U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 02:14 PM
 
268 posts, read 97,402 times
Reputation: 299

Advertisements

As an alternative to heavy or light rail because cities are cash strapped, cities are opting for bus rapid transit more where a bus typically has their own right of way, stopping at dedicated "stations" without having to spend the money to lay rail.

I think its a pretty innovative solution to get people to not use their vehicles, and if the BRT is on a dedicated right of way, it is definitely a lot faster than a regular bus. But if the BRT is high usage, it might be better in the long term for it to be upgraded to light rail or even heavy rail.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 02:16 PM
Status: "Burghalicious" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,839 posts, read 66,554,824 times
Reputation: 15445
I like Cleveland's "Health Line" between Downtown and University Circle (its "eds and meds" neighborhood). Pittsburgh is installing a new BRT linking our Downtown to Oakland (our "eds and meds" neighborhood) after reviewing Cleveland's Health Line.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Birmingham, AL
757 posts, read 475,223 times
Reputation: 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubb Rubb View Post
As an alternative to heavy or light rail because cities are cash strapped, cities are opting for bus rapid transit more where a bus typically has their own right of way, stopping at dedicated "stations" without having to spend the money to lay rail.

I think its a pretty innovative solution to get people to not use their vehicles, and if the BRT is on a dedicated right of way, it is definitely a lot faster than a regular bus. But if the BRT is high usage, it might be better in the long term for it to be upgraded to light rail or even heavy rail.
Birmingham is going this route. First 10-mile segment is expected to break ground in May.

https://www.birminghamal.gov/brt
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:36 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,806 posts, read 7,351,612 times
Reputation: 8847
While Iím certain San Diego is far from the best we do have six BRT lines, five of which start at the far (Bay) side of downtown. One travels in the median of a sunken freeway and has extensive infrastructure at a couple of its stops bringing street level access across the freeway (through ďlidsĒ over it) and down to the bus.

https://www.sdmts.com/sites/default/...er01-26-19.jpg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:35 PM
 
268 posts, read 97,402 times
Reputation: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
While Iím certain San Diego is far from the best we do have six BRT lines, five of which start at the far (Bay) side of downtown. One travels in the median of a sunken freeway and has extensive infrastructure at a couple of its stops bringing street level access across the freeway (through ďlidsĒ over it) and down to the bus.

https://www.sdmts.com/sites/default/...er01-26-19.jpg
Does the whole BRT have its own dedicated right of way or set lanes, or is it sitting with the rest of traffic but with much more limited stops than the typical bus route?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:42 PM
 
9,013 posts, read 9,166,740 times
Reputation: 5482
Pretty sure itís Pittsburgh they have 3 exclusive Busways with like 70mph speed limits. Although LA might be close, but itís a much larger city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:49 PM
 
268 posts, read 97,402 times
Reputation: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Pretty sure itís Pittsburgh they have 3 exclusive Busways with like 70mph speed limits. Although LA might be close, but itís a much larger city.
Pittsburgh's BRT isn't done yet as far as I know, but someone from Pitt can correct me on that one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:52 PM
 
9,013 posts, read 9,166,740 times
Reputation: 5482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubb Rubb View Post
Pittsburgh's BRT isn't done yet as far as I know, but someone from Pitt can correct me on that one.
I mean the East, South and West Busways which are done. The Oakland BRT is normal street-running BRT
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin...r._East_Busway
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:59 PM
 
277 posts, read 79,979 times
Reputation: 382
Most American systems are "BRT light". The most successful ones are probably LA (Orange Line), Pittsburg, and Cleveland (Health Line).


Metroway in Northern Virginia and the recently commenced GRTC Pulse in Richmond are up-and-coming.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,275 posts, read 1,608,561 times
Reputation: 1596
Albuquerque has the nation's first Gold-rated BRT line, the $135 million Albuquerque Rapid Transit. It achieved the rating in a limited start back in November 2017, but has had issues with its fleet that was originally going to be all-electric articulated buses, the first of its kind in the country. Troubles arised with the buses and so the full start of service was delayed. In the time since then the city has decided to go with a more conventional fleet of articulated buses from a different manufacturer and service is now expected to get fully underway by the end of this year. The ART achieved its Gold-rating because of its design with mostly separated, bus-only lanes and center island, raised stations for level boarding along its route. Two more lines are planned with the same characteristics. Albuquerque currently has three 'BRT lite' lines already in service that feature limited stops and articulated buses.

https://betterburque.files.wordpress.../nighthawk.jpg

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DqR7oARWkAAQ6oD.jpg

https://misc.pagesuite.com/3630c326-...1_394US439.jpg

https://media.krqe.com/nxs-krqetv-me...181_ver1.0.jpg

https://urbanabq1.files.wordpress.co...ors-abq-lg.jpg

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPhn9wtU8AAfrKB.jpg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top