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View Poll Results: Which region has better cities
New England 13 20.63%
Mid Atlantic 50 79.37%
Voters: 63. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-07-2019, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,447 posts, read 994,674 times
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MD DE DC are mid Atlantic. Virginia is southern.
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Old 02-07-2019, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,447 posts, read 994,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
If the only metric is "which has better cities?", how can you possibly vote against the region that has NYC, DC, and Philadelphia? I voted for Mid-Atlantic (though having lived in both regions, I prefer living in New England).

If you want to break it down further, big cities is no contest. NYC, Philly, and DC > Boston.

Mid-size? Baltimore (which is borderline "big"), Pittsburgh, Richmond, Norfolk/VA Beach, Buffalo, Rochester, etc. vs. Providence and Hartford? Again, no real contest.

Small cities is the ONLY area where I can see New England having a case. Portland ME, Burlington VT, Northampton MA, Newport RI, etc. might have more appeal than Annapolis MD, Charlston WV, Albany NY, Charlottesville VA etc. But as the Mid-Atlantic is the much larger geographical and populated area, there's definitely more variety of small cities, so even then I don't know that I would make the case that New England is the best on that front.
Full stop. Baltimore is a BIG city.
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Boston
7,545 posts, read 15,601,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
No one from out of New England is talking about Waterbury and New Bedford let alone visiting.
The Southern New England cities (outside of Boston) don't get the credit they deserve on many fronts. For a LONG time on this forum and in the real world I've pushed New Bedford as being a really, really cool place to visit. I grew up in the area, and it's one of my favorite small cities. I'd live there over Portland ME, Burlington VT, etc. I think Providence still doesn't get the credit it deserves. Lowell, Worcester, New Haven, etc. are all good cities that are worth visiting and even living. Some still kind of suck. I lived in Fall River for 4 years. I have a very soft spot in my heart for it and visit often. But it's a mess. The schools are awful, the mayor is in the midst of a criminal investigation, a former mayor pulled a gun on a city council member (now the aforementioned current mayor under investigation), educational attainment is bad, the economy is bad, etc. The same applies to many small cities in the region. It's not hard to see why a visitor would choose to visit Burlington VT over Taunton MA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Full stop. Baltimore is a BIG city.
It is, and I probably should have put it in there even though it's a tier behind Boston, Philly, and DC, and two tiers behind NYC. It's the 20th largest metro in the country which is why I say "borderline." Because that's about where you start slipping into the midsize category. I think Baltimore's metro numbers are smaller than they could be due to Washington being so close, so it's a little bigger than the metro number would imply. But right after it on that list you start getting into pretty solid mid-size cities.
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Old 02-07-2019, 02:40 PM
 
1,497 posts, read 749,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
How's it hilarious? I would hope the reason is obvious - the criteria for the whole thread is "best cities." These are not the best cities in New England. Each one of them has redeeming qualities and merits, but nobody would lump them in (well, maybe New Haven and Worcester which have a lot of great features) with the best of the region. Nobody says "Going to New England?! You really just HAVE to stop into Nashua!"

Does anybody outside New England say I have to stop in to Burlington, Portland or Northampton? I just need to go to a hipster paradise.
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Old 02-07-2019, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
Does anybody outside New England say I have to stop in to Burlington, Portland or Northampton? I just need to go to a hipster paradise.
The Berkshires, Vermont and Maine are all major tourist draws. Northampton, Burlington, and Portland are the cultural hubs of those regions. So... yes? Those places are all on the top of the list for people visiting those regions.
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Old 02-07-2019, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 27,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
MD DE DC are mid Atlantic. Virginia is southern.
The entire Chesapeake Bay region is southern. However, it is also Mid-Atlantic. Virginia and Maryland are more similar to each other than they are to any other state. They were both settled by British settlers for a similar purpose. Much of Maryland was actually settled by people born in Virginia after its founding. Virginia and Maryland have always been in the same region and always will be. Even if you don't consider them Mid-Atlantic, it is just incorrect to say that they are both in different regions. They are the only two states that have the Chesapeake Bay. The bay has shaped the history of only these two states. No other state has the historical connection that Virginia and Maryland have.

