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View Poll Results: LA or NYC
NYC 21 46.67%
LA 24 53.33%
Voters: 45. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-05-2019, 01:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frimpter928 View Post
I agree. I see LA having major problems in the future. It's going to have to really add density big time in order to get things in order. Then there is the issue of climate change and water. In truth I can see LA starting to lose population then, and other cities too, like Phoenix.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Do rapidly-growing Western metro areas have a plan for increasing their potable water capacity by 2050 if they all continue growing? Will there be enough water in places like Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver, and Los Angeles? I guess Los Angeles can just invest billions in desalination plants to tap the Pacific Ocean, but Phoenix, Las Vegas, and Denver are growing gang-busters, too.

I have a fear of earthquakes, so Los Angeles would never be a place I'd like to live. With that being said Manhattan might flood much more frequently in 2050 if ocean levels continue to rise.

Can we add Pittsburgh as an option?!
I think water wars will be a thing in the Southwest. Removing the question of climate change and potential droughts, I just don't think there is enough precipitation even at average rainfall totals in the region to sustain the population growth the region is experiencing. LA may try desalination, but with over 20 million in the LA and SD areas, I don't think there could be enough desalination along the coastline without ruining the environment or the beaches themselves being covered in the desalination plants.

The only saving grace for water in the region is if climate change predictions are WRONG, and the region actually starts experiencing MORE rainfall thanks to tropical storms entering the region more often. We've already seen a few creeping up from Mexico and giving LA some summer rain and humidity that it never had before. If that increases, maybe the region can survive. But if the drought predictions are true, there's no way the region survives until 2050 if NV AZ southern Utah and Denver continue growing.

As to your question if any have plans? As far as I know, none do. Residential water caps is about it, but it totally ignores the issue of misuse by wealthy residents who won't follow the caps and the insane amount of water used in CA's farming industry.
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Old 02-05-2019, 01:56 PM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,835 posts, read 11,912,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPt111 View Post
Everything come to end I donít think Amazon will as popular around 2050
This is crazy talk. Major tech companies from 30 years ago like AOL, Compuserve, Prodigy, and Netscape to name a few are still MASSIVE... /sarcasm
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Old 02-05-2019, 01:57 PM
 
832 posts, read 346,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
Do rapidly-growing Western metro areas have a plan for increasing their potable water capacity by 2050 if they all continue growing? Will there be enough water in places like Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver, and Los Angeles? I guess Los Angeles can just invest billions in desalination plants to tap the Pacific Ocean, but Phoenix, Las Vegas, and Denver are growing gang-busters, too.

I have a fear of earthquakes, so Los Angeles would never be a place I'd like to live. With that being said Manhattan might flood much more frequently in 2050 if ocean levels continue to rise.

Can we add Pittsburgh as an option?!
Honestly Chicago should probably fair well in 2050. Easy access to freshwater, infrastructure is in place for more growth with room to grow even within city limits. Rising sea levels won't be a problem for Chicago either. While I am looking to leave Chicago for some time to explore new places, Chicago is an ideal place when it comes to the current state of the natural environment and where things are headed. Droughts, earthquakes, rising sea levels, hurricanes, etc, are not a threat to Chicago. Just the bitter nasty cold, which I would take that over my city getting flooded or not having any water.

Last edited by frimpter928; 02-05-2019 at 02:15 PM..
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Old 02-05-2019, 02:38 PM
 
6,103 posts, read 13,596,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frimpter928 View Post
Honestly Chicago should probably fair well in 2050. Easy access to freshwater, infrastructure is in place for more growth with room to grow even within city limits. Rising sea levels won't be a problem for Chicago either. While I am looking to leave Chicago for some time to explore new places, Chicago is an ideal place when it comes to the current state of the natural environment and where things are headed. Droughts, earthquakes, rising sea levels, hurricanes, etc, are not a threat to Chicago. Just the bitter nasty cold, which I would take that over my city getting flooded or not having any water.
Yeah I think Chicago is going to benefit a lot from this. As for other major cities, I think eventually the Northeast will figure out how to create sufficient seawalls that protect the major urban centers. However, heavily exposed areas will suffer. I.e. a sea wall protecting the New York Bay could protect the most urban parts of the NYC metro, but suburban parts of LI and Jersey shores will suffer. I.e. Boston Harbor can probably protect itself, but places like Cape Cod will be heavily at risk. That said, would Philly potentially be the best-saved Northeast city since it isn't right on the ocean, or would Delaware Bay flooding affect it enough?

