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Old 02-24-2019, 08:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djesus007 View Post
Yeah, I was inspired from a conversation I had when I was back in MIA. My friends, still there were talking about Brickell City Centre and how cool the concept was, and I responded with "MTL has had something like this since the 70s" and they flipped cause they thought they were one of the firsts. The same thing happened when talking about Wynwood and the arts scene, I responded by saying "yeah, you guys are 20+ years behind". So it got me thinking which cities are behind with development, art, urban build etc.. This also applies to older cities too, where newer cities have something amazing transit wise for example and older cities are running on old tech and are behind. So this topic applies to old and new cities because they both can learn from each other.
Montreal is a significantly older city than Miami. I'd imagine that would play a role in MTL having certain amenities 20yrs before Miami. Does that make Miami "behind"? It'd make more sense to compare older cities to other older cities that are lacking or have no excuse to not be "caught up" so to speak.
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Old 02-24-2019, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Montreal/Miami/Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Montreal is a significantly older city than Miami. I'd imagine that would play a role in MTL having certain amenities 20yrs before Miami. Does that make Miami "behind"? It'd make more sense to compare older cities to other older cities that are lacking or have no excuse to not be "caught up" so to speak.
They're behind in urban core developments, transit and the arts/hip scene. We're behind when it comes to residential towers downtown (slowly changing, there's about 10K U/C right now) developing the waterfront and our port is still underutilized.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 AM
 
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Louisville. No rail whatsoever, not even a streetcar. Bus transit is pretty poor also. Barely any downtown residences or retail. No train station for a commuter or Amtrak train. The city continues building/reconstructing highways and interstates and interchanges. There is literally a massive interstate right on the riverfront cutting off the city from any waterfront activity except for a single park away from the population center. All the shopping is in the suburbs in malls.

I'll give it credit that its urban neighborhoods are rebounding. Germantown and NuLu are cool neighborhoods, but really all they're getting are restaurants/bars. There are no new retail corridors, few large residential projects, etc. The downtown has such great potential that it's honestly really sad. The streets are generally pretty narrow to make for good retail/nightlife corridors. But there is just absolutely not enough residential construction downtown to make it into a neighborhood where people would move to in droves. They don't even have a grocery store in downtown...
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Old Yesterday, 10:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Louisville. No rail whatsoever, not even a streetcar. Bus transit is pretty poor also. Barely any downtown residences or retail. No train station for a commuter or Amtrak train. The city continues building/reconstructing highways and interstates and interchanges. There is literally a massive interstate right on the riverfront cutting off the city from any waterfront activity except for a single park away from the population center. All the shopping is in the suburbs in malls.

I'll give it credit that its urban neighborhoods are rebounding. Germantown and NuLu are cool neighborhoods, but really all they're getting are restaurants/bars. There are no new retail corridors, few large residential projects, etc. The downtown has such great potential that it's honestly really sad. The streets are generally pretty narrow to make for good retail/nightlife corridors. But there is just absolutely not enough residential construction downtown to make it into a neighborhood where people would move to in droves. They don't even have a grocery store in downtown...
I think the argument against putting Louisville in this category, is that it stacks up pretty well against its peer cities. Cities anchoring metro areas of 1-1.5million people also have similar profiles to the one you described above. Perhaps an argument could be made that it's behind some of its peers in the categories you described, I'd contend there are other categories that it would be leading in as well. I don't believe that it should be included in a list of cities that are the most behind.
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Old Yesterday, 12:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I think the argument against putting Louisville in this category, is that it stacks up pretty well against its peer cities. Cities anchoring metro areas of 1-1.5million people also have similar profiles to the one you described above. Perhaps an argument could be made that it's behind some of its peers in the categories you described, I'd contend there are other categories that it would be leading in as well. I don't believe that it should be included in a list of cities that are the most behind.
I guess I understand that. Maybe I'm just slightly biased. I did enjoy my time there. But coming from LA and after going to college in SF, the jump backwards was probably more extreme for me than most. Then I moved to Jersey City in the NYC area and drastically jumped forward again. So I guess my opinion doesn't hold as much weight for others.
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Old Yesterday, 01:32 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,130 posts, read 18,814,409 times
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Fort Worth

- public transportation
- competing to get major corporations
- urban neighborhoods (even though we have them, they're just now getting off the ground)
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Old Yesterday, 03:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BrandonCoombes View Post
Charlotte with their transit comes to mind.
Why not mention other cities similar in size to Charlotte without rail-based transit?
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Old Yesterday, 04:21 PM
 
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Jackson, Mississippi
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Old Yesterday, 04:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Jackson, Mississippi
It's so behind I forgot it exists.
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Old Yesterday, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
In that case, take your pick. Seattle, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Miami lack some of the cultural depth, transit, etc. of the Philly/Boston/SF group were starting to identify with, which in some cases are also direct size comparables.

Same with Austin, Charlotte, etc., with their new peer group.
Actually Miami and ATL are ahead of most American cities IMO when it comes to cultural depth and (especially) rail transit. As you know, Seattle is just recently playing catch up after rejecting the subway system in the 70s, and Atlanta is pretty far ahead having a heavy rail system even larger than LA’s. Miami has a rapid transit system too which isn’t as large as Atlanta’s, but for as small as Miami city limits are, its coverage is pretty decent.

The Texas cities and Charlotte I would agree with though.
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