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Old Yesterday, 04:30 PM
 
179 posts, read 72,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
The interesting part is that the Indian population in Chicago and San Jose are growing at the same super fast rate(20% in five years is stunning), it's just that SF-Oakland's Indian population is actually growing at twice that rate, which is astounding, and will likely surpass Chicago by itself very soon.
Is there any place in SF-Oakland or San Jose that has a "Little India" like Devon Avenue in Chicago or Jackson Heights in Queens, or are they equally spread around out there? Or like Chinatown in SF? It seems like most of the South Asian growth out there is mostly recent so there aren't very many multi-generational areas yet.
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Old Yesterday, 06:25 PM
 
Location: New York, N.Y.
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The Indian population is SF CSA is highly transient. H1B1 etc. with legal changes to these types of Visas I wonder if the number will drop there. Populations in NY and Chicago are older and more established.
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Old Yesterday, 06:35 PM
 
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When I was growing up, it felt like Chicago was solidly number two, behind the New York/New Jersey area. Chicago’s South Asian community is older than many other metros, especially compared to the Bay Area. Many of them immigrated from the late 60s to the 80s. On the whole, many of the earlier immigrants were Gujarati. Many Sourh Asian families in the Chicago area are already onto the 3rd generation by now.

The Bay area’s South Asian population was minuscule up until the tech boom. The Bay Area South Asian community is much more recently arrived, and are of mostly South Indian origin.


New York is so big that you will find a mixture of older immigrants from the 60’s and 70’s all the way up to brand new and everything in between. New York is also different in that they have South Asians that formed diasporas in other parts of the world (Guyana, Trinidad, Fiji, etc) before immigrating to America. These people are twice removed from India.
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Old Yesterday, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
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Are we including Canada? Because Vancouver....
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Old Yesterday, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mraza9 View Post
The Indian population is SF CSA is highly transient. H1B1 etc. with legal changes to these types of Visas I wonder if the number will drop there. Populations in NY and Chicago are older and more established.
Im sorry but nearly 10% of an entire metro area is quite a bit more 'noticeable' imo than a few inner city neighborhoods imo.
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Old Yesterday, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Are we including Canada? Because Vancouver....
Vancouverís South Asian community is extremely non-diverse. Itís almost all Punjabi.
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Old Yesterday, 08:31 PM
 
Location: New York, N.Y.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Im sorry but nearly 10% of an entire metro area is quite a bit more 'noticeable' imo than a few inner city neighborhoods imo.
Who needs metro areas when the borough of Queens is 10% south Asian and a good mix of Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi? Urban deep rooted and historic south Asian neighborhoods, like youíll find in London or Singapore or Toronto. You can take your 10% H1B1 South Indian tech workers who will likely be gone in a few years when their visas expire. But I digress.
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Old Yesterday, 08:38 PM
 
179 posts, read 72,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nap1313 View Post
When I was growing up, it felt like Chicago was solidly number two, behind the New York/New Jersey area. Chicago’s South Asian community is older than many other metros, especially compared to the Bay Area. Many of them immigrated from the late 60s to the 80s. On the whole, many of the earlier immigrants were Gujarati. Many Sourh Asian families in the Chicago area are already onto the 3rd generation by now.

The Bay area’s South Asian population was minuscule up until the tech boom. The Bay Area South Asian community is much more recently arrived, and are of mostly South Indian origin.


New York is so big that you will find a mixture of older immigrants from the 60’s and 70’s all the way up to brand new and everything in between. New York is also different in that they have South Asians that formed diasporas in other parts of the world (Guyana, Trinidad, Fiji, etc) before immigrating to America. These people are twice removed from India.
Yeah, I grew up thinking Chicago was #2 for South Asians in the US, and #3 in North America overall after NYC/New Jersey and Toronto. I don't think there's a "Little India" in the Bay Area like there is in Chicago and the NY area, or even something equivalent to SF Chinatown there. Every time I see advertisements on Desi TV, I never see places in SF advertised, but places in NYC, Chicago and Toronto are.

But even without that, it's impressive how much the Desi population has entrenched themselves in the Bay in the last 20 years. And unlike other American metros, there is a huge South Indian portion there that isn't as present in other cities except Toronto (who have a ton of Tamil refugees from Sri Lanka).

Let's see if they become a long standing community there. I have a feeling by 2020, they will be the 2nd largest Asian group there.

Quote:
Are we including Canada? Because Vancouver....
I was intending to keep this to the US, but Canada talk is ok. Vancouver is a huge South Asian center, but again, its mostly Sikh Punjabi. For one reason or another, other Desi groups haven't been attracted there like they have with Toronto.
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Old Yesterday, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,651 posts, read 53,955,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mraza9 View Post
Who needs metro areas when the borough of Queens is 10% south Asian and a good mix of Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi?
Not according to the census bureau, and this thread isnt about New York.

Quote:
Urban deep rooted and historic south Asian neighborhoods, like you’ll find in London or Singapore or Toronto.
Congrats but this thread isnt about that at all.

It's about noticeable influence and you dont influence if you only stick to your ethnic neighborhood.

Quote:
You can take your 10% H1B1 South Indian tech workers who will likely be gone in a few years when their visas expire. But I digress.
Until then, nearly 10% of the San Jose Metro Area is Asian Indian vs 2% for the Chicago Metro.

Indians are 5x more visible in San Jose than in Chicago.

They are not in the shadows but leaders here.

Think about that.
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Old Yesterday, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,543 posts, read 18,388,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Until then, nearly 10% of the San Jose Metro Area is Asian Indian vs 2% for the Chicago Metro.

Indians are 5x more visible in San Jose than in Chicago.

5x more visible in statistics. Visibility in the actual real world away from on paper statistics is a lot more complicated and has a lot more factors than this. Not saying one is more visible than the others, but you have completely over simplified it. I could say there's way more Indian people in Dallas than Des Moines, IA but it doesn't mean that every corner of Dallas automatically has Indian people visible just because the entire place has more. That's an extremely naive way to look at things.

Things like geographic integration vs. segregation of the population, businesses, etc has a lot more to do with it than one blanket statistic. I think the Bay Area is #2 in the country for all of this, don't get me wrong, but most of us are way over simplifying how to actually measure influence. Having a big population doesn't mean they're influential either in a place where they are a minority - and neither does having a smaller but sizable population. I mean look at the East Village in Manhattan - tons of Japanese things there - stores, restaurants, bars, etc - yet barely any Japanese people actually live in that area but it has a big influence on the area way more than the actual populations that live there.

So for me if you're talking about Indian, Pakistani, etc - or any other population - and its influence then it goes beyond population in the areas where they are. How many restaurants, stores, markets, etc specifically for these countries exist in areas without much of the population living there (i.e are there Indian, Pakistani, etc restaurants, stores, etc in areas where they don't even live)? How prevalent are Indian, Pakistani, etc celebrations in spaces (bars, clubs, parks, etc) that have nothing to normally do with the populations? These types of things to me have to do with actual influence. Having someone from country X living somewhere doesn't mean they are having any influence on the rest of the place they are living in. Really naive way of looking at things IMO.

Last edited by marothisu; Yesterday at 10:28 PM..
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