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Old 02-17-2019, 09:21 PM
 
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Well at any rate, looking at the criteria, they weighed heavily on income and poverty rates, both things Durham has traditionally lagged in. The best jobs are in RTP, but most of the workers there live in Wake County because of the schools. Raleigh usually has below average poverty rates and Durham usually has above average poverty rates. It also looks at construction, and no-growth Chapel Hill probably is propping up a Durham that is growing quite a bit slower than Wake. Maybe it sounds weird in a vacuum that the two metros are disjointed as much as the numbers show, but I don’t think it’s a surprise to those living here.

Last edited by Heel82; 02-17-2019 at 09:45 PM..
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Old 02-17-2019, 09:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
Well at any rate, looking at the criteria, they weighed heavily on income, both areas Durham has traditionally lagged in. The best jobs are in RTP, but most of the workers there live in Wake County because of the schools. Raleigh usually has below average poverty rates and Durham usually has above average poverty rates. It also looks at construction, and no-growth Chapel Hill probably is propping up a Durham that is growing quite a bit slower than Wake. Maybe it sounds weird in a vacuum that the two metros are disjointed as much as the numbers show, but I donít think itís a surprise to those living here.
I get it; I know there are definitely differences between both places and they weren't even considered a singular region/metro until RTP was up and running. It's just that this particular ranking takes more factors into consideration and weighs some more heavily than others as you mentioned.
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Old 02-17-2019, 09:43 PM
Status: "Bunch of jerks" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Planet Earth
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Originally Posted by BuffaloHome View Post
The greater Nashville, TN area was ranked as the strongest Metropolitan area economy in the United States in POLICOM’s latest annual community “economic strength” rankings. The area has enjoyed consistent economic growth for a very long time due to its diversified economy.

For the second year in a row, Bozeman, MT ranked number one among the Micropolitan areas as a result of rapid growth in professional services and manufacturing.

POLICOM is an independent economics research firm which specializes in analyzing the dynamics of local and state economies. Each year, the firm ranks the 383 Metropolitan Statistical Areas and 551 Micropolitan Statistical Areas in the U.S. for “economic strength” — the long-term tendency for an area to consistently grow in both size and quality.

“The top rated areas have had rapid, consistent growth in both size and quality for an extended period of time,” explained William H. Fruth, President of POLICOM. “The rankings do not reflect the latest ‘hotspot’ or boom town, but the areas which have the best economic foundation.”


2019 Ten Strongest Metropolitan Areas (Out of 383)
  1. Nashville TN
  2. Seattle WA
  3. Austin TX
  4. San Jose CA
  5. Napa CA
  6. Salt Lake City UT
  7. San Diego CA
  8. Indianapolis IN
  9. Raleigh NC
  10. Atlanta GA

2019 Ten Strongest Micropolitan Areas (Out of 551)
  1. Bozeman MT
  2. Summit Park UT
  3. Lewisburg PA
  4. Hood River OR
  5. Wooster OH
  6. Breckenridge CO
  7. Edwards CO
  8. Eureka CA
  9. Oxford MS
  10. Ellensburg WA
https://businessfacilities.com/2019/...ength-ranking/
Good to see a town in Mississippi make this list, that state could use some good news. Hope to visit Oxford one day, they're on my college football bucket list.
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Old 02-17-2019, 09:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I get it; I know there are definitely differences between both places and they weren't even considered a singular region/metro until RTP was up and running. It's just that this particular ranking takes more factors into consideration and weighs some more heavily than others as you mentioned.
Perhaps. But I canít really say Iíve ever seen Durham in the top 10-20 except in really specific areas or unless itís lumped in with Raleigh.
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Old 02-17-2019, 10:26 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Clearly there's issue with the methodology when an example of Raleigh at #9 and neighboring Durham-Chapel at #65 exists. Especially considering the primary driving force in the region's economy (Research Triangle Park) is located mostly within the city/county limits of Durham, versus Raleigh.
Just a point of clarification. RTP is not in the city limits of Durham. Yes, the larger part of RTP is in Durham County, but state law prevents a city from annexing it. Two other points: 1) While RTP has been a driving force for decades, more activity is moving toward both Raleigh and Durham. 2) The developed Wake County side of RTP has probably seen its percentage of economic impact oversized relative to its footprint in more recent decades.
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Old 02-18-2019, 01:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
Perhaps. But I canít really say Iíve ever seen Durham in the top 10-20 except in really specific areas or unless itís lumped in with Raleigh.
In the latest Forbes "Best cities for business and careers" list, Raleigh is #2 and Durham is #13: https://www.forbes.com/best-places-for-business/list/ In lots of earlier Forbes rankings, they've been even closer.