Basically, I think there is an easier solution to solving flood problems than drought problems. Look at the Netherlands. NYC was New Amsterdam after all Let's give the name more meaning and model sea walls after Dutch dikes. I think it's easier to stop ocean water from entering a bay with dikes and levees in NYC than it is to magically produce more water for LA.
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Old 02-05-2019, 02:55 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
This is crazy talk. Major tech companies from 30 years ago like AOL, Compuserve, Prodigy, and Netscape to name a few are still MASSIVE... /sarcasm
True, but Apple, Intel, Microsoft, Oracle, and even good olí IBM are all still quite large and some are older than the ones you mentioned. Some of these were already of decent size 30 years ago and are now actually bigger. Also, AOL actually bought Time Warner and then spun off AOL, so Time Warner is actually AOL sort of. Thatís not independent anymore though as AT&T purchased it.
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Old 02-05-2019, 03:08 PM
 
832 posts, read 346,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Yeah I think Chicago is going to benefit a lot from this. As for other major cities, I think eventually the Northeast will figure out how to create sufficient seawalls that protect the major urban centers. However, heavily exposed areas will suffer. I.e. a sea wall protecting the New York Bay could protect the most urban parts of the NYC metro, but suburban parts of LI and Jersey shores will suffer. I.e. Boston Harbor can probably protect itself, but places like Cape Cod will be heavily at risk. That said, would Philly potentially be the best-saved Northeast city since it isn't right on the ocean, or would Delaware Bay flooding affect it enough?

Basically, I think there is an easier solution to solving flood problems than drought problems. Look at the Netherlands. NYC was New Amsterdam after all Let's give the name more meaning and model sea walls after Dutch dikes. I think it's easier to stop ocean water from entering a bay with dikes and levees in NYC than it is to magically produce more water for LA.
I agree. I see the southwest having the most problems. Especially because they also have the fastest growing cities.

I think Philly and DC will be okay. I am not too worried about NYC or Boston either. However, what about Miami in the south? How would creating seawalls impact the beaches? Since that is something Miami relies on as part of their economy.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:10 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frimpter928 View Post
I agree. I see the southwest having the most problems. Especially because they also have the fastest growing cities.

I think Philly and DC will be okay. I am not too worried about NYC or Boston either. However, what about Miami in the south? How would creating seawalls impact the beaches? Since that is something Miami relies on as part of their economy.
Miami and South Florida's larger issue are that the entirety of the area is very flat so it won't take much to submerge the majority of the area, and the water table is quite close to the surface so it's not just water that starts coming from the bay or the ocean, but that in certain places it can start just bubbling up from the ground where ever there's a dip in elevation.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:15 PM
 
832 posts, read 346,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Miami and South Florida's larger issue are that the entirety of the area is very flat so it won't take much to submerge the majority of the area, and the water table is quite close to the surface so it's not just water that starts coming from the bay or the ocean, but that in certain places it can start just bubbling up from the ground where ever there's a dip in elevation.
So essentially, Miami may one day become a real life Atlantis.
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Old 02-05-2019, 04:38 PM
 
6,103 posts, read 13,596,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frimpter928 View Post
So essentially, Miami may one day become a real life Atlantis.
I think if South Florida can manage to politically overcome North Florida by either controlling state government or full on seceding, Miami can be saved. But if it's stuck relying on the Republican-controlled state government, Miami's a goner and it can partly be attributed thick-skulled yet somehow brainwashed retirees voting Republican and not caring about the environment when they're going to die soon anyway and leaving the future generations of Floridians to fix what they created.
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Old 02-05-2019, 06:13 PM
 
483 posts, read 349,682 times
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I'll vote LA. I simply think that LA is having by far the most transformational changes. The growth of its public transportation combined with the coming of both electric cars and driverless vehicles will give a third way to public transportation that is different from NY and distinctly LA, a new model. Downtown is being revitalized, USC and its area is changing, Inglewood is getting better, all good things. I like NY, great city, but its subways are getting worse and so far there is little being done about it. I don't think NYC will be worse, just the same.

People worry about the water usage, I think that with decent management it will fare well. Even Phoenix which is in the middle of the desert can survive, I think LA can definitely manage. Besides, the real user of water in CA is agriculture, not cities, that's a whole other bag of worms.
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