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View Poll Results: Which region has better cities
New England 13 20.63%
Mid Atlantic 50 79.37%
Voters: 63. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-10-2019, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,447 posts, read 994,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Best cities in New England: Brattleboro, Worcester, Manchester, Augusta

Best cities in the Mid-Atlantic: Charleston (WV), Roanoke, Charlotte, Macon
What?
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Old 02-10-2019, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Baltimore
110 posts, read 27,348 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Best cities in New England: Brattleboro, Worcester, Manchester, Augusta

Best cities in the Mid-Atlantic: Charleston (WV), Roanoke, Charlotte, Macon
Is this the same Charlotte and Macon located in North Carolina and Georgia respectively?
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Old 02-10-2019, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,825 posts, read 1,843,041 times
Reputation: 1534
My favorite Mid Atlantic city is San Francisco
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Old Yesterday, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,039 posts, read 11,364,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
My favorite Mid Atlantic city is San Francisco
Reykjavik is located very close to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, therefore it's the most quintessential Mid-Atlantic city.
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Old Today, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,192 posts, read 48,344,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The Hudson Valley is probably the least New England part of New York outside of NYC proper, due to everything from the old Dutch colonial influence to. It feels its own thing.

The rest of Upstate New York and Long Island were mostly settled by Yankees in the early 19th century though, and do have a very "New England" vibe.
NY is fairly close to New England so it is reasonable that it would have a similar feel.
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Old Today, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,039 posts, read 11,364,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
NY is fairly close to New England so it is reasonable that it would have a similar feel.
But it doesn't. I'm saying that as someone who grew up in Connecticut, went to college in Western Massachusetts, and have spent a fair amount of time in New York over the years.

Most of Upstate NY is very similar to New England, as I said. This is because Upstate was the first stop on the westward migration of New England Yankees in the early 19th century. Cities like Utica, Rome, Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, etc were all founded by Yankees. You can hear this in the accents, and see this in the detached wood-framed house vernacular which is very common throughout the region.

But the Hudson Valley is different. This area was settled by the Dutch prior to England taking over in the 17th century. While the Dutch influence attenuated quickly in New York City, it lingered much longer in the Hudson Valley - particularly because the British did nothing to break up the large dutch-owned plantations. The area has its own unique styles of architecture, such as Dutch Colonial. But more broadly in terms of built environment it just looks more - well - Mid-Atlantic than New England. In old neighborhoods a substantial number of houses are brick, built in rowhouse style, and front directly on the sidewalk. This type of housing is basically completely absent from New England outside of the core of Boston - even in quite old neighborhoods.
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Old Today, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
882 posts, read 544,059 times
Reputation: 1772
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
But it doesn't. I'm saying that as someone who grew up in Connecticut, went to college in Western Massachusetts, and have spent a fair amount of time in New York over the years.

Most of Upstate NY is very similar to New England, as I said. This is because Upstate was the first stop on the westward migration of New England Yankees in the early 19th century. Cities like Utica, Rome, Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, etc were all founded by Yankees. You can hear this in the accents, and see this in the detached wood-framed house vernacular which is very common throughout the region.

But the Hudson Valley is different. This area was settled by the Dutch prior to England taking over in the 17th century. While the Dutch influence attenuated quickly in New York City, it lingered much longer in the Hudson Valley - particularly because the British did nothing to break up the large dutch-owned plantations. The area has its own unique styles of architecture, such as Dutch Colonial. But more broadly in terms of built environment it just looks more - well - Mid-Atlantic than New England. In old neighborhoods a substantial number of houses are brick, built in rowhouse style, and front directly on the sidewalk. This type of housing is basically completely absent from New England outside of the core of Boston - even in quite old neighborhoods.
Additionally, many commercial and residential structures in the Hudson Valley of New York have flat roofs, which is an architectural feature that I never personally observed in New England, but is quite common in the Mid-Atlantic.

Also, given the information you provided about the lingering Dutch influence in the Hudson Valley, it is no surprise that the local accent of that region more closely approximates the accent of New York City than the accents of either western New England, northern New York (i.e., Clinton, Franklin and St. Lawrence Counties) or central New York (e.g., Rome, Syracuse, Utica, etc.).

As you may observe from the map that is linked below, the “Mary-marry-merry” merger is largely absent from the speech patterns of Rockland, Orange and Sullivan Counties, which are certainly located outside of the geographically small New York City accent zone. However, this accent feature occurs throughout western New England and the remainder of upstate New York.

Source: https://www.google.com/search?q=mary...z8YSDCOe3mJgM:
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