Here's another and it even ranks ahead of Raleigh and Charlotte on this list: https://wallethub.com/edu/best-citie...business/2281/
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Old 02-18-2019, 03:51 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
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Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Just a point of clarification. RTP is not in the city limits of Durham. Yes, the larger part of RTP is in Durham County, but state law prevents a city from annexing it. Two other points: 1) While RTP has been a driving force for decades, more activity is moving toward both Raleigh and Durham. 2) The developed Wake County side of RTP has probably seen its percentage of economic impact oversized relative to its footprint in more recent decades.
I was a little confused by this, as I recall seeing signs on I-85 when I went down to Durham summer before last for a family reunion reading "City and County of Durham", which led me to believe the two were one and the same (like Philadelphia in Pennsylvania or San Francisco in California).

A little Web-surfing reveals that they aren't - but that Durham County has only one incorporated municipality in it, the City of Durham, pieces of which lie in neighboring counties. Similarly, a piece of the City of Raleigh, in Wake County, lies within Durham County, as do pieces of the incorporated towns of Chapel Hill, in Orange County, and Morrisville, in Wake County.

And the bulk of Durham County's population lives in Durham City.

What township (administrative unit rather than municipal government) is RTP located in?
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Old 02-18-2019, 08:18 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
I was a little confused by this, as I recall seeing signs on I-85 when I went down to Durham summer before last for a family reunion reading "City and County of Durham", which led me to believe the two were one and the same (like Philadelphia in Pennsylvania or San Francisco in California).

A little Web-surfing reveals that they aren't - but that Durham County has only one incorporated municipality in it, the City of Durham, pieces of which lie in neighboring counties. Similarly, a piece of the City of Raleigh, in Wake County, lies within Durham County, as do pieces of the incorporated towns of Chapel Hill, in Orange County, and Morrisville, in Wake County.

And the bulk of Durham County's population lives in Durham City.

What township (administrative unit rather than municipal government) is RTP located in?
RTP is, in effect, its own thing. The state set it up that way all those years ago. It straddles both Durham and Wake Counties in a 65/35 or 70/30 split (Durham over Wake).
Durham officials have tried in vain over the years to incorporate it into the city. Because Durham couldn't, the city annexed the land surrounding "the Park". So, traversing I40, you immediately leave Durham city before entering RTP, but there's no sign saying that you are leaving the city limits. Some states have such signs, but I've never seen them in NC. Coming from Raleigh, you enter Durham County before you hit the actual limits of RTP, thus the sign that says entering the city and county of Durham. IMO, Durham officials want you to think that the Park is in its city limits, thus branding the city to the Park. They want people to say that the Park is in Durham; it's intentional. Because the city and county have the same name, it's rather convenient too.
If you look at the history of the Triangle, and the growth that resulted from the formation of RTP, it's very easy to see that it influenced its eastern half (Raleigh), far more than its western half (Durham). Much of this can be attributed to the fact that IBM was already in Raleigh before it moved to RTP in the 1960s. It's also arguable that Raleigh did a better early job of hitching its wagon to the Park's engine in the first few decades. The growth numbers tell the story.

In 1960, Durham City had 78,302 people. In 2017, it had 267,743 (+189,441)
In 1960, Durham County had 111,995 people. In 2017, it had 311,640 (+199,645)

In 1960, Raleigh City had 93,931 people. In 2017, it had 464,758 (+370,827)
In 1960, Wake County had 169,082 people. In 2017, it had 1,072,203 (+903,121)

Wake is certainly a larger county, and some of the outsized Triangle growth can be attributed to that, but the Raleigh city limits alone grew by nearly twice the entire county of Durham since 1960. Each year, Wake County puts more and more distance on Durham County. Given that momentum alone, it shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone that Raleigh's economic strength leads Durham's.
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Old 02-18-2019, 08:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
In the latest Forbes "Best cities for business and careers" list, Raleigh is #2 and Durham is #13: https://www.forbes.com/best-places-for-business/list/ In lots of earlier Forbes rankings, they've been even closer.

Here's another and it even ranks ahead of Raleigh and Charlotte on this list: https://wallethub.com/edu/best-citie...business/2281/
Thanks. Just a cursory look, it looks like they are saying a Durham has (relatively) cheap labor costs and a large college educated populace to go with the statewide business-friendly regulations. Iíd agree with that and hopefully they can start getting traction in other areas.
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Old 02-18-2019, 11:57 AM
 
Location: North Bronx
347 posts, read 260,181 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
In the latest Forbes "Best cities for business and careers" list, Raleigh is #2 and Durham is #13: https://www.forbes.com/best-places-for-business/list/ In lots of earlier Forbes rankings, they've been even closer.

Here's another and it even ranks ahead of Raleigh and Charlotte on this list: https://wallethub.com/edu/best-citie...business/2281/
Bull City even though it has its challenges its doing very well in many respects and punches well above its weight on the economic front always enjoy my time there when I visit family
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