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View Poll Results: What cities in the poll in 1950, were leaders of the US in terms of the following, but today are a s
Boston, MA 1 0.78%
New York City, NY 1 0.78%
Newark, NJ 2 1.55%
Hartford, CT 2 1.55%
Providence, RI 0 0%
Buffalo, NY 8 6.20%
Rochester, NY 3 2.33%
Erie, PA 0 0%
Pittsburgh, PA 3 2.33%
Philadelphia, PA 3 2.33%
Baltimore, MD 2 1.55%
Syracuse, NY 0 0%
Albany, NY 0 0%
Cleveland, OH 11 8.53%
Cincinnati, OH 3 2.33%
Detroit, MI 59 45.74%
Grand Rapids, MI 0 0%
Chicago, IL 6 4.65%
Milwaukee, WI 0 0%
St Louis, MO 14 10.85%
Kansas City, MO 1 0.78%
Toledo, OH 1 0.78%
Akron, OH 0 0%
Dayton, OH 0 0%
Denver, CO 0 0%
Albuquerque, NM 0 0%
Las Vegas, NV 0 0%
Oklahoma City, OK 1 0.78%
San Francisco, CA 0 0%
Omaha, NE 0 0%
New Orleans, LA 2 1.55%
Minneapolis, MN 0 0%
Memphis, TN 3 2.33%
Atlanta, GA 2 1.55%
Birmingham, AL 1 0.78%
Voters: 129. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-03-2019, 04:58 AM
 
1,646 posts, read 1,294,753 times
Reputation: 1626

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Big in Millennial culture vs. previous generations:
- Seattle
- Austin
- Portland
- Atlanta
- Houston
- Columbus
- Miami
- Nashville
- NYC (maybe)


Lessened influence in Millennial culture vs. previous generations:
- Chicago
- Cleveland
- St. Louis
- Memphis
- Milwaukee
- LA
- Philadelphia
- Baltimore

Highly correlated with, but not the same as, population growth (e.g. Vegas and Phoenix are growing quickly but don't seem to be developing a lot of cultural presence or celebrities/famous bands)
um, I’m a millennial and the first list is completely wrong.

I think it depends on where you grew up and went to college but the only cities millennials really talked about and ended up moving to post graduation were the big cities - Chicago, DC, NYC and San Fran. I know a few people who ended up in Austin and Seattle as well.

Anyway, to answer the OP question, without a doubt Detriot.
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,486 posts, read 1,309,551 times
Reputation: 1719
Quote:
Originally Posted by FalstaffBlues View Post
This seems like a useless thread. The answer is obvious.

Its all the rust belt cities.

Detroit
Cleveland
St. Lous
Cincy
Pittsburgh
Baltimore

They are all the right answer.

If I had to pick one it would be Pittsburgh. No metro area has lost population the way Pittsburgh has.
Metro Detroit is still the automotive capital of North America, it’s not like it has been replaced. It has just as much influence in the automotive sector as it always had, the same can’t be said of some of the other cities you have listed as obvious answers.
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:43 AM
 
Location: MSP
415 posts, read 1,062,694 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricPost View Post
Chicago and Illinois are a complete mess. They have far too many economic burdens to recover. Chicago will sink very slowly the way of Detroit.

It was only 15 years ago, Chicago was supposed to have hit ten million people, now it's shrinking, and it's doubtful it will ever have that many people and the Washington/Baltimore Metro and SF/SJ metro are both within 200,000 people of passing Chicago and growing very rapidly.

In terms of city proper by 2030, Chicago will sink to 4th place likely.

St Louis is another text example in 1950 it was home to nearly 20% of the nation's largest companies. Now it has only a few Fortune 500 companies.