Last edited by Magicstar1; 02-07-2019 at 03:18 PM..
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Old 02-07-2019, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,825 posts, read 1,843,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
People hate southern New England cities. When people talk about the beauty and positives of New England they’re talking about posing iby cities in homogenous ME VT NH-then they’re talking about Downton Boston and Cambridge. The vast majority of Boston and any other Southern New England city are places people don’t even acknowledge-it’s comical really as 11 million of the 14 million people in New England live in Southern New England.

No one from out of New England is talking about Waterbury and New Bedford let alone visiting.
People like Providence and New Haven much more than Manchester.

Also northern cities like Lewiston, Rutland, and Presque Isle get forgotten just as much as southern cities like Pittsfield, Torrington, and Norwich in my experience.
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Old 02-07-2019, 04:40 PM
 
1,753 posts, read 3,297,866 times
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Lots of cities of all sizes in both regions. Mid atlantic is the clear winner on really big cities even without Washington in the lineup as New England has only one of those. There's a lot more territory in the mid-Atlantic-- includes Pittsburgh, Ashtabula, Erie, Buffalo, Rochester and others as well as the more easterly towns like Reading, Allentown, Bethlehem, Newark, Paterson, Trenton, etc. So more cities overall although New England, esp southern NE, has many. Someone did a picture book in the '70s called Gritty Cities which included many of these places-- old manufacturing cities where the industry had mostly moved on. That seems about right to me--they have a lot in common across both regions--rather than asking whether one region has a "better" collection of cities than the other.
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Old 02-07-2019, 09:19 PM
 
8,863 posts, read 9,070,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
The Southern New England cities (outside of Boston) don't get the credit they deserve on many fronts. For a LONG time on this forum and in the real world I've pushed New Bedford as being a really, really cool place to visit. I grew up in the area, and it's one of my favorite small cities. I'd live there over Portland ME, Burlington VT, etc. I think Providence still doesn't get the credit it deserves. Lowell, Worcester, New Haven, etc. are all good cities that are worth visiting and even living. Some still kind of suck. I lived in Fall River for 4 years. I have a very soft spot in my heart for it and visit often. But it's a mess. The schools are awful, the mayor is in the midst of a criminal investigation, a former mayor pulled a gun on a city council member (now the aforementioned current mayor under investigation), educational attainment is bad, the economy is bad, etc. The same applies to many small cities in the region. It's not hard to see why a visitor would choose to visit Burlington VT over Taunton MA.



It is, and I probably should have put it in there even though it's a tier behind Boston, Philly, and DC, and two tiers behind NYC. It's the 20th largest metro in the country which is why I say "borderline." Because that's about where you start slipping into the midsize category. I think Baltimore's metro numbers are smaller than they could be due to Washington being so close, so it's a little bigger than the metro number would imply. But right after it on that list you start getting into pretty solid mid-size cities.
Also New Bedford is he setting for one of the most popular American novels in history.


Also Providence, Salem, Springfield, and New London are famous for whatever reasons.


But really though who knows anything about Winston-Salem, NC or any non-capital/Major DI Collegetown with a metro under 750,000?

Itís insane to think New Bedford, Worcester, Waterbury Pittsfield etc should have a national profile.
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Old 02-07-2019, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,529 posts, read 995,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitek View Post
There's no blended culture in Virginia. Virginia is 100% a southern state. Virginia has ham. Virginia has peanuts. Virginia has a large African-American population and African-American colleges. Virginia has accents. Virginia is extremely rural. There are places where you can drive upon miles and miles and see nothing but a single house. It's slower paced. Virginia still celebrates Confederate History month. Richmond was literally the Capital of the Confederacy; the city is plasted with Confederate statues. There are tons of streets and places named after Confederate soldiers in Northern Virginia. Richmond itself is a majority African-American city and isn't diverse in the slightest. Virginia is literally right beside Kentucky(a southern state) and is virtually identical to North Carolina(another southern state). Virginia has incidents like Charlottesville and now controversy with it's governor. Oddly enough, Southern States Cooperative headquarters are right there in Richmond. Virginia is below the Mason-Dixon line and Census Bureau places Virginia in the south not the Mid Atlantic. Virginia has nothing in common with Pennsylvania or New Jersey. It's southern to it's core.
"Virginia is extremely rural"

Have you been to Virginia in the past 20 years? As a Virginian, this is a laughable post. Virginia isn't the Shenandoah Valley + Appalachia. That entire part of the state fits into 2 Congressional districts.

The vast, vast majority of Virginians are urban living in one of the big 3 metros: Nova, Richmond, Hampton Roads.
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