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Old 10-22-2018, 05:19 PM
 
12 posts, read 3,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VOPII View Post
New England isn't paved with gold. It's no different than the rest of the Northeast. History. Universities. Sports. Accents. Four seasons. Provincial. Congested. Etc.
Mostly just looking for new nature and smaller cities to explore on my time off. That's just a lot easier with a pick up truck with a bed set up in the back.
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Old 10-22-2018, 05:28 PM
 
12 posts, read 3,215 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by sad_hotline View Post
I'm actually wondering the same question, Portland vs Philadelphia, and am big on the same things you are looking for OP, chiefly a strong underground/DIY arts scene. I'm a big fan of Portland's music scene, which made me really interested in the city, but as you mentioned there are some pretty serious changes underway in Portland, and I've read quite a bit about all the tensions and havoc it has wrought. Philadelphia may not have the green allure of Portland, but from my forays into the city, even for a little while, I've seen tons of underground art. It's fantastic. I'm trying to listen more to the Philadelphia music scene, and I'm starting to find some amazing groups. I've heard here and there that Philly's surge in popularity has made it difficult for some artists to remain, but I think things are settling. After all, Philadelphia is currently 500k people fewer than its peak around the mid 20th century, so there is always room.

I wouldn't leave out Baltimore either. My friend is there and she's having a great time playing in a band around the city.

I feel you! I had heard similar things and planned to move there before ending up in Brooklyn. I have a few good friends from Portland who have moved to Philly in the last year or so. When I visited they seemed to like it alright. The two that I talked to about music did seem to think that there were only a few DIY/house shows a month. They seemed to be running with a fairly hip crowd but maybe they just weren't in the loop. I'm not sure, I haven't spent much time there, I kinda just took there word for it. Tbh I didn't love my first impression, but I was kinda comparing it more to Brooklyn at the time

And you are right, there are a lot of changes going on in Portland but I'm trying to look at them in a positive light. I still think its the cheapest major city on the West Coast. But the growth might bring some more interesting/diverse aspects to the city. I was just reading an article about how four new caribbean restaurants opened in the last year, and they are the first caribbean restaurants the city has ever had.

Also I've never been to another city that has a number of house shows a week, sometimes nightly, sometimes multiple a night on the weekends. I haven't been there in about a year, but have heard the scene is still going strong. Plus you are super close to Olympia which has an amazing DIY scene as well.

I wish Philly gave me a better impression to start, I heard such good things, and I wanted to like it. In the long run, I'm not sure how much I even like Brooklyn. I think I'm gunna be heading back to Portland at the end of this semester or next!!
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Old 10-22-2018, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Not in Quebec
249 posts, read 94,757 times
Reputation: 373
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1000flowersbloom View Post
I feel you! I had heard similar things and planned to move there before ending up in Brooklyn. I have a few good friends from Portland who have moved to Philly in the last year or so. When I visited they seemed to like it alright. The two that I talked to about music did seem to think that there were only a few DIY/house shows a month. They seemed to be running with a fairly hip crowd but maybe they just weren't in the loop. I'm not sure, I haven't spent much time there, I kinda just took there word for it. Tbh I didn't love my first impression, but I was kinda comparing it more to Brooklyn at the time

And you are right, there are a lot of changes going on in Portland but I'm trying to look at them in a positive light. I still think its the cheapest major city on the West Coast. But the growth might bring some more interesting/diverse aspects to the city. I was just reading an article about how four new caribbean restaurants opened in the last year, and they are the first caribbean restaurants the city has ever had.

Also I've never been to another city that has a number of house shows a week, sometimes nightly, sometimes multiple a night on the weekends. I haven't been there in about a year, but have heard the scene is still going strong. Plus you are super close to Olympia which has an amazing DIY scene as well.

I wish Philly gave me a better impression to start, I heard such good things, and I wanted to like it. In the long run, I'm not sure how much I even like Brooklyn. I think I'm gunna be heading back to Portland at the end of this semester or next!!
Wow, I didn't know house shows were still going so strong. I hear so much from some Portlanders about how amazing everything was 15-20 years ago. So many great smalltime bands were rocking house shows in the 2000s, and I thought it had died down, but if things are still going strong, I might tip towards Portland.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGukMpwNrF4
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Old 10-23-2018, 09:25 AM
 
5,427 posts, read 8,225,199 times
Reputation: 4524
Based on your user name I'll direct you to Philly as there are some amazing public gardens in the Philly/Wilmington area. Many are accessible by public transit. Some of the more remote (like Longwood) will probably be available on a day trip through a tour bus company. Check the tourist office. Yes there are Philly neighborhoods with more trees.
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Old 10-23-2018, 10:05 AM
 
2 posts, read 561 times
Reputation: 10
Philadelphia has the most public gardens and arboretums of anywhere in the US. It's where the first one was started in 1728.

[url=http://americasgardencapital.org/]Philadelphia is America's Garden Capital[/url]

It also has some of the most tree canopied neighborhoods in the US.

Don't judge the entire city just because most of South Philly or Northeast Philly is without trees. You're selling yourself short by not visiting the NW, W and Center City areas which are full of trees.

Yes, this is Philadelphia city limits. But.. "rowhomes, etc." right?

[url]https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0541339,-75.2024043,3a,60y,213.9h,95.51t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s_5bs_ZOaoV4Dxs0IBesi7A!2e0!7i1 3312!8i6656?hl=en[/url]
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Old 10-23-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,676 posts, read 1,782,587 times
Reputation: 2230
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEFC View Post
Philadelphia has the most public gardens and arboretums of anywhere in the US. It's where the first one was started in 1728.

