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Old 02-20-2019, 04:10 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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There is way more history, architecture, museums, restaurants, neighborhoods and just things going on with some interesting, friendly folks and none of that New England provincialism in Philly.

Boston is a fine and interesting city, with all the above mentioned there to see and experience. Now, all the more so with the transformative Rose Kennedy Greenway - a true jewel of the city.

But it still can’t stand up to Philly.
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Old 02-20-2019, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
There is way more history, architecture, museums, restaurants, neighborhoods and just things going on with some interesting, friendly folks and none of that New England provincialism in Philly.
Uhhh...source, please?
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
I'm completely in agreement with all those who labeled Boston and Philadelphia great cities. And I fully understand their being conflated as these two, more than any other, represent that colonial era coming of age and coming into its own leading to the revolution and the new nation era.

From Faneuil Hall and Paul Revere's house in Boston to Philadelphia's Independence Hall and Liberty Bell, the two are steeped in history.

Which one would I give the nod to (and it is a slight nod as they are close in what they offer): Boston. Why? It seems to me that history has "stuck" more in Boston than in Philly. Philadelphia grew far larger than Boston, so I do think that Boston is closer to its "roots".
Philly grew far larger than Boston because it annexed 132 square miles of land. It doesn't have much of anything to do with population, besides maybe, Philadelphia being more in New York's shadow.
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Old 02-20-2019, 08:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
There is way more history, architecture, museums, restaurants, neighborhoods and just things going on with some interesting, friendly folks and none of that New England provincialism in Philly.

Boston is a fine and interesting city, with all the above mentioned there to see and experience. Now, all the more so with the transformative Rose Kennedy Greenway - a true jewel of the city.

But it still canít stand up to Philly.
You're right about the provincialism. Overall, the citizens of Boston are undoubtedly more proud of their city, and do I dare say snobby. This has more to do with status and money than the region of New England though. New York and San Francisco are 2 cities I can come up with right off the top of my head that are undoubtedly more snobby and proud of their city than Bostonians.
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Old 02-22-2019, 06:24 AM
 
1,772 posts, read 3,322,652 times
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Originally Posted by Packerguy View Post
American History, Architecture, and museums. I been to both cities once and loved them, but I can’t decide which one I should go back too. I know they both also had great neighborhoods to see.
There’s Architecture and architecture. The former is well represented in both cities— e.g., Boston has Richardson and Philadelphia has Furness; Boston has a lot of I. M. Pei and some Paul Rudolph; Philadelphia has Louis Kahn. For the latter Philly has infinite rowhouse neighborhoods; Boston has a few but quickly transitions to wood frame. Sometimes the wood frame is as nice or nicer to see than the rowhouses. Boston’s winding streets make driving a headache but walking more pleasurable than the gridiron streets of Phila and so many other American cities. Boston has lots of water, fresh and salt, and plenty of public space alongside to enjoy it. Philly has the Delaware and the Schuykill and all those wonderful paintings by Eakins of men in sculls; and then you can walk along the Schuykill and see the contemporary versions. Independence National Historical Park is more of a cultural production than Boston’s freedom trail; they tore down all the less historic buildings in the vicinity and made it something of a theme park. In Boston you wander through the city streets and come upon historic sites in all their vernacular context (except for Faneuil Hall where they have torn down pretty much everything around it and either built new or renovated the bejesus out of older buildings.) Boston has its harbor and harbor islands; nothing like that in Philadelphia. 30 years ago Digby Baltzell gave the edge to Philadelphia in art. The Art Museum, the Penna Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Barnes are hard to beat. But in Boston don’t count out Cambridge and the MIT museum and Harvard Art Museums.

Last edited by missionhill; 02-22-2019 at 07:33 AM..
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Old 02-22-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Originally Posted by missionhill View Post
There’s Architecture and architecture. The former is well represented in both cities— e.g., Boston has Richardson and Philadelphia has Furness; Boston has a lot of I. M. Pei and some Paul Rudolph; Philadelphia has Louis Kahn. For the latter Philly has infinite rowhouse neighborhoods; Boston has a few but quickly transitions to wood frame. Sometimes the wood frame is as nice or nicer to see than the rowhouses. Boston’s winding streets make driving a headache but walking more pleasurable than the gridiron streets of Phila and so many other American cities. Boston has lots of water, fresh and salt, and plenty of public space alongside to enjoy it. Philly has the Delaware and the Schuykill and all those wonderful paintings by Eakins of men in sculls; and then you can walk along the Schuykill and see the contemporary versions. Independence National Historical Park is more of a cultural production than Boston’s freedom trail; they tore down all the less historic buildings in the vicinity and made it something of a theme park. In Boston you wander through the city streets and come upon historic sites in all their vernacular context (except for Faneuil Hall where they have torn down pretty much everything around it and either built new or renovated the bejesus out of older buildings.) Boston has its harbor and harbor islands; nothing like that in Philadelphia. 30 years ago Digby Baltzell gave the edge to Philadelphia in art. The Art Museum, the Penna Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Barnes are hard to beat. But in Boston don’t count out Cambridge and the MIT museum and Harvard Art Museums.
Great post/synopsis.

