U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which is your favorite: Rocky or Appalachian mountains
Rocky 186 57.59%
Appalachian 137 42.41%
Voters: 323. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-17-2013, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Colorado
2,561 posts, read 4,870,096 times
Reputation: 2219

Advertisements

Lived In both..used to care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-09-2015, 01:24 PM
 
22 posts, read 15,681 times
Reputation: 43
I've lived in the east all my life and have always liked the Appalachians, but I was just in CO and have to say the Rockies are amazing in their own way. There's just so many more levels to the terrain in the Rockies. You start out at valley level and keep going up and up and you go past fir forests, alpine lakes, tundra, etc. Its kinda boring as there's only fir trees but usually the more extreme weather makes up for it. For instance I went up Mt Evans and it was 65'ish at the base but 35*F and snowing at the peak in the middle of summer. You don't experience that in the Apps unless you're on Mt. Washington.

What I don't like about the Rockies is that the elevation can be too much. It takes entire days to hike up mountains there, and the increased elevation and massive views can be daunting. Its not that relaxing... that and I don't like how they're mostly desert/dry terrain. And I don't like their geology as much as the Apps. With the Rockies they don't seem to be such a continuous range, there's clusters of mountains seperated by vast stretches of flat desert/grassland, and I believe they originated by uplift and erosion of their plateau? I like the folded appearance of the Apps more its more reminiscent of a continental collison which seems to be more striking overall. Its like individual mountains in the Rockies can be much more awe-inspiring but I consider the Apps to be more awe-inspiring as a whole. IIRC the Apps were much more of a barrier to western settlement than the Rockies were, with their dense forests and never-ending arrays of parallel ridges. I'm not sure if you could ever consider hills to be that much of a barrier to movement?

Those who knock the Apps, they're real mountains. Someone quoted the highest mountain in Texas as being higher than anything back east....but it sits on a 5700' plateau with only 3000' of prominence. Mt. Mitchell and Mt. Washington are both on the list of "ultra" prominent mountains worldwide with over 6000' of prominence each. To me that is what makes a mountain, the difference between it and the landscape. I've seen Denali in Alaska and its so prominent you can see it over the curvature of the Earth, hundreds of miles away in Fairbanks. The 14'ers in the Rockies sure look amazing but they're only about 8000' of prominence on a 5000-6000' plateau which is only 2000-3000' more prominent than Mitchell and Washington.

I also like the Apps because of their diversity, it reminds me of what I've heard about mountains in Central America, how you can have tropical conditions at the base and increasingly temperate and cool as you go up in elevation. In the Apps you can start out with southern pine in the valleys, moving up to deciduous forests and eventually fir forests at the very peaks. There's a LOT of diversity in the forests. The fir at the peaks also remind me of the fir on the lower elevations of the Rockies and gives the tops of the highest southern Apps an alpine feel. Also they can be dramatic, try going up I-77 from NC to the mountains in VA near Mt. Rogers, its very much like going up I-70 from Denver into the Rockies. Approaching the N. Ga mountains from Atlanta on 400 or I-575 always looks dramatic as well, the mountains loom tall in the distance from a ways away as you approach. Also, standing on the summit of Grandfather Mountain in NC can be almost as dizzying as being on Mt. Evans. And like how I saw snow on Mt. Evans in summer, the Wikipedia article for Mt. Mitchell https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Mitchell states that flurries can be seen on the summit even in July, at the same latitude and only miles away from Raleigh, NC which can be 90-100*F that same day. Sure the 6000 footers in the Apps aren't mountains, lol.

I've been to the UK and consider Ben Nevis and Snowdon and others to be mountains and they're smaller than the Appalachians. They're supposed to be of a similar origin to the Apps, along with the Atlas in Africa and the mountains in Scandinavia which I think also adds some awe to the Apps, that you can basically see the chain on both sides of the Atlantic.

I've also enjoyed skiing in the Apps, its more technical and less fast, and imperfect conditions can be more challenging. Going down the black diamonds on Snowshoe or Sugar mountain can be epic in their own way. I've also experienced conditions that reminded me of being in the Sierra Nevada. Raining/sleeting in the mountain valleys, but blizzard conditions and fresh powder (FEET of snow) as you get up the mountain and on the ski resort. Hills just don't have those sort of characteristics.

Last edited by sdgdf; 09-09-2015 at 01:34 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 10:51 PM
 
8,440 posts, read 10,719,369 times
Reputation: 6201
Rocky Mtns. No comparison and where my Mtn. States Resident comes from, although someone argued with me years ago my post times wouldn't let me post from the Rocky Mtn. areas. He was odd The Rocky Moutains are not


MSR
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2015, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
3,660 posts, read 4,303,625 times
Reputation: 4526
Again it's all up to personal tastes.

The Rockies are gorgeous but I will never feel at home the same way I do in Appalachia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2015, 02:16 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,481,271 times
Reputation: 3491
I like the Rockies better for geology and the Appalachians better for biology.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2015, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,099 posts, read 1,028,167 times
Reputation: 1374
I greatly prefer the Appalachians. There's just something homey about them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2015, 04:10 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,136 posts, read 21,133,751 times
Reputation: 23168
Do we have to choose? I like mountains, period.

But if you don't know the difference between the two I have a little hint for you. In summer of 1967 we were planning a trip to Rocky Mountain National Park on July 4th. Our landlady told us to take a coat with us. I grew up about five miles from the Blue Ridge Parkway and thought that meant sweater. I was wrong. When we got to the Continental Divide it was snowing and we were praying our car would not overheat like some were and our car heater would keep working. This year when we went from Durango to Silverton in May, I took along my fake fur coat and a lot of other people wished they had theirs. We had snow there too.

Last edited by NCN; 09-10-2015 at 04:29 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2015, 08:54 AM
 
478 posts, read 618,207 times
Reputation: 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Do we have to choose? I like mountains, period.

But if you don't know the difference between the two I have a little hint for you. In summer of 1967 we were planning a trip to Rocky Mountain National Park on July 4th. Our landlady told us to take a coat with us. I grew up about five miles from the Blue Ridge Parkway and thought that meant sweater. I was wrong. When we got to the Continental Divide it was snowing and we were praying our car would not overheat like some were and our car heater would keep working. This year when we went from Durango to Silverton in May, I took along my fake fur coat and a lot of other people wished they had theirs. We had snow there too.
Haha I agree-mountains are amazing, regardless of shape/size/vegetation. Love them all.

But, If I had to pick,I pick choice "C": the coast ranges of British Columbia up through southeast Alaska & the Chugach.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2015, 05:09 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,490 posts, read 13,349,016 times
Reputation: 19916
Fell in love when I first saw the 'smoke' rising from the southern Appalachians. Rockies are just too stark for my taste.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2015, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
3,660 posts, read 4,303,625 times
Reputation: 4526
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Fell in love when I first saw the 'smoke' rising from the southern Appalachians. Rockies are just too stark for my taste.
Even here in the Alleghenies steam rises out of the trees like smoke. It's really something!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top