Philadelphia is America's Garden Capital

It also has some of the most tree canopied neighborhoods in the US.

Don't judge the entire city just because most of South Philly or Northeast Philly is without trees. You're selling yourself short by not visiting the NW, W and Center City areas which are full of trees.

Yes, this is Philadelphia city limits. But.. "rowhomes, etc." right?

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0541...2!8i6656?hl=en
Don't know what you did in posting this, but the links don't work. Based on what I see below, you need to put the URLs themselves in quotation marks within the opening [url] tag. (Though the links work when I quote your post instead, I see.)

Are you familiar with TreePhilly?

This program, sponsored by the city's Department of Parks and Recreation with support from the Fairmount Park Conservancy and TD Bank, was established to advance former Mayor Michael Nutter's sustainability goal of having a 30 percent tree canopy in every city neighborhood. (By the way, I think that the U.S. Forest Service's measurements of tree canopy do not count urban parkland towards the total, as such land is not built upon. If I'm right, that means that those arboretums and gardens don't count - nor do the 1,700-plus acres of Fairmount Park and the Wissahickon Valley.)

It gives away yard and street trees to any property owner who requests them. Parks and Rec plants and maintains curbside street trees. Planting and maintenance of yard trees is the owner's responsibility.

Edited to add: After taking a look at the Google Street View image you posted - it's one of the 7900 block of Elbow Lane in Mt. Airy, one of the three neighborhoods that make up upper Northwest Philadelphia - I do need to point out that it and its immediate vicinity are an exception to the rule when it comes to pattern of development and do not fit at all the standard "rowhouse" pattern. Rowhouses are actually less prevalent in the Upper Northwest (and also Roxborough on the other side of the Wissahickon Valley) than they are in most of the rest of the city. Instead, you find twins, or as on Elbow Lane, single-family detached houses. It's easier to create a good tree canopy in such districts simply because there is some open land available for planting trees.

In the rowhouse precincts of North, West and South Philadelphia and the River Wards, you basically have to break concrete in order to plant trees, whether along the curb or in the postage-stamp-sized rear patios of the houses. This, along with popular misconceptions about trees causing damage where their roots spread, helps inhibit the spread of the tree canopy in these neighborhoods, I'd say.

The Northeast and Yorktown in North Philly have no such excuses to throw up in the face of efforts to expand the tree canopy.

Last edited by MarketStEl; 10-23-2018 at 12:34 PM..
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Old 10-23-2018, 12:54 PM
 
40 posts, read 17,100 times
Reputation: 59
Richmond sounds like a good fit if you're ok with a relatively small town. It doesn't provide the feeling of true city life (in my opinion) and lacks good public transportation, but you did say this wasn't a dealbreaker.

Richmond has great proximity to nature providing you the ability to hike, kayak, rock climb, and mountain bike very close to the city. It's also not a far drive from the beach.

What you should consider is that it's only about a third of the size of the next largest city you named. This limits some of the other stuff you were mentioning. If I were you I would choose Philly or Baltimore, but definitely check out Richmond based on what you said.
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Old 10-23-2018, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
508 posts, read 471,361 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesJay64 View Post
Richmond sounds like a good fit if you're ok with a relatively small town. It doesn't provide the feeling of true city life (in my opinion) and lacks good public transportation, but you did say this wasn't a dealbreaker.

Richmond has great proximity to nature providing you the ability to hike, kayak, rock climb, and mountain bike very close to the city. It's also not a far drive from the beach.

What you should consider is that it's only about a third of the size of the next largest city you named. This limits some of the other stuff you were mentioning. If I were you I would choose Philly or Baltimore, but definitely check out Richmond based on what you said.
Oh, I can just feel the Baltimore shade exuding from your post!
Let's get something straight, Richmond is modest, but it is a city:





My photos

True, we don't have the best public transit, but the new BRT system is a step in the right direction for a city of its size.
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Old 10-24-2018, 09:58 AM
 
40 posts, read 17,100 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
Oh, I can just feel the Baltimore shade exuding from your post!
Let's get something straight, Richmond is modest, but it is a city:





My photos

True, we don't have the best public transit, but the new BRT system is a step in the right direction for a city of its size.
I love Richmond! I'm only commenting on multiple Richmond posts because I only speak to places I'm very familiar with, and I keep seeing it come up. It's a city, and can be a great fit for some people. My brother relocated to Richmond from Chicago and loves it.

I do think you have to be a somewhat outdoorsy type to fully appreciate it there - if someone's number one goal is live in a big city (this isn't OP's goal), I think they should look elsewhere. Though I'm very envious of the rent Richmonder's pay, I like cities large enough to provide a truly immersive CITY experience, provided by vibrancy, density, and stuff like that, which really can't be found in Virginia (Richmond is the best example, however).
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Old 10-24-2018, 10:07 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,362 posts, read 2,261,081 times
Reputation: 3695
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesJay64 View Post
I like cities large enough to provide a truly immersive CITY experience, provided by vibrancy, density, and stuff like that, which really can't be found in Virginia (Richmond is the best example, however).
What are you talking about here? Richmond has all of these things in relative abundance...

Everyone already recognizes Richmond is the smallest city of the bunch, including the OP, so I'm not sure it bears repeating. Your mistake is in continually looking for Richmond to offer the same scale of amenities and experience as much larger cities...

I've been to a ton of similarly-sized cities to Richmond, many times over. Without a doubt Richmond is one of only a few of those cities that could even be brought up in a comparison with cities over twice its size. Richmond is an absolute jewel for its tier of all comparably sized cities, sorry you seem to not get it...
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