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Old 11-02-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
22 posts, read 5,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
On the "Pro" side for Boise.

-Idaho is very homeschool friendly, absolutly no state requirements (though most homeschoolers voluntarily take tests)

-Boise is pretty sunny, nothing like Portland in this regard.

-Plenty of family friendly religious type people.

-Way better and cheaper flight access to California.

-Houses in your price range near Boise. Yes, it will be hard to find that in town, but Kuna, Nampa etc should all have plenty of stuff in that price range.

-"Turn into California" Depends what you mean. The area continues to grow, but lots of the transplants are California Conservatives, so it isn't swinging left anytime soon.

Preference for beauty is subjective, I prefer the drier mountains of the west personally, so in my opinion, Boise is closer to much better scenic beauty than TN,but that is just a preference.

Don't forget that if you are from California, the Humidity in TN could be a rude awakening. It is very humid there. TN also still gets cold, and when it's humid and cold it's even worse. Boise gets kind of cold, but the winters arn't harsh and not that much colder than TN,where you will still see many lows below freezing.

I appreciate your reponse! I have yet to meet a person who has traveled to both cities that can give me a fair comparison. I hear mixed reviews about Kuna & Nampa, some love it.. some say it looks like a brown little farm town. So you prefer the Boise area over Knoxville? We are visiting at the beginning of next year so we'll be able to make a decision
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Old 11-02-2018, 06:08 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo, CA
22 posts, read 5,761 times
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I appreciate your responses fyi living in Knoxville & Chatt wouldnt be a concern as far as the airport situation goes, we dont mind driving to Nashville since we are used to the 4hr drive to LAX everytime we want to go somewhere (&#128532. They have 2 in SLOcounty but they are so small the tickets are mostly double sometimes triple the prices. Unfortunately cant afford that when you have a family with littles & a stay at home mom
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Old 11-02-2018, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
21,214 posts, read 33,194,819 times
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If you were drawn to Chattanooga, you might consider Cleveland, a lovely town about 25 miles to the northeast. It is among other things home to Lee University, a Church of God-affiliated college with a beautiful campus. The Great Smoky Mountains are right at the back door.

Lee University

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Old 11-05-2018, 05:27 PM
 
700 posts, read 209,261 times
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Boise summers can be quite hot (similar to Escondido and other inland parts of Southern California) and very dry, even drier than SoCal. The dryness can be a problem, too, because then you get nosebleeds, cracked skin, dandruff, etc.

Eastern Tennessee is more humid than San Diego but drier than Florida and the Gulf Coast. They also receive abundant summer rain, which helps cool things off, vs. Boise, where, like SoCal, summer rain is very rare and there'll be no relief on hot days.

Which means Tennessee stays green even during the summer whereas Boise can get brown and desert-like during the summer.

Also, Chattanooga is close (only two hours or so) to Atlanta, while Boise is 6 and a half hours to Portland.
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Old 11-06-2018, 09:19 AM
 
2,614 posts, read 4,864,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Boise summers can be quite hot (similar to Escondido and other inland parts of Southern California) and very dry, even drier than SoCal. The dryness can be a problem, too, because then you get nosebleeds, cracked skin, dandruff, etc.

Eastern Tennessee is more humid than San Diego but drier than Florida and the Gulf Coast. They also receive abundant summer rain, which helps cool things off, vs. Boise, where, like SoCal, summer rain is very rare and there'll be no relief on hot days.

Which means Tennessee stays green even during the summer whereas Boise can get brown and desert-like during the summer.

Also, Chattanooga is close (only two hours or so) to Atlanta, while Boise is 6 and a half hours to Portland.
Actually, 8 to 9 months out of the year Boise is a lush oasis with an impressive urban canopy. The entire valley outside of the built up areas is irrigated ag land and is quite scenic. There are groves of cottonwood trees that line the river through the city and valley. Boise also has beautiful manicured parks and people love their green lawns.

Winter can seem "brown" because most of the trees are deciduous but it is still easy on the eyes of course. If a person wants to be in evergreen trees, some of the largest areas of forest in the west begin right above the city on the mountain tops.

Even on Boise's hottest days during the summer the evenings cool down and are very pleasant.

The desire to be near another large city is subjective. Boise is the big city for hundreds of miles in any direction (as is Denver, Salt Lake, etc.) and punches above its size with urban amenities. Boise is the base camp for some of the nations finest scenery; McCall and Payette Lake, Stanley and the Sawtooth Wilderness, Sun Valley, The River of No Return Wilderness, The Owyhee Canyonlands, the West's best whitewater rivers...the list goes on and on.
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Old 11-06-2018, 10:48 AM
 
700 posts, read 209,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
Actually, 8 to 9 months out of the year Boise is a lush oasis with an impressive urban canopy. The entire valley outside of the built up areas is irrigated ag land and is quite scenic. There are groves of cottonwood trees that line the river through the city and valley. Boise also has beautiful manicured parks and people love their green lawns.

Winter can seem "brown" because most of the trees are deciduous but it is still easy on the eyes of course. If a person wants to be in evergreen trees, some of the largest areas of forest in the west begin right above the city on the mountain tops.

Even on Boise's hottest days during the summer the evenings cool down and are very pleasant.

