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View Poll Results: Which is your favorite: Rocky or Appalachian mountains
Rocky 189 57.10%
Appalachian 142 42.90%
Voters: 331. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-12-2015, 11:39 AM
 
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Hey, are you guys literally and figuratively making a mountain out of a mole hill in here? Has anyone said that yet?
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Appalachians. I like the eastern hardwood forests and just the sheer amount of rivers running year round, lakes, ponds, etc.

I like the Rockies, too. I live in (or very near) them and have hiked, camped, and mountain biked thousands of miles through them. But size isn't everything.
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Old 09-16-2015, 01:09 AM
 
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That's Brasstown Bald in GA, snowcapped in October.
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Old 09-16-2015, 06:52 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,886 posts, read 40,714,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post

Ithaca though... that's a city I can't really explain. It's not huge per say but it's got a totally different urban atmosphere and general mind set from even the small towns right next to it. It is also much wealthier than any other southern tier city; I'd say mostly because of Cornell. It commands Tompkins county in people's minds but if you go just ten minutes south Tompkins is just like any other county in the area.

I am now curious as to how Ithaca/Cornell managed to thrive so much when its peer cities in the region struggled and continue to struggle. Seems terrain did not infringe on Ithaca much at all.
Looking up from wikipedia, Ithaca had a railroad route from Pennsylvania to the NY Great Lakes cities and Erie Canal, and it had some industry. So it wasn't completely isolated in the 19th century. Binghamton to Syracuse had a more convenient route, but Ezra Cornell poured money into Ithaca's railroad connections. Ithaca was less than half the size of Elmira in the early 1900s, but including the Town of Ithaca in the numbers (NY towns and cities are weird if it were in New England the city and town would be one municipality; cities/towns are all township sized here with no villages and cities within). is about 50% larger today. But yea, Ithaca's growth is all from Cornell and maybe there's been additional side businesses and transplants not-connected to the university. Few of them are from the Southern Tier itself.
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Old 09-16-2015, 10:14 AM
 
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I don't know why the Appalachians look smoother and more 'pittoresque' / scenic than the Rockies. The Apps are reminding me of the Romanian Carpathians.
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Old 09-16-2015, 02:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
You can see how severely folded and warped the ridge-and-valley region is in the central and south-central part of the state, with some really weird-looking mountain ranges,
The way those ridges are laid out sometimes creates valleys that are almost completely enclosed by mountains on all sides. Morrisons Cove, for instance, is like it's own little world, and there's some even more secluded pockets like the Kish Valley that are still largely inhabited by very orthodox Amish and Mennonite groups. It's very fascinating to me (as is Pennsylvania's topography in general, so thanks for that post!).
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Old 09-16-2015, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Boston
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Nostalgia makes me pick the Appalachians which I think get an unfair rap. Particularly the Northern Appalachians (Whites and other nearby ranges). I grew up skiing and hiking there. I still ski an occasionally hike there. I've traveled enough to have skied, hiked and seen much, much, much larger peaks (including the Rockies, Sierras, Cascades, Alps, Japanese Alps, and Himalayan foothills in India). That said, I still can't imagine how someone could be in the shadow of Katahdin, the Presidentials, or Franconia Notch and not be impressed. They definitely punch above their weight in some cases. The Rockies are the larger, grander, more impressive range. I'm partial to the Appalachians.
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Old 09-16-2015, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Looking up from wikipedia, Ithaca had a railroad route from Pennsylvania to the NY Great Lakes cities and Erie Canal, and it had some industry. So it wasn't completely isolated in the 19th century. Binghamton to Syracuse had a more convenient route, but Ezra Cornell poured money into Ithaca's railroad connections. Ithaca was less than half the size of Elmira in the early 1900s, but including the Town of Ithaca in the numbers (NY towns and cities are weird if it were in New England the city and town would be one municipality; cities/towns are all township sized here with no villages and cities within). is about 50% larger today. But yea, Ithaca's growth is all from Cornell and maybe there's been additional side businesses and transplants not-connected to the university. Few of them are from the Southern Tier itself.
Thanks for sharing that!
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Old 09-20-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdgdf View Post

That's Brasstown Bald in GA, snowcapped in October.
That's a beautiful photo! Southern Appalachian Mountains do have a different climate for sure!
It's hard to choose from Rockies or Appalachian since both mountains have their beauty.
Rockies are just like the word.."rocks" lots of Mountains in the area, a lot but some of them don't seem as high or majestic as the Mountains in the West Coast like Cascades or Sierra Nevadas.
So it's a tough call for me.. I mean yea in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, New Mexico some of those peaks are real nice and tall but dont seem too high because for example ..Much of those Rocky Mountain states statewide is already at a high elevation even the Plains are "High" plains.
So Some peaks in North Carolina for example look just as big as the Mountains in lets say New Mexico or Arizona as far as elevation wise except North Carolina highest peaks are around 5,500 to 6,800 feet high.
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Old 05-29-2016, 09:50 PM
 
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I know I'm very late, but here I go.


Honestly, I couldn't choose between any of them. I love both mountain ranges, have lived in both, and have spent a lot of time in both. The Rockies are rugged, jagged, with lots of rocks, white water rafting and hiking. It also has a lot of big game (which is why I go out there to hunt) and has a bunch of coniferous trees which clump together.


The Appalachians, on the other hand, are more smooth but can still be high up, are also good for white water rafting and ESPECIALLY rock climbing. The cliffs and huge fallen rocks which fall from the mountains give for perfect climbing opportunities. Hiking is also pretty awesome in the Appalachians. It isn't as challenging, but it's peaceful. As for vegetation, the Appalachians have dozens of different trees spread around, and look beautiful, especially in the fall.


Overall, both mountain ranges have their ups and downs, (see what I did there?) but I believe most are beautiful in different ways. The size of the mountains mean nothing to me. P.S, the people getting in arguments over which mountains are higher, which mountains are more beautiful and ****, keep it to your own opinions, please- even if it's a forum.

Last edited by Epicperson43; 05-29-2016 at 10:31 PM..
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