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Old 02-24-2019, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Miami, The Magic City
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In that case, vs “new” city would seem to be appropriate—which is a category all but NYC and Chicago would seem to fall in...who else in US??...SF??..NOLA??.. (unaware of artsy neighborhoods or events that attract a worldwide following in older cities, such as Boston, Philly, etc—please advise if such is the case).

Most cities are undergoing new construction/expansion ...who else is developing new or modern transportation innovation/expansion??

Not sure I agree with LA “lagging behind”. Cities, including NYC (Bowery, Hudson Yards, Williamsburg, Battery Park, etc), constantly reinvent themselves.

Unless I’m missing the point of the post.

Last edited by elchevere; 02-24-2019 at 12:50 PM..
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Old 02-24-2019, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Terramaria
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Baltimore comes to mind with its lack of quality infrastructure investment, managerial tactics to lure contemporary companies, funding for important services like schools and police, and the general "paranoid" vibe that the city seems to endure. Parts of the city sadly resemble DC's ungentrified neighborhoods back in the '80s. Of course, there hasn't been any major transit upgrades since the early '90s, which when Baltimore was last in tune with the times IMO. A lot of those rehabbed "condos" downtown turn out to be "guarded quarters" with the ground-level vibrancy not improving, and in some cases, declining. I recently read that thread about that New Yorker relocating with his "old and sad" for descriptors like Charlotte, Atlanta, SF, etc, but honestly, Baltimore is the real deal with that term. Even cities like Pittsburgh, Detroit (slow but steady gentrification) and St. Louis (Better Together) show better incentives to move forward.
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Old 02-24-2019, 02:30 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Seems like it’s going to be an “Urban City vs Sunbelt City” type of thread.
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Old 02-24-2019, 05:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elchevere View Post

Not sure I agree with LA “lagging behind”. Cities, including NYC (Bowery, Hudson Yards, Williamsburg, Battery Park, etc), constantly reinvent themselves.

Unless I’m missing the point of the post.
I don’t agree with LA either. Rail transit is “behind” but not because the city is lagging behind. LA adapts to the times. It had an extensive rail system at the turn of the last century. Cars become popular, so they paved over it. Now cars are congesting the streets since the 90s, so they’re back to building rail again.

But cities are always falling behind in infrastructure. NYC’s subway system is still running on 100 years old technology.
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Old 02-24-2019, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Miami, The Magic City
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Yeah...agree about transit and yet then they also developed the Oculus (Mall / station) and added a new subway line—but, yeah, definitely in need of other updated infrastructure...Penn Station, airports, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by savvysearch View Post
I don’t agree with LA either. Rail transit is “behind” but not because the city is lagging behind. LA adapts to the times. It had an extensive rail system at the turn of the last century. Cars become popular, so they paved over it. Now cars are congesting the streets since the 90s, so they’re back to building rail again.

But cities are always falling behind in infrastructure. NYC’s subway system is still running on 100 years old technology.
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Old 02-24-2019, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elchevere View Post
Yup...not sure how Miami got lumped into this as well—not with the recent rollout of modern Brightline rail system, continued dredging and expansion of the world’s busiest cruise ship port, expansion/renovation of the Miami Beach Convention Center, addressing of flooding with city wide pumps, and continued major development from Coconut Grove to Brickell to Edgewater to Bal Harbour/Bay Harbour...Metro Mover, Metrorail and buses called “trolleys” in various neighborhoods are mass transit options also....and that’s just Miami—not even mentioning two other areas in its MSA—Ft Lauderdale and West Palm.
I did say that is changing. It (and FL in general) is definitely still somewhat lagging though. Same with my favorite city in the South (Atlanta.) There are roughly 6M people living in each area. Compare that to cities such as Montreal, SF, Philly, etc.... I love ATL (You love Miami) but they still have a long way to go.
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Old 02-24-2019, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Montreal/Miami/Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
This is an interesting topic, and different from the usual.

I'll go on a limb here and say, maybe, LA? For a city of its size I find it to be severely lacking in basic urban infrastructure. (Same with Miami, but progress is being made there, and across Florida in general.)
Yeah, I was inspired from a conversation I had when I was back in MIA. My friends, still there were talking about Brickell City Centre and how cool the concept was, and I responded with "MTL has had something like this since the 70s" and they flipped cause they thought they were one of the firsts. The same thing happened when talking about Wynwood and the arts scene, I responded by saying "yeah, you guys are 20+ years behind". So it got me thinking which cities are behind with development, art, urban build etc.. This also applies to older cities too, where newer cities have something amazing transit wise for example and older cities are running on old tech and are behind. So this topic applies to old and new cities because they both can learn from each other.
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Old 02-24-2019, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Miami, The Magic City
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I don’t think Atlanta and Miami need to apologize—they will never become the next/another NYC, SF, CHI etc. but they certainly have evolved and advanced over the past 20-30 years and become players on the national and international stage...there are other cities that have progressed to a lesser extent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
I did say that is changing. It (and FL in general) is definitely still somewhat lagging though. Same with my favorite city in the South (Atlanta.) There are roughly 6M people living in each area. Compare that to cities such as Montreal, SF, Philly, etc.... I love ATL (You love Miami) but they still have a long way to go.
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Old 02-24-2019, 08:04 PM
 
5,126 posts, read 5,667,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by savvysearch View Post

I don’t agree with LA either. Rail transit is “behind” but not because the city is lagging behind.

LA adapts to the times. It had an extensive rail system at the turn of the last century. Cars become popular, so they paved over it. Now cars are congesting the streets since the 90s, so they’re back to building rail again.
There was a documentary on this about 20 years ago.

It wasn't just because cars got popular. The LA rail system was very popular and citizens were happy with it.

It was the influence of the car industry that lobbied to remove the old rail system in LA. They wanted people to rely on cars. Essentially, they destroyed the infrastructure.
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Old 02-24-2019, 08:50 PM
 
14,074 posts, read 22,340,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
In that case, take your pick. Seattle, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Miami lack some of the cultural depth, transit, etc. of the Philly/Boston/SF group were starting to identify with, which in some cases are also direct size comparables.

Same with Austin, Charlotte, etc., with their new peer group.
This makes the most sense.
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