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View Poll Results: Which is better?
Birmingham 22 36.67%
New Orleans 23 38.33%
Memphis 15 25.00%
Voters: 60. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-15-2019, 11:52 AM
 
180 posts, read 49,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
It depends on what someone is looking for and what they consider livable. What about Birmingham comes off as more livable to you? Just curious. Not trying to say you're wrong lol
Hey, good question. The suburbs in Birmingham seemed to be little more well kept than the other 2 choices. Traffic didn't seem as bad as New Orleans. A lot of that to me is cost relative. I think in B Ham, I could just get more. I would also not live in the city of Birmingham as someone said. Homewood, Vestivia Hills, Mountain Brook. I had a friend who lived in Chelsea and it seemed like a nice area. The region seems to be pretty decentralized which I understand could be a knock for some. OP mentioned shopping in which case I think Birmingham wins, and scenery which is subjective but I prefer the sharp hills and bluffs of bham over the water.

Livability is mostly subjective and I love the idea of living in New Orleans. It seems to be more consolidated and it does indeed have more culture and a ton of great amenities. Id love to be able to live in a place where I could bike more, and it seems like New Orleans may fit that in certain areas. However, traffic seemed worse to me, it was very touristy, and Looking at average rents, it appears to be more expensive. I can't say this for sure since Ive never lived in NO.

I like New Orleans more than BHam, but I think I would rather live in B Ham.

New Orleans is absolutely one of my favorite cities and one of the most unique in the country. So much history in the region. It takes culture for sure. Potentially future outlook too. I think that category can be hard to quantify in the case of these 3 cities. There doesn't seem to be a clear growth leader such as a Charlotte or Atlanta or something.

I also like Memphis, except for me New Orleans seems like a wayyyy better version of Memphis. As far as historic cities on the Mississippi are concerned.
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Old 02-15-2019, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,622 posts, read 3,666,332 times
Reputation: 3276
Quote:
Originally Posted by kombuchaluchador View Post
Hey, good question. The suburbs in Birmingham seemed to be little more well kept than the other 2 choices. Traffic didn't seem as bad as New Orleans. A lot of that to me is cost relative. I think in B Ham, I could just get more. I would also not live in the city of Birmingham as someone said. Homewood, Vestivia Hills, Mountain Brook. I had a friend who lived in Chelsea and it seemed like a nice area. The region seems to be pretty decentralized which I understand could be a knock for some. OP mentioned shopping in which case I think Birmingham wins, and scenery which is subjective but I prefer the sharp hills and bluffs of bham over the water.

Livability is mostly subjective and I love the idea of living in New Orleans. It seems to be more consolidated and it does indeed have more culture and a ton of great amenities. Id love to be able to live in a place where I could bike more, and it seems like New Orleans may fit that in certain areas. However, traffic seemed worse to me, it was very touristy, and Looking at average rents, it appears to be more expensive. I can't say this for sure since Ive never lived in NO.

I like New Orleans more than BHam, but I think I would rather live in B Ham.

New Orleans is absolutely one of my favorite cities and one of the most unique in the country. So much history in the region. It takes culture for sure. Potentially future outlook too. I think that category can be hard to quantify in the case of these 3 cities. There doesn't seem to be a clear growth leader such as a Charlotte or Atlanta or something.

I also like Memphis, except for me New Orleans seems like a wayyyy better version of Memphis. As far as historic cities on the Mississippi are concerned.
I agree. Birmingham has awesome suburbs. Upscale homes and shopping with easy access to the insterstate. I would choose Birmingham area to live. Memphis is falling further behind its peers. Memphis does have an interesting history and vibe though.
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Jack-town, Sip by way of AL and FL
829 posts, read 485,955 times
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Economy? None much different than the others
Future outlook? Hard to say any are any better or worse
Shopping? Any city has plenty of this
Culture? New Orleans, duh
Growth? I would say Memphis most likely, seems the climate is better there, better logistics
Scenery? Birmingham due to the mountains
Education? Birmingham only due to UAB
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,295 posts, read 619,610 times
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Just regarding the suburban options - I think Memphis is pretty competitive with Birmingham. Germantown and Collierville are very affluent, clean and aesthetically attractive communities, and nearby areas in the city of Memphis around Poplar Avenue are similar, aside from the older built environment. The Birmingham suburbs do have the scenic advantage as far as hillier terrain, but metro Memphis is easier to navigate. Probably a key difference is that Memphis has a larger population living in economically distressed, urban core or inner suburban areas than Birmingham does.