The Twin Cities have a growth problem that is centered around the people moving there are not bringing skills with them. So while the metro area is growing and surpassed Detroit Metro in gross metro product, it's misleading, as the Twin Cities only passed Detroit because Detroit shrank so much. Added to Minnesota's general liberal welfare allowance has drawn people form WI, IL and IA and the Dakotas to collect benefits. This is not adding anything to economy. And a huge influx of foreign immigration show that while they do establish small businesses, two thirds of their profits are sent back home, and do not factor in at all to local, state or national growth.
Regarding the Twin Cities, your post is not accurate.
1. The Twin Cities GDP has been growing at a healthy clip and continues to do so. This can be found by doing a simple Google search.
2. The Twin Cities are pulling in a lot of educated residents from the places you mentioned. Growth has been a combination of births, international migration, and domestic migration. There are also many international migrants that come to the area with high levels of education. I work with many on a day to day basis and their numbers continue to grow.
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:46 PM
 
2,948 posts, read 1,397,710 times
Reputation: 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Metro Detroit is still the automotive capital of North America, it’s not like it has been replaced. It has just as much influence in the automotive sector as it always had, the same can’t be said of some of the other cities you have listed as obvious answers.
I respect your defense for Detroit as a Canadian. But part of the problem in how far Detroit fell was .... it failed to diversify more its economy from the Auto industry sadly.
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:58 PM
 
1,764 posts, read 2,088,685 times
Reputation: 1731
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Yeah, I screwed up there and hit the publish button before I could allow for multiple options. LOL Sorry about that.

I agree that a lot of cities in the rust belt take the crown...
Then if you knew the answer, what was the point of making this thread? To pour on the past-their-prime, derelict rust-belt cities?
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Old 02-03-2019, 01:21 PM
 
3,804 posts, read 3,327,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I respect your defense for Detroit as a Canadian. But part of the problem in how far Detroit fell was .... it failed to diversify more its economy from the Auto industry sadly.
I would say that for 1970's/80's Detroit you are correct. In current times the restructure of the auto industry, combined with economic diversification has put Detroit is in a much better position. Coming into the 1970s Detroit had an expensive labor force that lost their jobs to cheaper competition in the American south, Mexico, and Asia. Detroit was bound to go through a couple decades of correction with so much of it's economy was tied to an uneducated work force. What remains is the automotive brain trust for the OEMs, major tier 1/2 companies, and foreign automakers also keeps a big chunk of their North American R&D and engineering arms near Detroit. Detroit is a Corporate and R&D center in 2020 America, not a manufacturing center.

Automotive is a global industry these days, American and Foreign OEMs have a major economic impact on 4 continents. Even small lower tier suppliers have operations in both directions overseas. An argument could easily be made that Detroit's influence has actually expanded because of this. A slow down in automotive no longer affects just Detroit. The decisions out of Detroit have an economic impact in Europe, Asia, South America, Canada, Mexico, and other parts of the US.
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Old 02-03-2019, 01:36 PM
 
2,948 posts, read 1,397,710 times
Reputation: 2140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I would say that for 1970's/80's Detroit you are correct. In current times the restructure of the auto industry, combined with economic diversification has put Detroit is in a much better position. Coming into the 1970s Detroit had an expensive labor force that lost their jobs to cheaper competition in the American south, Mexico, and Asia. Detroit was bound to go through a couple decades of correction with so much of it's economy was tied to an uneducated work force. What remains is the automotive brain trust for the OEMs, major tier 1/2 companies, and foreign automakers also keeps a big chunk of their North American R&D and engineering arms near Detroit. Detroit is a Corporate and R&D center in 2020 America, not a manufacturing center.

Automotive is a global industry these days, American and Foreign OEMs have a major economic impact on 4 continents. Even small lower tier suppliers have operations in both directions overseas. An argument could easily be made that Detroit's influence has actually expanded because of this. A slow down in automotive no longer affects just Detroit. The decisions out of Detroit have an economic impact in Europe, Asia, South America, Canada, Mexico, and other parts of the US.
Yes, the city clearly isn't just about Autos. It can't today. But I did mean leading up to bankruptcy and one could point to the city just had too much to rise from. Even White-flight was probably the worst of any major city.

