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Old 10-19-2018, 07:28 AM
 
52,610 posts, read 75,426,573 times
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Royal Oak MI: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4873...6!9m2!1b1!2i38

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4862...6!9m2!1b1!2i38
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Old 10-19-2018, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
903 posts, read 514,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Chestnut Hill, PA
Chestnut Hill is a neighborhood within the city of Philadelphia. It is "urban suburban" in character, but still very much a part of the city of Philadelphia. It often gets confused as being an actual suburb because you can write "Chestnut Hill, PA" or "Philadelphia, PA" on an envelope and it will be delivered no problem.

Upper Darby is probably the most urban actual suburb in the Philadelphia Metro.
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Old 10-19-2018, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,895 posts, read 32,882,944 times
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This thread is fast becoming one of those "moving the goalposts" situations where everyone's subjective opinions of what constitutes an "urban suburb" bounce off of each other and everyone claims to be the ultimate authority on the subject.
Just let people have their say and be done with it. To do otherwise comes off as petty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
I totally agree with Clayton as well
I do wish I'd thought to put Clayton on my list, though.

Last edited by Iconographer; 10-19-2018 at 08:06 AM..
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
903 posts, read 514,426 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
This thread is fast becoming one of those "moving the goalposts" situations where everyone's subjective opinions of what constitutes an "urban suburb" bounce off of each other and everyone claims to be the ultimate authority on the subject.
Just let people have their say and be done with it. To do otherwise comes off as petty.



I do wish I'd thought to put Clayton on my list, though.
The word "suburb" implies it lies outside the main city's boundaries. That excludes any neighborhood actually within a city's boundaries, even if it is suburban in character.
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,895 posts, read 32,882,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
The word "suburb" implies it lies outside the main city's boundaries. That excludes any neighborhood actually within a city's boundaries, even if it is suburban in character.
Take it up with Wikipedia.

"A suburb is a mixed-use or residential area, existing either as part of a city or urban area or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city.[1] In most English-speaking countries, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner-city areas, but in Australian English and South African English, suburb has become largely synonymous with what is called a "neighborhood" in other countries and the term extends to inner-city areas."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suburb

I've seen a gazillion of these threads. There is not, nor will there ever be, a concensus on this.
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Old 10-19-2018, 09:10 AM
 
3,567 posts, read 2,014,636 times
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It's clearly a subjective term.
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Old 10-19-2018, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
1,605 posts, read 736,197 times
Reputation: 1393
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
Oh come on you can't find a Winchester anywhere? seriously did you grow up there or something. And Wellesley I guess they have a college and are wealthy enough to discourage chain stores.
Based on that statement, you think there is more commercial activity in Winchester than Wellesley? And that the difference in affluence plays a part of that? Nonsense.

They two are almost equals in every way, with the exception of the housing stock. Winchester has vast neighborhoods of pre-WWII builds on square lots with tree lines streets. Anything south/east/east of downtown Winchester is essentially out of a story book. Add to that the - aesthetically - nicest downtown and square in the inner ring Boston suburbs, two train stops, the Mystic Lake, the yacht club..

No, I don't think you find that anywhere. In fact, almost nowhere. It's the nicest suburb in Greater Boston IMO.

By the way, I did not grow up in Winchester. Part of my childhood was spent along route 2, and the other in Chicagoland.

Edit: There is a matrix of neighborhoods southeast and west of downtown Winchester. Some street views below, with the downtown at the end:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4533...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4517...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4465...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4396...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4527...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.4524...7i13312!8i6656

Last edited by mwj119; 10-19-2018 at 09:31 AM..
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:02 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,520,894 times
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What qualifies a "top" urban suburb?

Income?

Population?

Density?


Without some guidelines, this is just a free for all for listing any and every suburb of medium or higher density close to its urban center.
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,899 posts, read 10,985,220 times
Reputation: 9772
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
What qualifies a "top" urban suburb?

Income?

Population?

Density?


Without some guidelines, this is just a free for all for listing any and every suburb of medium or higher density close to its urban center.
I was going to post something like this. I was approaching the question as if we were supposed to discuss the most "urban" of suburbs - basically ones which are mini-cities, with lots of apartments, rowhouses, thriving commercial districts, and relatively little in the way of detached single-family homes.

Others seem to be interpreting "top" to mean "best" - and then listing what in their subjective opinion are the best. Because there's no way some of these suggestions are among the 10 densest/most urban suburbs. A lot of them just have a single dense urban node and are pretty much normal suburbia otherwise.
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Old 10-19-2018, 01:07 PM
 
1,952 posts, read 2,567,139 times
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Shaker Heights, OH (just east of Cleveland), definitely belongs high on this list.

It is one of the oldest, completely planned and executed, at once, suburbs -- built in the early decades of the 20th century and was also unique in being inspired and built along high-speed rapid transit to the urban core.

Shaker Heights features:

- high quality, architecturally significant housing, especially mansions.

- significant set-asides for lakes and parks.

- a well-planned, high quality school district with a tradition of not only sending 90% of its graduates to college but to the Ivy League and other of the nation's top colleges, as well.

- after initial racial restrictions, one of the first suburbs to embrace diversity and implement busing students to achieve it (in the early 1960s).

- 2 rapid transit branches with stations within .5 miles of every resident (the suburb is 6 square miles in size; around 28,000 residents.

- many desirable curving streets and lanes oriented to the gently hilly typography in places as well as to the many rapid transit stations.

- a strong national and international reputation for many (or all) of these attributes.
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