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Old 04-27-2008, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,607 posts, read 20,188,106 times
Reputation: 5311

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First of all, the "Sun Belt" is actually 2 different regions with vastly different urban geographies-- the southwest and the southeast. Actually, a typical suburban development in Phoenix is DENSER than your typical suburban area in the northeast (or the south). Phoenix, while not vertically dense (it's almost exclusively a low-rise city of 1-story buildings), is very horizontally dense-- homes are packed together fairly tight with small yards, since the city is built on a perfect 1x1 mile square grid, properties abut each other perfectly, with no open space (other than desert mountain preserves, land which is pretty much unbuildable anyway). That being said, I agree that the car-based lifestyle will be going downhill in the near future. But that still doesn't mean that the official "downtown" is the end-all, be-all of "urban" life. My point was Phoenix seems like it's trying to create just another run of the mill convention center downtown-- I don't even know of one thing in downtown Phoenix that's truly unique. Cities will never go back to the mono-centric model of the 19th century; there will always be many different business and population centers, downtown being just one of many. Suburban "edge cities" might even turn into new mixed-use downtowns. The difference is that intra-city rail transportation will become much more important as gas prices shoot through the roof.

 
Old 04-27-2008, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,265 posts, read 7,190,859 times
Reputation: 3952
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
First of all, the "Sun Belt" is actually 2 different regions with vastly different urban geographies-- the southwest and the southeast. Actually, a typical suburban development in Phoenix is DENSER than your typical suburban area in the northeast (or the south). Phoenix, while not vertically dense (it's almost exclusively a low-rise city of 1-story buildings), is very horizontally dense-- homes are packed together fairly tight with small yards, since the city is built on a perfect 1x1 mile square grid, properties abut each other perfectly, with no open space (other than desert mountain preserves, land which is pretty much unbuildable anyway). That being said, I agree that the car-based lifestyle will be going downhill in the near future. But that still doesn't mean that the official "downtown" is the end-all, be-all of "urban" life. My point was Phoenix seems like it's trying to create just another run of the mill convention center downtown-- I don't even know of one thing in downtown Phoenix that's truly unique. Cities will never go back to the mono-centric model of the 19th century; there will always be many different business and population centers, downtown being just one of many. Suburban "edge cities" might even turn into new mixed-use downtowns. The difference is that intra-city rail transportation will become much more important as gas prices shoot through the roof.
Well said. You make a number of very important points, and thanks for clarifying some things.
 
Old 04-27-2008, 02:30 PM
Status: "It's Hockey time!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Planet Earth
6,940 posts, read 7,955,889 times
Reputation: 4642
Quote:
Originally Posted by fp1978 View Post
That would be my answer as well. Don't get me wrong, Charlotte is a nice city with many positives going for it, but it most certainly is trying way too hard to be a 'big city' when it is definitely not one.
This is true, I wish the leaders could see that it isnt always a good idea to try and become your "older brother", sometimes it's best to just be yourself, and not be something youre not.
Post #500 and counting.......
 
Old 04-27-2008, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,340 posts, read 8,516,210 times
Reputation: 1209
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveco. View Post
Sorry but a pedestrian bridge "landmark" is rarely anything to write home about.
If you saw what it will look like, then yes it is
 
Old 04-28-2008, 03:45 AM
 
Location: Originally Fayetteville, Arkansas/ now Seattle, Washington!
1,047 posts, read 3,522,148 times
Reputation: 371
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
You're absolutely right -- sprawl is not exclusive to the Sun Belt, but my main point is that you see a lot more of it there. The impetus for growth in the Sun Belt was based off of two main things -- air conditioning and cars. So, yes, while you'll find sprawled-out development in practically any metropolitan area, there's less of it in places with Smart Growth and comprehensive public transportation. Again, this is not a criticism of living in less-densely populated areas; this is a criticism of the kind of development that is practiced outside of urban cores.
I definatly agree with you, while pretty much everywhere suffers from sprawl, some have smarter growth. Both types, less and more dense areas, have their own advantages, just depends on the individual. Personally i like both
 
Old 04-28-2008, 07:02 AM
 
17 posts, read 47,156 times
Reputation: 17
Default ? unusual thread

This is one of the craziest threads I have ever viewed. So what if a growing city looks to other successful cities for inspiration? What makes a successful city? Just because growing cities work to add arts, culture, museums, walking neighborhoods, downtown nightlife .... they aren't trying to be another city. They are trying to become attractive places to live, work, etc? This thread seems to "judge" - enjoy where you live and stop going out of your way to knock other places.
 
Old 06-15-2008, 02:58 AM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,128 posts, read 11,669,486 times
Reputation: 3418
Default Filmore West and Filmore East The Homosexual Movement

Quote:
Originally Posted by gellio_sf View Post
Thank you - I don't know where people get all this stuff from. San Francisco is NOTHING like New York, and I thank God for that. I love New York, but I don't want SF to be anything like it - they are each great cities in their own right.
1.Filmore West and Filmore East

2.In The Vanguard Of The Homosexual Movement

3.Beat Poetry Joints And The Hippie Movement

4.Urban Density Of Population S.F. Is The Second Most Dense World Class City In America As Far As Urban Density MYC Is Number One.

5. Acid Rock And Roll Global Capitals Once Upon A Time.

6.S.f. The Headquarter Of The Church Of Satan NYC a Stronghold

7.Need I Go On And On And On...........
 
Old 06-15-2008, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,575 posts, read 53,114,182 times
Reputation: 14495
What would be the opposite of this thread? " Which cities have resigned themselves to wallow in their sorrows?"
 
Old 09-11-2009, 03:50 AM
 
78 posts, read 169,781 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetclimber View Post
But they ARE the same in almost every way! Terrible traffic, out of control sprawl, flakey people, beaches, illegals, the way people drive act and talk. The only things that SD doesn't have that LA has are Hollywood and high level culture!
Uhhh no san diego's traffic isn't as bad as Los Angeles' nd yes new york city's. And there are flakey ppl everywhere.. All over the globe... Flakey ppl don't juz exist and live in socal... That's like saying only asians r smart and know martial arts. A stereotype. Why do ppl hate California so much??? What did we do?? Is it cuz we're the most populous state?????? Jealousy and they don't realize it so they talk shyt????

And why in the world would sf wanna be a nyc?? Everybody loves sf bay area the way it is, they got a unique twist to their city. I love nyc but I wouldn't wanna see sf become like it.
 
Old 09-11-2009, 06:09 AM
 
2,818 posts, read 5,154,973 times
Reputation: 3758
To an extent every city of a certain size is trying to hard. They try to make up for decades of urban exodus and destruction by creating those bland, unsuffersably smug "arts districts". The intentions might be good, but the results usually resemble a sterile hipster theme park which in most cases doesn't even feel populated.
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