I'd have to say that as far as "walking" cities go, both are of course top flight for pedestrian experience, and probably can flip a coin as for "preference."

I'd agree that Boston's urban form/layout is extremely unique as far as US cities go, and there being the lack of a street grid does add to the pedestrian intrigue. That being said, the average "tightness" of Philly's streets over a larger stretch of its core, in addition to having being somewhat more architecturally "eclectic" as compared to Boston, lends to an equally unique and intriguing/pleasant pedestrian experience in the City of Brotherly Love from my experience--just in a different way.
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Old 02-24-2019, 01:50 PM
 
526 posts, read 129,717 times
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
overall to me they are comparably sized; maybe Philly a tad bigger. Probably a few more historic buildings etc and a few more history museums I believe (probably very similar on other museums). Society Hill is a little bigger than Beacon Hill. North end ~ the size of Old City etc.


Honestly for their DTs I think the number of things to do are about as similar as two cities get.


On the temps here is my take as someone that has been traveling to Boston for work and leisure for 20 years and through all seasons. over that time probably average 8+ times a year


Winter - there is a significant difference albeit not huge. Philly is definitely milder in the winter. Its fall lasts longer and spring comes sooner (collectively maybe 45 more days combined). That said Philly has 45 more days of oppressive heat and humidity that I rarely find in Boston. Philly can be easily 96 with high humidity many days; in Boston they are much more rare


For whatever reason places like NYC (nearly identical weather to Philly) and DC are much more temperate (also way hotter in the summer) than Boston which to me feels more like Chicago. All are bearable but Boston is notable colder and snowier in the winter and not as hot (to me not a bad thing because 96 HHH in the city can be nasty)


to the OP; is there anything that you have not seen in either that you truly want to? that may help make the choice (both sound like great options for what you are looking for)


It sounds like you haven't been in a while; there are three newer museums in Philly including the National Constitution Center, National Museum of the American Revolution, and the National Museum of Jewish American History that have all opened up in the last 10 years or so


one other thing; if you enjoy Art the Barnes foundation moved their museum to the parkway (from the main line) next to the Rodin Museum which is the largest private collection museum in the US and largest collection of impressionist art outside of Paris and worth a visit
Husband is a history buff and said Constitution Center is a great visit . . . content rich. As far as architecture, check out boat house row and art museum.
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Old 02-24-2019, 02:05 PM
 
526 posts, read 129,717 times
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Originally Posted by Packerguy View Post
I know thereís probably been other threads about these cities, but Iím not interested in living in them. I just want to know which out of two I should go back too and visit for 3 nights or so. Iím really interested in American History, Architecture, and museums. I been to both cities once and loved them, but I canít decide which I should go back too. I know they both also had great neighborhoods to see.
You might find the link below helpful -- MA has more historic listings than PA but Philadelphia has more than Boston.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...laces_listings
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Old 03-03-2019, 07:13 AM
 
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What other neighborhoods outside of Society Hill and Downtown Philadelphia have beautiful row housing?
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Old 03-03-2019, 04:42 PM
 
Location: The City
22,223 posts, read 31,520,768 times
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Originally Posted by Packerguy View Post
What other neighborhoods outside of Society Hill and Downtown Philadelphia have beautiful row housing?


depends on the person


Society Hill
Old City
Washington West
Queen Village
Fitler Square
Logan Square (more spotty by some nice)
Bella Vista
East Passyunk
Art Museum
Fairmont
Many parts of U City (multiple neighborhoods)
Rittenhouse




Parts of North and West Philly has some excellent structures though many have seen their better days


plus numerous others


Now there is also a lot of just ok or not nice rowhouses


just the neighborhoods I listed above have probably 250-300K people maybe more
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