The desire to be near another large city is subjective. Boise is the big city for hundreds of miles in any direction (as is Denver, Salt Lake, etc.) and punches above its size with urban amenities. Boise is the base camp for some of the nations finest scenery; McCall and Payette Lake, Stanley and the Sawtooth Wilderness, Sun Valley, The River of No Return Wilderness, The Owyhee Canyonlands, the West's best whitewater rivers...the list goes on and on.
I have been to Idaho, been to Yellowstone and the Tetons, saw the conifer forests. However, they pale in comparison with the greenery you see in the South.

True, it does cool down on summer nights, but that is actually a negative to many people. Most people want warm nights during the summer so they can go out and enjoy a concert or fireworks in the park without huddling under jackets or blankets.
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Old 11-06-2018, 11:03 AM
 
2,614 posts, read 4,864,990 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
I have been to Idaho, been to Yellowstone and the Tetons, saw the conifer forests. However, they pale in comparison with the greenery you see in the South.

True, it does cool down on summer nights, but that is actually a negative to many people. Most people want warm nights during the summer so they can go out and enjoy a concert or fireworks in the park without huddling under jackets or blankets.
Yellowstone (except for a small portion) and The Tetons are not in Idaho, although the western edge of The Tetons is along the state line. The greenery- in addition to other colors-- in Idaho's forests, especially north of Boise and into central and north Idaho is quite impressive. You might be thrilled to know there are ancient cedar groves in Idaho as well as the worlds furthest inland temperate rain forest that is shared with British Columbia and Washington.

The cool down during summer nights in Boise does not mean it is cold and jackets/blankets are required. Summer nights in Boise are mild enough for a dip in a cool swimming pool or taking a bike ride around town in shorts.

Last edited by Syringaloid; 11-06-2018 at 11:12 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 11-06-2018, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,251 posts, read 15,572,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eatpraylovemom View Post
I appreciate your responses fyi living in Knoxville & Chatt wouldnt be a concern as far as the airport situation goes, we dont mind driving to Nashville since we are used to the 4hr drive to LAX everytime we want to go somewhere (&#128532. They have 2 in SLOcounty but they are so small the tickets are mostly double sometimes triple the prices. Unfortunately cant afford that when you have a family with littles & a stay at home mom
I don't know if this was mentioned about Chattanooga, but traffic crossing the Tennessee River anywhere in the city tends to get backed up frequently. Although I've had only limited visits to Chattanooga since I've moved back to Tennessee (originally from here), I wasn't that impressed. The downtown is incredible - with a young vibe and a good presence of tech/IT companies for a relatively small metro. Outside of the downtown, I wasn't impressed with what I saw.

Knoxville is closer to me, and is growing on me. It has all the shopping and amenities I need, somewhat less traffic (40 and Kingston Pike can be issues at rush hour, but not as bad as the river in Chattanooga IMO). It also tends to be somewhat cheaper, with more upscale suburbs (Farragut). It feels much more livable and complete than Chattanooga IMO.
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Old 11-06-2018, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,350 posts, read 3,427,117 times
Reputation: 3066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I don't know if this was mentioned about Chattanooga, but traffic crossing the Tennessee River anywhere in the city tends to get backed up frequently. Although I've had only limited visits to Chattanooga since I've moved back to Tennessee (originally from here), I wasn't that impressed. The downtown is incredible - with a young vibe and a good presence of tech/IT companies for a relatively small metro. Outside of the downtown, I wasn't impressed with what I saw.

Knoxville is closer to me, and is growing on me. It has all the shopping and amenities I need, somewhat less traffic (40 and Kingston Pike can be issues at rush hour, but not as bad as the river in Chattanooga IMO). It also tends to be somewhat cheaper, with more upscale suburbs (Farragut). It feels much more livable and complete than Chattanooga IMO.
I agree, especially with the last part.
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Old 11-06-2018, 03:49 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,048 posts, read 889,741 times
Reputation: 2439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
Actually, 8 to 9 months out of the year Boise is a lush oasis with an impressive urban canopy. The entire valley outside of the built up areas is irrigated ag land and is quite scenic. There are groves of cottonwood trees that line the river through the city and valley. Boise also has beautiful manicured parks and people love their green lawns.

Winter can seem "brown" because most of the trees are deciduous but it is still easy on the eyes of course. If a person wants to be in evergreen trees, some of the largest areas of forest in the west begin right above the city on the mountain tops.

Even on Boise's hottest days during the summer the evenings cool down and are very pleasant.

The desire to be near another large city is subjective. Boise is the big city for hundreds of miles in any direction (as is Denver, Salt Lake, etc.) and punches above its size with urban amenities. Boise is the base camp for some of the nations finest scenery; McCall and Payette Lake, Stanley and the Sawtooth Wilderness, Sun Valley, The River of No Return Wilderness, The Owyhee Canyonlands, the West's best whitewater rivers...the list goes on and on.
Yeah, even if it hits the upper 90s or 100s even, more often than not it drops into the 60s at night. You can sleep with your windows open the vast majority of the summer. You can't really do that in the south, at least, you wouldn't want to most of the summer.

The humidity back east is going to be a shocker for anyone who grew up out west.
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