Just interjecting a aspect that hurt Detroit's demise that it clearly now is rising from today especially.
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Old 02-03-2019, 02:31 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,484 posts, read 4,919,154 times
Reputation: 2636
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Big in Millennial culture vs. previous generations:
- Seattle
- Austin
- Portland
- Atlanta
- Houston
- Columbus
- Miami
- Nashville
- NYC (maybe)

Lessened influence in Millennial culture vs. previous generations:
- Chicago
- Cleveland
- St. Louis
- Memphis
- Milwaukee
- LA
- Philadelphia
- Baltimore

Highly correlated with, but not the same as, population growth (e.g. Vegas and Phoenix are growing quickly but don't seem to be developing a lot of cultural presence or celebrities/famous bands)
This list seems to be fueled by personal preference and not factual information.

Outside of New York, the first list is quite off. The second list should not include Chicago, Philadelphia or LA, those are all still very strong contenders among attracting young people.
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Old 02-03-2019, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Paris
1,695 posts, read 2,007,134 times
Reputation: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricPost View Post
Chicago and Illinois are a complete mess. They have far too many economic burdens to recover. Chicago will sink very slowly the way of Detroit.

It was only 15 years ago, Chicago was supposed to have hit ten million people, now it's shrinking, and it's doubtful it will ever have that many people and the Washington/Baltimore Metro and SF/SJ metro are both within 200,000 people of passing Chicago and growing very rapidly.

In terms of city proper by 2030, Chicago will sink to 4th place likely.

St Louis is another text example in 1950 it was home to nearly 20% of the nation's largest companies. Now it has only a few Fortune 500 companies.

The Twin Cities have a growth problem that is centered around the people moving there are not bringing skills with them. So while the metro area is growing and surpassed Detroit Metro in gross metro product, it's misleading, as the Twin Cities only passed Detroit because Detroit shrank so much. Added to Minnesota's general liberal welfare allowance has drawn people form WI, IL and IA and the Dakotas to collect benefits. This is not adding anything to economy. And a huge influx of foreign immigration show that while they do establish small businesses, two thirds of their profits are sent back home, and do not factor in at all to local, state or national growth.
Out of all the things people rightfully or wrongly attack St. Louis on, this is a weird one to pick and it's pretty inaccurate. While it's definitely true St. Louis has, by no fault of its own actually (massive deregulation caused the wealth concentration issues in the US), fallen victim to being on the short end of the stick to many M&A's, there's still 10 F500 with their headquarters there. Hardly "a few" when you compare around.
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Old 02-03-2019, 05:41 PM
 
962 posts, read 1,191,646 times
Reputation: 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Big in Millennial culture vs. previous generations:
- Seattle
- Austin
- Portland
- Atlanta
- Houston
- Columbus
- Miami
- Nashville
- NYC (maybe)

Lessened influence in Millennial culture vs. previous generations:
- Chicago
- Cleveland
- St. Louis
- Memphis
- Milwaukee
- LA
- Philadelphia
- Baltimore

Highly correlated with, but not the same as, population growth (e.g. Vegas and Phoenix are growing quickly but don't seem to be developing a lot of cultural presence or celebrities/famous bands)
I was job recruiting at Northwestern and the University of Chicago this week, and the millenials from many parts of the county wanted nothing more than to stay in Chicago. I am positive that LA and Philadelphia are equally attractive to them, and that the culture suits them. Just because you left does not mean others do not want to come. As I recall, you are in Reno, a place that would be the last place I would want to relocate.

In the Chicago example, Millenials have transformed the South and West Loop into boom towns, and places like Edgewater (formerly Uptown) into livable areas with a lively presence. The city is now the most educated because of them. LA and Philly are equally being transformed into something much better because of them.
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