New Orleans' immediate suburbs, south of Lake Pontchartrain, tend to be densely developed with much less green space than around most metro areas in the South. Jefferson Parish which is most of this area lacks the charm and character of the urban core but shares its congestion and aging infrastructure ... and that doesn't even begin to address the environmental vulnerabilities with being below sea level in an area at risk of tropical storms. The outlying suburbs of St. Tammany Parish north of the lake have a more typical built environment for the Southern US but are at a large distance from the central city.
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Old 02-15-2019, 02:06 PM
 
6,168 posts, read 13,632,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
Just regarding the suburban options - I think Memphis is pretty competitive with Birmingham. Germantown and Collierville are very affluent, clean and aesthetically attractive communities, and nearby areas in the city of Memphis around Poplar Avenue are similar, aside from the older built environment. The Birmingham suburbs do have the scenic advantage as far as hillier terrain, but metro Memphis is easier to navigate. Probably a key difference is that Memphis has a larger population living in economically distressed, urban core or inner suburban areas than Birmingham does.

New Orleans' immediate suburbs, south of Lake Pontchartrain, tend to be densely developed with much less green space than around most metro areas in the South. Jefferson Parish which is most of this area lacks the charm and character of the urban core but shares its congestion and aging infrastructure ... and that doesn't even begin to address the environmental vulnerabilities with being below sea level in an area at risk of tropical storms. The outlying suburbs of St. Tammany Parish north of the lake have a more typical built environment for the Southern US but are at a large distance from the central city.
See to me, though, living in a place like Metairie would be a more preferable option. I still hate the suburbs and wouldn't voluntarily live there. And I get that it shares many of the problems with New Orleans as a whole. However, having such easy access to New Orleans would be the major selling feature for me. There is way more to do in New Orleans than Memphis. And Birmingham has a lot, but it's not the same as NoLa. Being able to be in the city any time I wanted would be great.
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Old 02-15-2019, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the lower 48.
235 posts, read 202,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippi Alabama Line View Post
Education? Birmingham only due to UAB
I would put Tulane ahead of UAB.
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Old 02-15-2019, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,686 posts, read 6,300,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuffaloHome View Post
I would put Tulane ahead of UAB.
Depends.When it comes to healthcare UAB has the leg up.
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Old 02-15-2019, 05:05 PM
Status: "I Gotta Feelin'" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,322 posts, read 8,483,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
Memphis is falling further behind its peers. Memphis does have an interesting history and vibe though.

All 3 cities are relatively poor and do not stack up well nationally against cities similar to them.

How is Memphis falling further behind its peers, when it has a ton of development/redevelopment happening currently?
I would argue it is well ahead of both New Orleans and Birmingham, in terms of new projects on the table or currently under development.

Memphis Boom of $4 billion in projects for downtown alone, as of Dec 2018:
https://www.bizjournals.com/memphis/...-downtown.html

https://www.constructiondive.com/new...n-2018/546339/

Memphis saw $1.3 billion in construction permits in 2018:
https://www.constructiondive.com/new...n-2018/546339/

It is actually Birmingham that is lagging far behind its peers. Birmingham's issue is similar to Memphis, in that it has a wounded civil rights past and has never fully been able to move on. Also, it's economy is not diversified enough.

Birmingham lagging behind:
https://birminghamwatch.org/birmingh...th-study-says/

As for New Orleans, it is a decent yet poor city that relies on a helluva lot of tourist dollars (as does Memphis) for business. However, this article sheds some positive light on New Orleans' economic future:

New Orleans stronger than anticipated:
https://www.theadvocate.com/new_orle...2949498b2.html

I think I've mentioned in a couple posts that the state of Tennessee is aggressive with luring jobs and economic growth to its cities. The new governor of Tennessee has vowed to close the inequality economic gap between Nashville and Memphis. I think he is committed to this and I think Memphis is in for a very strong future.

Last edited by jjbradleynyc; 02-15-2019 at 06:07 PM..
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Old 02-15-2019, 06:24 PM
 
28,670 posts, read 25,931,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PortCity View Post
Depends.When it comes to healthcare UAB has the leg up.
NOLA has a more robust collection of colleges and universities overall.
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Old 02-15-2019, 06:35 PM
 
28,670 posts, read 25,931,180 times
Reputation: 17216
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
How is Memphis falling further behind its peers, when it has a ton of development/redevelopment happening currently?
I would argue it is well ahead of both New Orleans and Birmingham, in terms of new projects on the table or currently under development.

Memphis Boom of $4 billion in projects for downtown alone, as of Dec 2018:
https://www.bizjournals.com/memphis/...-downtown.html

https://www.constructiondive.com/new...n-2018/546339/

Memphis saw $1.3 billion in construction permits in 2018:
https://www.constructiondive.com/new...n-2018/546339/

It is actually Birmingham that is lagging far behind its peers. Birmingham's issue is similar to Memphis, in that it has a wounded civil rights past and has never fully been able to move on. Also, it's economy is not diversified enough.

Birmingham lagging behind:
https://birminghamwatch.org/birmingh...th-study-says/
You're being inconsistent with your bases of comparison. If you're arguing that Memphis isn't falling behind due to how much investment is occurring in its downtown, then you can say the same for Birmingham. If you want to use economic metrics to determine who is lagging, then you have to include Memphis's metrics along with Birmingham's and NOLA's.
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