasions. Connecticut's statewide median household income is a good $12k above Rhode Island's, and aside from those fabulous Newport mansions, I have yet to see anything that's as prim-and-proper in Rhode Island as a typical Connecticut town or suburb. But in my book, that works in Rhode Island's favor. I tend to break out in hives when passing through Princeton, N.J., for instance.

But it could also have to do with where the money is concentrated. That video posted upthread was the first I'd seen of many of Providence's bayside suburbs to the city's east, and those didn't look anywhere near as gritty as much of the rest of suburban Rhode Island. And Pennsylvania offers another data point to back this up: its statewide MHI hovers close to (and a few thousand dollars below) Rhode Island's, yet much of the state's southeast and Amish country are as picturesque as anything Connecticut offers.
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Old 09-25-2018, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Boston/UpstateNY/FL
230 posts, read 78,053 times
Reputation: 348
I lived in Nofolk County MA so I may be a little biased.

Urban areas - Connecticut for quantity, Rhode Island for quality
Suburbs, towns, and rural parts - CT for Suburban towns, RI for more unique/exciting towns
Scenery/Recreation - Rhode Island
Infrastructure, Highways, & public transit - N/A
Food & Culture - Rhode Island
Economy - Rhode Island has more growth, even though CT is larger
Education - CT
The better package overall - Lil Rhodey!
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