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Old 01-29-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,322 posts, read 1,593,448 times
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Both of these metros get their drinking/irrigation water from their adjacent mountains. I don't have any idea if either one has a large surplus or not.

Denver is at a disadvantage in that it is lee ward (dry side) of the mountains, whereas SLC is windward (west) of its mountains. However, Denver, being closer to the gulf of Mexico, probably gets more moisture from the SE in the form of thunderstorms and upslope snowstorms than SLC (which doesn't experience upslope conditions I think, but not sure.

Which of these two metros has more available fresh water?
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Old 01-30-2019, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Denver doesn't get thunderstorms. I've been here a year and can remember one thunderstorm.
What is an upslope snowstorm? Coming from the south or east?
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,395 posts, read 7,860,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Denver doesn't get thunderstorms. I've been here a year and can remember one thunderstorm.
What is an upslope snowstorm? Coming from the south or east?
This actually isn't completely true. Last year we barely got any rain at all with only 8 inches (Lowest since 2002). Afternoon thunderstorms are usually a common occurrence during the Summer months.
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Old 01-31-2019, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,854 posts, read 1,852,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Both of these metros get their drinking/irrigation water from their adjacent mountains. I don't have any idea if either one has a large surplus or not.

Denver is at a disadvantage in that it is lee ward (dry side) of the mountains, whereas SLC is windward (west) of its mountains. However, Denver, being closer to the gulf of Mexico, probably gets more moisture from the SE in the form of thunderstorms and upslope snowstorms than SLC (which doesn't experience upslope conditions I think, but not sure.

Which of these two metros has more available fresh water?
Westerly wind hits the Sierras and lifts up over the huge expanse of NV and UT before being falling back into the ground between the Wahsatch and Rockies. Salt Lake city is in this dry valley between the Sierras and the Wahsatch. SLC gets its water out of the Wahsatch, while Denver gets it from the Rockies. The Rockies do have a higher mean snowfall average, but how that relates to Prior-appropriation rights between the two and the resulting access to water, I wouldn't know. SLC is ten years older than Denver, but Denver has access to more potential water but they have to share that water with numerous down river entities.


Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Denver doesn't get thunderstorms. I've been here a year and can remember one thunderstorm.
What is an upslope snowstorm? Coming from the south or east?
One year does not a weather pattern make. Some years we get them nearly every summer afternoon. Wait until your car gets hammered by golf ball sized hail and you'll re-evaluate our lack of thunderstorms.

Upslope is a weather phrases you should familiarize yourself with. It is a phenomenon when low pressure sits over AZ and funnels moisture in a counter clockwise direction from the Gulf of Baja up through NM and up against the eastern slope of the Rockies. This is in contrast to the normal jet stream pattern I spoke about above that dumps Pacific moisture right on top of the Rockies. Another term to know is Albuquerque low, where an upslope condition occurs and moves east in to NM and stalls briefly over Albuquerque and pumps that moisture against the mountains for a day or two.

Here is a good read for you: https://www.ess.uci.edu/~yu/class/es...wstorm.all.pdf
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Old 01-31-2019, 09:16 AM
 
40 posts, read 13,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Westerly wind hits the Sierras and lifts up over the huge expanse of NV and UT before being falling back into the ground between the Wahsatch and Rockies. Salt Lake city is in this dry valley between the Sierras and the Wahsatch. SLC gets its water out of the Wahsatch, while Denver gets it from the Rockies. The Rockies do have a higher mean snowfall average, but how that relates to Prior-appropriation rights between the two and the resulting access to water, I wouldn't know. SLC is ten years older than Denver, but Denver has access to more potential water but they have to share that water with numerous down river entities.




One year does not a weather pattern make. Some years we get them nearly every summer afternoon. Wait until your car gets hammered by golf ball sized hail and you'll re-evaluate our lack of thunderstorms.

Upslope is a weather phrases you should familiarize yourself with. It is a phenomenon when low pressure sits over AZ and funnels moisture in a counter clockwise direction from the Gulf of Baja up through NM and up against the eastern slope of the Rockies. This is in contrast to the normal jet stream pattern I spoke about above that dumps Pacific moisture right on top of the Rockies. Another term to know is Albuquerque low, where an upslope condition occurs and moves east in to NM and stalls briefly over Albuquerque and pumps that moisture against the mountains for a day or two.

Here is a good read for you: https://www.ess.uci.edu/~yu/class/es...wstorm.all.pdf
How much snow do the Rockies get on average, the upper Wasatch averages 500 inches a year.
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Old 02-03-2019, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,322 posts, read 1,593,448 times
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Thanks for your posts. In all honesty, this question was too complex to answer by the average layman. I would probably need to consult the Dept of Water Resources for each state (CO and UT) to get some hard facts.
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Old Yesterday, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Valle Luna, Phoenix, AZ
4,412 posts, read 3,350,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Both of these metros get their drinking/irrigation water from their adjacent mountains. I don't have any idea if either one has a large surplus or not.

Denver is at a disadvantage in that it is lee ward (dry side) of the mountains, whereas SLC is windward (west) of its mountains. However, Denver, being closer to the gulf of Mexico, probably gets more moisture from the SE in the form of thunderstorms and upslope snowstorms than SLC (which doesn't experience upslope conditions I think, but not sure.

Which of these two metros has more available fresh water?
Both cities rely on the Colorado River just like we do here in Phoenix. Not sure if any are a better option than us at this point.
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Old Today, 09:14 AM
 
40 posts, read 13,713 times
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Northern Utah doesn't get as much from the Colorado River, alot of our water comes from the reservoirs in the area from the snowmelt of the Wasatch and Uintahs. BTW I did look it up The wasatch resorts get 450-500 inches of snow on average and Colorado mountains get more in the 300-380 range on average. I will say regarding the surplus question, SLC definitely does not have a surplus because of 5 out of 7 super dry years. This year has been better than average but we need 3-4 straight winters like this one to really help us feel good about our water situation.

Another issue I think effects both Salt lake and probably Denver is the overuse of water by residents, companies, etc. Salt Lake should move the Phoenix route by planting more native plants that don't need water, and less grass because there are way to many yards and companies with grass in this area.
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